Safest way to get from NZ to Perth?

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by wmonastra, Sep 14, 2008.

  1. wmonastra
    Joined: Jun 2006
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    wmonastra Junior Member

    Work is now being done on my new yacht, and im now starting the plan a trip for next year. Im wanting to go visit family in Perth and then towards Europe from there. Which route do i go?

    A) Down past Stewart Island towards Hobart and round the bottom of Aust?

    OR

    B) Sail past Wellington (NZ) towards Sydney,Melbourne etc and up round the top. (This one to me seems more dangerous as you get further towards Asia your at more of a risk of attacks from pirates?

    Any advice.

    *Please note i will be doing a shakedown trip of around the Sth Island of NZ first.


    Thanks
     
  2. rwatson
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    Location: Tasmania,Australia

    rwatson Senior Member

    If this is a first trip, you are better to go through Bass Strait so you have Melbourne and Launceston as a safety ports, rather than the SW of tassie where there is nothing at all but big cold water.

    Then do a leg to Adelaide, and then you can try for Perth.

    Dont do the Brisbane, Darwin route unless you leave after March next year, as the "wet" will have started with big winds by the time you get there.

    Going to Perth via the north is nowhere near "pirate country". You might get mobbed by street peddlars if you get blown to Ambon, or menaced by Thursday Islanders if you catch fish illegally at Cape York.

    In both cases, you will likely be in for a lot of upwind work, so I hope you have a good boat.

    What size and style of boat is it? Post some pictures
     
  3. masalai
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    masalai masalai

    1 - - - visit "the coastal passage" and read EVERYTHING http://www.thecoastalpassage.com/ particularly the "bureaucratic thought police" and rules of importation of a boat, immigration and all the **** we inherited from that despot Johnny Howard....
    2 - - - Seriously consider flying instead?
    3 - - - Take your time (if immigration and the thought police allow (in writing) and head up via the barrier reef (inshore route) to do the tropics (north of Capricorn) in winter (not during the "Cyclone Season" - November to April?) then be careful heading south on the west coast as the fronts that whip up as far north as NW cape are painful and the Abhrolis are scarey then...
     
  4. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

    Yeah - that customs business is bad news in Joh Bjelke land.

    You would get a much more civilised reception in the southern states. And you would be able to go for a swim free from stingers.
     
  5. masalai
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    masalai masalai

    and turn your custom jewels into icicles? get a blow job from the Antarctic gales, get blown back to NZ...... and no sheep to keep one warm? - the Victorians ate them all - cannibals....
     
  6. Meanz Beanz
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    Meanz Beanz Boom Doom Gloom Boom

    Jeez Mas then with an avatar like that you better stay away from VIC and NZ else you'll be eaten or....

    Seriously... wouldn't a seasonally timed trip across the top be far more interesting than sailing the wrong way across the bight?
     
  7. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

    maybe - but he would have to wait till March next year. The "work on his boat" was probably promised by the end of september, that will drag out to mid October, 3 weeks to sort the gear and supplies out, the usual bun fight with crews, the shakeout cruise, the repairs and re-organisation from the shakeout cruise, - lets see - aussie bound by mid November. By the time he gets to the tropics its all stingers and cyclones ....

    And the obvious reason - a slight difference in distance. Only a half of a continent instead of 3/4's, as he is coming from Christchurch, not Auckland.

    If he waits for a High to approach tassie, he will have a southeasterly to blow him to melbourne in a broad reach. Then two tacks across the bight to perth.

    Jeez, the thought of picking my way through the bommies with a big blow from asia hard on the nose just doesnt cut it for me.

    Then of course there is the Queenslanders .... shudder. At least one of them had the decency to warn you monsta! :)
     
  8. masalai
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    masalai masalai

    Ahhhh you mesicans are all bluster and frozen nuts - don't you know yeti that across the bite is the opposite way that the wind blows - - a case of "pushing **** uphill with a pointy stick" - - but then you obviously feel right at home doing that, and maybe, by the time you get to WA you will be nice and kleen as well as desexed (NO NUTS)

    Sharks swim in the southern waters - bloody big white pointers - wot love a bit of long pig....
     
  9. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

    hahaha mas - yeah those big whites love a bit of lamb allright.

    Luckily there is a lot of water between them. They wont go further north due to the stonefish, crocodiles, stingers, coral poisoning, 6 metres tides and cyclones.

    Talk about pushing the proverbial up hill - have you done the Darwin to Perth route lately? Against prevailing trade winds, ducking in and out between all the rocky reefs, being smashed to pieces by the Indian ocean. The only refuge for really bad weather is some rough anchorages with 7 metre tides.

    Makes the Bight look like a mill pond, and at least you have Warnambool, Adelaide and a few other stops to pull in at.

    Dont listen to the bad man Monsta - he just wants the customs fees and the tourist dollars. I will send you my bank account details for your gratefull donation for some truly good advice :)
     
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2008
  10. masalai
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    masalai masalai

    Yes the big tidal leg, - - Darwin to Dampier ('cause Port Hedland is a shithole) but around Broom is sort of interesting for a beachable cat, - - do in southern winter, autumn is Qld and the waiting place is Brisbane then watch your timing sailing down to Perth for those cold fronts get a bit whip-like sometimes but I would NEVER GO WEST ACROSS THE BOTTOM and EAST only if you are mad....
     
  11. Bruce Woods
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    Bruce Woods Senior Member



    You are displaying you ignorance here Masalai. All summer long the great Australian bight is swept by easterlies as the centre of the highs moves south into the southern ocean. Having completed three loops of oz in small sailboats in both directions I reckon the east to west across the bottom is the way to go as only a masochist is going to sail these water in any season other than high summer. My preference is the bash though the south easterly trades down the Queensland coast as the reef certainly stops the swell unlike for the corresponding section on the west coast from Exmouth to Geraldton.

    The east coast current also provides a welcome bonus for the clockwise sailor. Check out geoff toghills book on circumnavigating australia for seasonal weather patterns.
     
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  12. masalai
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    masalai masalai

    My point is, it is COLD (the water) using the southern route across the bight, and fighting to go west from NZ (as per this thread topic), AGAINST the prevailing wind, is a pain in the arse that can be avoided....

    or running before it in the hope that a front does not come up and give one a hard time if one is attempting to run before the flow back to the eastern states is for a sadomasochist who is well insured (life and family support after) and who loves "fighting the elements" go the southern route. I would suggest that a sane and careful cruiser would opt for the northern route, enjoy the scenery and have lots of safe havens into which one can seek shelter....

    Even if I sailed south of Bunbury - to acquire some of the wines from the Margaret River area - to go back home (eastern states), I would go via the top end... I had a farm, in from Busselton, and used to sail at some of the Busselton YC events from a base at PFS (Court 650 & 750) in the late 70's.... Uni student, computer consultant and farmer as well as weekend sailor - hectic but fun times....
     
  13. Kaptin-Jer
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    Kaptin-Jer Semi-Pro

    Just fly
     
  14. masalai
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    masalai masalai

    That makes 3 advocating flying (one anyone except Quaintarse) hehehe
     

  15. MikeJohns
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    MikeJohns Senior Member

    There appears to be some misinformation here, and I agree with Bruce some ignorance.


    As Bruce says the prevailing winds are variable in direction in the 40's in summer the high pressure systems move well south and shifts the strong westerly belt out of the equation.
    Also it isn't that cold its quite hot at times (there is a lot of hot air around) and you can be in the middle of the Bight in a 35 deg C Northerly dripping . The water's refreshing and warm enough to swim in often around 15 deg C.

    Farewell spit (depart Nelson) to Perth will take 20-25 days of sailing, the faster NZ to Perth route is to depart Bluff and then head direct to Melbourne eastern route of Tasmania, then coastal to Port Lincoln. PL to Albany will take about 6 days then you are all but there. This is always the preffered route from Hobart heading west. It is a fun route to sail.

    The southern Tasman is prone to be a bit sloppy with big leftover swells from different directions this can be a right pain if there is no wind.

    A quick look at the passage planner and wind roses will tell you a lot. Although I have sailed Freenmantle to Melbourne in May and had the wind on the nose nearly all the way, in summer the closer you get to the coast (safety allowing) the more likely you are to get a good sea breeze, this can be a boon on low wind days and adds a big interest factor for those aboard.

    Another option is ChCh Auckland then lord Howe-Eden then Melbourne PL. Albany this takes the southern Tasman out and adds 5 days in return for calmer seas. But it depends on the boat and the crew of course.

    cheers
     
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