Scarfing Jig

Discussion in 'Boatbuilding' started by qadeer, Jun 19, 2002.

  1. qadeer
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    qadeer Junior Member

    I have seen a scarfing jig that attaches to power planer and would like to create one. Does anyone know how this is done or a link to a simple design ?
     
  2. duluthboats
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    duluthboats Senior Dreamer

  3. qadeer
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    qadeer Junior Member

    thanks

    Thanks Gary.

    I have got in touch with the folks of this Jig, this was the one I have heard of and recalled seeing, plus the fact I actually have a Makita planer may make it worthwhile to just buy it instead of making my own, unless I see plans somewhere. Appreciate the heads-up.

    I am putting the finishing touches on a little strip canoe for the family and really excited about trying to build a whitehall or maybe a southport puller, not sure. Need all the practice I can get building cause I want to build a small sailing cruiser next year.

    Thanks again.

    q
     
  4. Guest

    Guest Guest

    There is a collection of ways to scarf. A router jig works well, simply sawing close to the scarf lines you have drawn and hand planning carefully to the lines works well also. A good source of info about scarfing can be found in 'The Gougeon Brothers on Boat Contruction' and in this book you will find a whole chapter on scarfing. Also, in the book there are some photo's of a slick and simple idea they have come up with to scarf large pieces of plywood. They have attached a guide to the underside of a circular saw and from what I see in the photo's, makes some king sized scarfs accurately and quickly. Also, this same book has a lot of very good info describing the various methods of boat contruction and a whole lot more.
    good luck
    Richard
     
  5. Guest

    Guest Guest

  6. flame
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    flame Junior Member

  7. War Whoop
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    War Whoop Senior Member

    http://www.westsystem.com/

    Go to Product Information then special tools and cleaners.

    They have a scarfing attachment for a circular saw I made one once and it was a lot faster than my plane.
     
  8. flame
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    flame Junior Member

    Hi again,

    the gear to attach to the circular saw (West system or my homemade "clone") however have a disadvantage :( :

    They work fine only for sheet material of a thickness of typ. 8mm depending on the dia of the wheel.

    I used this way for constructing stringers of laminated strips of 5mm ply, so I first scarfed the broad side of a whole panel, then cut it into strips. So they were immediately ready for glueing without further preparations

    If you got sheet material, this tool is brilliant; if you got -say- strips of oak (I had 150 x 6mm for the keel), lay a few out on your table, clamp them with a thick plank, using additional wedges to fix the inner strips, cut it to same lenght and scarf it

    Care must be taken not to drop the tool when reaching the edge; keep it horizontal until the wheel has clearly left the wood. I spoiled the first edges trusting my ears too much :rolleyes:

    Good luck
    Mike

    OBS: my pictures had to move to http://www.dauda.at
     
  9. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    I scarf without a jig. My method consists of stacking all the plywood or planks on a bench and either screw or clamp them down. I stagger them at a distance eight times their thickness. I mark a line paralel to the edge on the uppermost plank or plywood at the same spacing. Then I plane a flat surface from the line to the edge of the last plank or board. It is much faster than any jig and I can scarf as many layers as I want at once.
     
  10. flame
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    flame Junior Member

    Hi Gonzo,

    I used the method you described on pieces of 10x30mm oak for my sheerstrakes with a 1:10 slope, stack of 3 plus one rubbish at the top for protection and better guidance.

    Allthough I agree by large with your comment, I found it a bit difficult to guide the electric plane so that the scarf doesn't "hang" to one side. I had to move the plane up&down from both sides a couple of times until I arrived at a plain, nonhanging surface of even slope throughout

    Secondly, at the begin of the action, I spoiled my first set because the plane went too deep into #2 and damaged the edge of one strip. In general, with a bit more of excercise I think I can become better on this method as well. Will keep trying ...
     
  11. oceangboy2000
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    oceangboy2000 Junior Member

  12. nero
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    nero Senior Member

    Gonzo's method works well and is fast. You'll have to get a feel for your powerplaner. Maybe finish up a bit with a handplane.
     
  13. flame
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    flame Junior Member

    2 years later ...

    and with a lot more practice: 100% agree, good method.

    (
    However - for sheet material up to 8 mm I still use my homebrew scarfing slide attached to the circ saw :) http://www.dauda.at/EN/03.html
    )
     

  14. CapGeorge
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    CapGeorge New Member

    Check out the Bateau.com design comments. They say scarfing isn't necessary in most of their stitch&glue designs and have substituted a butt design method.
     
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