sanding

Discussion in 'Fiberglass and Composite Boat Building' started by downtownfish, Mar 3, 2011.

  1. downtownfish
    Joined: Mar 2011
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    Location: Fort Lauderdale

    downtownfish Junior Member

    I have read through this forum and found a few sanding threads and didn't see any mention of a Makita 9227 which is a buffer or sander. Runs very slow or super fast but no random or orbital settings. My friend who builds surfboards lent it to me for my boat job. It seems it is the surfboard industy standard for sanding boards. Does anyone uses these on boats. I am removing crappy paint and sanding the OG gelcoat of a 15ft boston whaler. Any input? I tried to post this question on another sanding thread but they said they are over 880 days old and do not allow new post.(putting that out there for the forum police)
     
    Last edited: Mar 3, 2011
  2. downtownfish
    Joined: Mar 2011
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    downtownfish Junior Member

    Holy sh*t I have a lot to learn. I am assuming this is by accident.
     
  3. Petros
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    Petros Senior Member

    best way to remove paint is with stripper or a heat gut. do not use the heat gun if you will damage the underlayers, so chemical stripper is it. One relatively inexpensive stripper that is non-toxic is Citristrip available in big box stores, another is something called Soy-Strip or something similar (it has a soy bean derivative as the active agent).

    Sanding is always a last resort to removing old finish. Many would prefer hand sanding so you do not damage the structural fibers of a composite hull. If you expose fibers you have weakened the layup.
     
  4. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Scrape, scrape, scrape is the best way, though it does require skill or you can make a mess pretty quickly. A sharp scrapper is a wonderful thing. You can sharpen one in less then a minute, if it's in good condition and they are very precise. They are also much better for the wood and especially the finish, particularly if varnished or epoxied.

    Chemical strippers can stain the wood, harm fasteners and often raise the grain. Heat guns usually scorch the wood, even if handled skillfully, you'll have a burn mark or two. Sand paper is what it is, leaving a fuzzy, torn up surface (compared to a scraped surface) that takes paint well, but not so much for a bright finish.

    The original poster is referring to a buffer/sander. It's a pure disk sander, usually 6", 7", 9" and 10" sizes. I have a 7" and a 10" that I use often. They are for bulk removal and smoothing operations. I have 24 grit on the 10" and it can eat through a 1/4" plywood panel in a matter of seconds. This is the point of the machine, bulk material removal. Naturally finer grits will smooth more then wholesale eating, but a good tool to knock down high spots with. The 7" I use for smoothing, buffing and polishing mostly.
     
  5. downtownfish
    Joined: Mar 2011
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    downtownfish Junior Member

    Thank you so much guys. I am going to buy it on my way home after work. I had planned on sanding the whole thing down, so this will give me a head start.
     
  6. downtownfish
    Joined: Mar 2011
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    downtownfish Junior Member

    It will not affect the fiberglass if it soaks all the way through the paint will it?
     

  7. pescaloco
    Joined: Feb 2006
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    pescaloco Senior Member

    To answer your question directly I Don't think the Makita polisher/sander is the the right tool for the job. You would be better off with a D/A dual action sander and some hand sanding for your 15 foot Whaler.
     
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