Saracen - Lex Nicol CRT35

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by fastthing, May 9, 2013.

  1. fastthing
    Joined: May 2013
    Posts: 7
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Raymond Island

    fastthing Junior Member

    We recently purchased Saracen and sailed her home to Victoria from Brisbane. What a delight!!!
    Very even tempered lass that she is!!!
    I have a certain amount of her history, but if anyone has any further information about Saracen, I would be most greatful.
    She was built in 1975 as a 33 footer and during the years was extended to 35 feet. One of the first foam sandwitch built multi's as I understand.
    Being as this is my first post, I tried to post photo's of her in Refuge Cove, Wilsons Prom, but I couldn't find them, hopefully this will be more successful!!!
    As a racing multi, I understand she did quite well, winning several major races in Queensland. I would like to see some photo's as well as history as the refit in 2008 has changed things in the rig department.
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Corley
    Joined: Oct 2009
    Posts: 3,707
    Likes: 155, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 826
    Location: Melbourne, Australia

    Corley epoxy coated

    Sweet boat you have there and quite comfortably fitted out for cruising for such a fast boat.
     
  3. fastthing
    Joined: May 2013
    Posts: 7
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Raymond Island

    fastthing Junior Member

    Saracen

    Thanks Corley,
    We recently went to Wilsons Prom and coming home was a blast. One of those really black nights and my wife was on watch. I had gone down below to my bunk. The noise started to sound fast for 2.5 mtre waves, on enquiry I was told 16 knots, everything was remaining smooth but we did slow things down just a bit. I take my hat off to Lex Nicol, she really is a great design.
     
  4. fastthing
    Joined: May 2013
    Posts: 7
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Raymond Island

    fastthing Junior Member

    Saracen

    I would just like to add, when I look at other multi's, more modern than Saracen, I do see changes but the principles of a lot of the older multi's remain the same.
    I read somewhere in another thread that perhaps we are throwing the baby out with the bathwater and not really learning about what we can in the way of safety and design. A number of the really big multi's have become a danger to themselves, in my opinion. The lightest materials we have for building are still not strong enough to withstand the forces really big multi's generate.
    Just as back in earlier years when multi's had such a bad rep. because they had such a high level of tipposity (new word!!!!!). I guess we just need to reach some balance.............................now here's a thought, perhaps this is where the cruising multi's can teach us a few things. Speed is nice and the cruising speed of Saracen is surely greater than an equivalent mono, but the big racing cats. Do they need to be designed to go sooooooooo fast that they become a danger to those sailing in them? Why is this road being travelled when the repercussions for people is so great? I would suggest that there are some very greedy people in this world!!! Just a thought and have a great day.
     
  5. Corley
    Joined: Oct 2009
    Posts: 3,707
    Likes: 155, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 826
    Location: Melbourne, Australia

    Corley epoxy coated

    I recall Phil (catsketcher on this forum) wrote a very good article about this and I agree with his basic idea that ultimately it was the cruising multihulls that proved out the overall concept not the racing boats. I also think that Newick's ideas on being careful not to be "greedy" in terms of lightweight and sail area have merit.

    Part of the problem is with the cruiser/racer concept where do you draw the line since multihulls are more subject to the vagaries of user error how safe do you make them versus the performance. I think that's something that designers of multihulls have been scratching their head over for years. The answer is that there is no answer and it's best to make a clear and honest statement as to where the design sits in the performance scale and communicate that to the end user as long as that's done lucidly then that is all that is required.

    When a boat is designed as a racer then all bets are off and that means you are also ready as the owner to accept a higher level of risk in terms of the boat and your own personal safety. The problem is where do you draw the line as some sailors are willing to accept a higher level of risk than others. That's the point where it has to be handed over to the individual and see if they are prepared to take risk and all it entails.
     

  6. fastthing
    Joined: May 2013
    Posts: 7
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Raymond Island

    fastthing Junior Member

    Saracen

    I certainly do not have a problem with what you say Corley and to what point do we go to for the purpose of saving ourselves from a disaster. The unfortunate thing about the America's Cup incident is that it will push the whole Multi V Mono thing, and the rank and file punter who does not sail will think that all multi's are bad news, with even thinking about the differences within both divisions.
    I firmly believe in the whole racing thing and have done so for many years. I also believe that from this pointy end of the stick a lot of good can come with the development of both multi's and mono's. But to what point do we say enough, too many people are being risked or worse.
    Cheers
     
Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.