Sandblasted..

Discussion in 'Metal Boat Building' started by harrisdr, Apr 5, 2008.

  1. Brent Swain
    Joined: Mar 2002
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    Location: British Columbia

    Brent Swain Member

    Sandblasted

    My plans include drawings for a mast that most people get up for less than $500 for materials and self steering for around $20 in materials. My book tells you how to build sheet blocks for less than a dollar ,in twenty minutes and a 540 gallon a day watermaker for under $1,000 , a roller furler for under $200, an onboard welder for under $40. etc etc.
    My two burner stove came from Harbor freight . They are made in India of excellent non magnetic stainless and sell for $50. I've never used anything but a two burner stove , in the last 35 years , and haven't felt the need for anything else.
    My galvanized rigging costs around $25 for enough to rig a 36 footer. The world is awash in used sails that are still in excellent condition for a fraction the price of new ones. I'd rather have a spare than have a new one with nothing to back it up.
    You can get underway with an outboard on the back for a few years, altho it is wise to put a stern tube in and a set of wide, low engine mounts, and an exhuast outlet, in the building stage for future use. That which is welded down should be the best, that which can easily be changed quickly when better options show up , can be greatly economised on, to get ones self out sailing quickly.
    My book defines the difference between resale price and resale value, something that many hombuilders fail to understand.
    Resale price is what a boat sells for. Resale value is the difference between what a boat sells for and what she cost you in the first place. It is common for people to spend an extra $40,000 to increase the resale price by $20,000 , a net loss of $20,000.
    I sold my last boat for roughly 5 times what she cost me to build . The first 31 I built sold for 3 times what her owner spent on her. As the price tag increases, the gap between what she cost to build and what she sells for decreases, until it becomes a net loss. The number of potential customers also decreases.

    On origami
    In an origami 36 footer the chine is 14 feet long, with both ends being sections of cones. Thus both ends are a single piece of steel from the bulwark cap to the centreline, and are totally fair, with no distortion whatever. For a while Waterline Yachts adopted this on their radiused chine hulls, and the results were beautiful. Then, for some unknown reason, they went back to a radiused piece the full length of the hull. These were easily recognisable from across the harbour, by the ugly flat spot in the stern between the radiused piece and the top of the rail. It is as ugly and dissappointing as a beautiful woman with a big flat spot on her ***.
    I think you builders of round bilge steel boats could gain something by experimenting with using a single piece of steel in the bow and stern of your designs, from rail to centreline , thus eliminating the need to roll anything but the midship sections. It only takes a tiny amount of tweaking the lines to make it possible in most round bilge designs, with no loss in function and a huge gain in aesthetics, ease of building and performance...
    Brent
     
  2. pengreg
    Joined: Feb 2005
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    Location: South Africa

    pengreg Junior Member

    er, sorry to interrupt guys, but Harris I think your boat is beautifull, that a Dutch built round bilge is something of value, that the hull is only a fraction of the cost of a complete sailboat, and only a fraction of your hull is bad. The balance of the boat is good and your outlay thus far is not too bad, therefore this is a worthwhile project. You do however, have an enormous task ahead of you and I wish you courage and success. Er.. carry on..
     
  3. MarkC
    Joined: Oct 2003
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    Location: Germany

    MarkC Senior Member

    if we could please get back to the topic.:rolleyes:

    Harrisdr asked what to do with his discovered damage. It looks like to me (my unprofessional opinion) that the "localised" rust sections - she has suffered electrolysis from her lead keel or the boats next to her - perhaps no sacrificial electrodes of zinc were fitted.

    And at some time in her LONG career she has broken free and smacked her stern quater on a... dock? etc.

    All in all not bad for a yacht from 1962! Have a look at some of the wooden yachts from 1962! Fiberglass from 1962?

    Harrisdr - you are not the only one. - have a look at the thread below with the Witholz 35footer with rusting along the deck connection.

    In that previous post someone recommended that:

    Again- I am no qualified advice giver - but there must be an auto (car) panel beater who could cut your rust out (with your keel adequately supported) and weld your patches in. The dents could be cut out and a plate welded in or metal-worked back and bogged. Ask your panelbeater.

    Old metal boats don't die - they don't even fade away.

    good luck!
     
  4. MarkC
    Joined: Oct 2003
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    Location: Germany

    MarkC Senior Member

  5. harrisdr
    Joined: Sep 2007
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    Location: Greece

    harrisdr Junior Member

    Vielen Dank, I'll be starting next week.
     
  6. Landlubber
    Joined: Jun 2007
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    Location: Brisbane

    Landlubber Senior Member

    I repeat my eariler comments, sometimes we have to face reality and start again, having spent all the time that you are about to do, what value would you place on this vessel? Have you over capitalised it? What is it worth as a wreck to strip and reuse anything worth while saving?

    Please consider all this before wasting good money after bad.

    If it is irrelevant how much you spend on it for some personal reason, well so be it, that is up to you, you have asked for opinions and received many, just how qualified some of these may be, well you have to decide, it is your boat.
    We can only express our opinions from our experiences with such matters.

    All the best whatever you decide.
     
  7. lazeyjack

    lazeyjack Guest

    yes well we are all different, I hate rolled chines, they neither fish not fowl, I would rather have a two chined boat, if I wanted a quickbuild As B Swain says, they are damned ugglesome aft, in fact they damn ugly full stop:))
    now tell me how you build this without frames, it is my last build, , the forefoot changes shape so quickly, the frames were at 400 and no stringers 8mm bottom and 6mm topsides, alluminium
     

    Attached Files:

  8. Wynand N
    Joined: Oct 2004
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    Location: South Africa

    Wynand N Retired Steelboatbuilder

    easy... see my webpage - Dix 38 frameless next to a framed Dix 57 & 65.;)

    Last build Jack:?: Don't make me laugh - boat builders do not stop, they just fade away.....
     
  9. harrisdr
    Joined: Sep 2007
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    Location: Greece

    harrisdr Junior Member

    Hello Landlubber, thanks again for the good attitude.
    I'm stripping it off inside. I will know much more in a while.
    Thanks again.
     
  10. Brent Swain
    Joined: Mar 2002
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    Location: British Columbia

    Brent Swain Member

    I simply figure out the plate shapes , cut them out of full sized 8 ft by 36 ft plates, weld bulwark caps and longitudinal stringers on, and pull the edges together, with comealongs, tacking with good sized tacks inside and out when possible. The chines at the ends I don't cut out, leaving the ends polyconic, with the apex of the cone at the start of the chines. This results in beautifuly shaped ends, and the short chines amidships below the waterline, resulting in a boat that is undistinguishable from a round chined hull in the water.
    The decks etc are done in the same fashion, letting one do all the deck beam and stringer welding on the flat before installing the decks, eliminating most overhead welding. My book and Alex's DVD detail the proccess.
    Brent
     
  11. jonmartins
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    Location: New Zealand

    jonmartins Junior Member

    Hey Harris,

    I am rebuilding a yacht the same design as yours. Mine was slightly modified and built in New Zealand. I still have the original dutch drawings if it interest you and for sure looks exactly like yours. Would happen to know anything about it? I don't even know what make it really is so if you happen to have any info on it...

    I have a thread here somewhere with my rebuild but don't know where. It sure is a lot of work, I'm almost ready to sandblast it.

    Keep at it bro.

    Cheers

    Jonathan
     
  12. harrisdr
    Joined: Sep 2007
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    Location: Greece

    harrisdr Junior Member

    Hello Jonathan

    I still can't be sure about the original make of the boat.
    Holland or Belgium is as close as I could guess with the help of people from this Forum.

    Good luck with your own. Can I have a look at it in this Forum ??
    Believe me they are really tough vessels. Will take you anywhere Time allows.

    Harris

    PS Yes I'd be very much interested in the drawings.
    Could you ?? . .
     
  13. MCR
    Joined: Mar 2009
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    Location: Amsterdam

    MCR New Member

    Great boat!! Please keep the pictures coming!!

    I've got a suggestion on what type it might be. It looks like a Tulla 1 designed by vd Stadt.

    Maybe good for some inspiration, I also bought a late 50's and you're not alone with this restauration......
    www.deltazeekruiser.blogspot.com
    Text is in Dutch, but the pictures also tell the story.
     

  14. MCR
    Joined: Mar 2009
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    Location: Amsterdam

    MCR New Member

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