sailboat emergency outboard

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by Harold Anderson, Jul 30, 2011.

  1. Harold Anderson
    Joined: Jul 2011
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    Location: Corpus Christi Texas

    Harold Anderson Junior Member

    Hi, I have a Fuji 35 ketch sailboat with a perkins 50 hp diesel engine based in Corpus Christi, Tx. The engines reliability is suspect. I will rebuild it someday! Boat use is in the bays and ICW (ditch). The ICW is pretty scary to try to sail a boat this size. Would a 9.9 longshaft outboard move the boat in an emergency situation in the bay or ICW? Meaning that the diesel is out and I don't have sail room. So it would be a third alternative only used in emergency situations. The boat weights 16,000lbs empty. I estimate 18,000 with anchors, fuel, crew,etc. I'm only thinking of this now because a friend had to be towed and it cost over $800. Please let me know what you think and any alternatives are greatly appreciated. Thank you for your time and ideas. Andi
     
    Last edited: Jul 30, 2011
  2. sharpii2
    Joined: May 2004
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    Location: Michigan, USA

    sharpii2 Senior Member

    Yes, it will move the boat.

    But you will have less than one horsepower per ton (engines almost never put out the hp advertised. At least not continuously)

    It will only move the boat in a dead calm and little or no current and probably at less than 5 kts.

    In anything but a dead calm, you might consider using it along with the mainsail, if you can keep the prop in the water as the boat heels. The engine will give you better controllability while the sail will make up for some of the hp deficiency.
     
  3. keysdisease
    Joined: Mar 2006
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    Location: South Florida USA

    keysdisease Senior Member

    Get a SeaTow or TowBoat US membership.

    A high thrust 10HP will move her much better than a regular 10HP.

    I took a quick look at Fuji 35, looks like mounting is going to be a challenge. Do you have an inflatable? If you always have crew you could do a hip tow pretty easy.

    Steve
     
  4. CatBuilder

    CatBuilder Previous Member

    My advice would be just as Keys says. Especially relying on doing a hip tow. That's the easiest way to move your boat to a safe spot in the ICW.

    Also, don't forget your anchor as a backup device. It may not get you anywhere in a hurry, but you'll be safe if you deploy it.

    Had a brand new Jenneau's Yanmar pack it in on a sailing course I was teaching a few years back. We were in a very busy, bifurcating narrow channel with current. I had the green crew quickly raise sail and sailed the boat over to a "triangle of shallow water" between the 3 channels that came together. I deployed the anchor at the right spot, drop sails and let her catch via wind and current.

    We held there just fine (rocks, a lot of traffic, a day marker all very close by) while we awaited Sea Tow to bring us up to the dock for repair work.

    Point is, don't forget the anchor is usually the easiest way to keep the boat safe and buy yourself some time during a propulsion failure.
     
  5. Harold Anderson
    Joined: Jul 2011
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    Location: Corpus Christi Texas

    Harold Anderson Junior Member

    What size outboard would I need to do a hip tow? Can I use a hard dinghy. We are looking for a 10footer that we can sail,row and power. Thanks for your help.
     
  6. CatBuilder

    CatBuilder Previous Member

    You will need a big outboard for the hip tow, as compared to one you might use on the proposed sailing/rowing (non-planing) dinghy. However, since you are planning on a non-planing dinghy, you could always get a 9.9high thrust unit for the dinghy, which would really work well moving your boat around too.

    The high thrust units develop their power at lower (non-planing) hull speeds, which is exactly what your rowing dinghy will be. It's way overkill on the dinghy, but will work great for a hip tow.
     
  7. keysdisease
    Joined: Mar 2006
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    Location: South Florida USA

    keysdisease Senior Member

    Yes, but you will need some 10 or 12" dia fenders and careful placement and a watch underway, they have a way of moving around while doin a hip tow.

     
  8. rasorinc
    Joined: Nov 2007
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    Location: OREGON

    rasorinc Senior Member

  9. Harold Anderson
    Joined: Jul 2011
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    Location: Corpus Christi Texas

    Harold Anderson Junior Member

    Thank you for the ideas and experience. We are going to buy or build a 10 foot hard dinghy to hip tow our boat with a high output 9.9 outboard. The dinghy must be able to sail well and be rowed, powered and towed. Any suggestions on dinghy plans. I would prefer stitch and glue as I am not an expereinced woodworker. Again thanks to all who helped me. Harold Anderson
     
  10. CatBuilder

    CatBuilder Previous Member

    bateau.com has some decent little plans... I suppose. You will find many plans and some kits for this size boat.
     
  11. BATAAN
    Joined: Apr 2010
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    Location: USA

    BATAAN Senior Member

    Here is an 11' rowing, sailing, motoring dinghy design of mine that has stood the test of time. I use a 2 hp Honda and it goes at hull speed. I tried a 5 horse and it was too much. Putting a 9.9 on would be gross overkill and unusable at anything over 1/4 throttle, but it would tow a train!
    This skiff was based on the Auray dinghy in Claud Worth, but modified for sailing and motoring. It sails very well, rows like a dream, is the best beach skiff I've ever had. The odd bow is perfect for reserve buoyancy and landing on beaches. Pulling the bow up on a float makes it very easy to load. Build is stitch and glue, no frames, lapped sides, glassed bottom for chafe resistance.
     

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  12. Delane
    Joined: Apr 2005
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    Location: Okinawa, Japan

    Delane Senior Member

    Been there done that, well my friend did before I owned the boat. He was in the process of replacing the 3GM in the V-berth and mounted a 9.9 I worked great in light seas and in harbors. Moved us along at about 4 knots in light air with relatively flat seas.
     
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