Sailboat modifications for shorthanded, blue water passages

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by misanthropicexplore, Sep 22, 2020.

  1. Rumars
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    Rumars Senior Member

    To me your list suggests a trimaran. Unsinkable, fast, beachable, light, can be as simple inside as you want. Strong is not a problem, you can make it as strong as you like. Only problem is lenght, if you want long range cruising you need a bigger one.
     
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  2. Blueknarr
    Joined: Aug 2017
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    Blueknarr Senior Member

    Yes. Your wishlist is self-contradictory. That's why there's no perfect boat.

    Prioritize and accept reasonable comprise. But don't include a swing keep. They require deep harbors and anchorages. If you remove the wind's pressure out of the sails, what is preventing the keel from pointing straight down??

    My high latitude list:
    Bigger boat + more crew = shorter watch standing for more rest
    Clear decks allow green water to flow overboard
    Stronger lifelines will more stantions.
     
  3. bajansailor
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    bajansailor Marine Surveyor

    Re the Tartan 34C, here is a link to the thread -
    Advice on repairing or abandoning old sailboat https://www.boatdesign.net/threads/advice-on-repairing-or-abandoning-old-sailboat.64499/

    Re the Danish built Grinde, I must admit that I lusted after these (and many others) in the late 70's when I read about them in sailing magazines.
    Here is a copy of an article I had on the Grinde from Yachting World.

    Grinde 26 P 1.jpg

    Grinde 26 P 2.jpg

    Edit - Sailboat Data also mentions the Grinde -
    https://sailboatdata.com/sailboat/grinde

    And they have a nice photo of one sailing -

    Grinde 26 sailing.jpg

    I remember seeing a Grinde anchored in Carlisle Bay here (Barbados) in the late 70's - she had just sailed across from the Canaries.
     
    Last edited: Sep 28, 2020
  4. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    I have cruised solo extensively in smaller boats. A narrow 21 footer is OK and the equivalent to the original Minis. The last long cruise was on an old 25 footer. I changed the outboard for a diesel I had. I would never have a bunch of electronics, A/C, watermakers or other luxuries the liveaboards require. Everything is simple, well stowed away and easy to repair with whatever is onboard. Halyards and reefing lines should be by the mast and never to the cockpit. If a sail gets jammed, and the lines go to the cockpit it is virtually impossible for a single person to fix the problem.
     
  5. Will Gilmore
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    Will Gilmore Senior Member

    Is that really true?
    I have no experience with lines running to the cockpit, but I know a lot of sailors do that. I can't see any reason they should be harder to unjam because of a turning block or two. Jammed lines are usually the result of hockeling, and that would occur in the cockpit, if lines ran through the first block there. Other reasons they jam are poorly sized line in sheaves or worn and broken sheaves, most of the time, for a halyard, that's at the masthead. I guess, as I type, I can see it being a problem anywhere along the run.

    -Will (Dragonfly)
     
  6. Blueknarr
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    Blueknarr Senior Member

    It's absolutely true.

    Less cockpit spaghetti

    Sometimes a sail slide jams in the mast. It clears with a srasaw of alternating pulling down on the sail and on the halyard. Then the cockpit spaghetti snags. Back to clean it up, before returning to the mast to guide the sail.

    There's advantage to being able to control both the line and it's load from one place.. especially when short handed.

    If fully crewed then spread the work out for better ergonomics or weight distribution. One guide at the mast, one grinding and another tailing.
     
  7. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Lines to the cockpit were designed for racing with full crews. By keeping the crew members running the halyards in the cockpit, their weight does not go forward, and they stay out of the way.
     
  8. Rumars
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    Rumars Senior Member

    Rigging choices are subjective and in the same category as "best anchor", "best keel", "best rudder". Reality shows plenty of people "cruising extensively" and sucessfully with in mast furling, in boom furling, all lines to the cockpit, roller furling headsails, electric or hydraulic winches, etc. There are arguments and even evidence for and against every single of those choices. In the end it comes down to what a certain person believes is best for him at a certain point in time. Saying "this is the only way" is BS.
     
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  9. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    I agree, and also add that aesthetic values influence my choices to a large extent.
     
  10. Will Gilmore
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    Will Gilmore Senior Member

    Now that's a racing thing. If not racing, poor seamanship.

    -Will (Dragonfly)
     
  11. Blueknarr
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    Blueknarr Senior Member

    It's poor steamship even while racing
     

  12. tlouth7
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    tlouth7 Senior Member

    If you want to go places in a reasonable time you don't get something in the 20-30 foot range, you get something in the 30-40 foot range. If you want to be truly comfortable when you get there (assume couple) you get something in the 38-50 foot range (but then costs get pretty crazy). A 1980s 30-something footer will cost very little to buy for far more boat than a 20-something footer.

    Changes to facilitate short handed sailing vary, but might include a permanent hard dodger, a different set of sails, a permanent or deployable inner forestay or solent stay. Upgrading winches to self tailing and adding a capable autopilot or windvane is common.

    Changes to allow long term living vary from stripping everything out to fitting hot running water, it depends what you want to do and where you want to go.
     
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