S glass

Discussion in 'Materials' started by Tungsten, Nov 19, 2013.

  1. Tungsten
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    Tungsten Senior Member

    I tried running a search on S glass,no go,not enough words it says?
    I'm sure there's info on it,what else can I type into the search function?

    I notice that its only available in woven,is there a reason why you can't get it in stiched style?

    Also could you use an all S glass layup on cored foam construction?
     
  2. lewisboats
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    lewisboats Obsessed Member

  3. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Sglass is an odd ball...not many people use it so its not stocked.

    http://shop.fiberglasssupply.com/Carbon_and_Kevlar_Fabric-SA090_9oz_x_24.html


    https://www.acpsales.com/Fiberglass-Non-Woven-Fabrics.html


    Ask your composites supplier. Vectorply is a name I see often

    Can you use s glass ? Dont know...ive only used sglass fabric as a high resistance sheathing. Its tougher than eglass and not messy like kevlar.

    Best ask a composites guy
     
  4. Eric Sponberg
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    Eric Sponberg Senior Member

    Technically, "S-glass" is the US military version of fiberglass. As such, it must meet rigorous standards of testing. Any "S-glass" that does not meet the US Mil specs is therefore relegated to the commercial market as "S-2 glass". Therefore, your searches should be for S-2 glass.

    S-2 glass can be used anywhere you would use the more typical E-glass. S-2 glass is about twice as strong and twice as stiff as E-glass for about the same weight.


    I hope that helps.

    Eric
     
  5. Tungsten
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    Tungsten Senior Member

    I have found some reasonably priced S glass,question how will I know it is truly S glass?Some sort of test or can you tell by looking at it?
     
  6. Eric Sponberg
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    Eric Sponberg Senior Member

    You have to look at the shipping label. S-2 glass looks exactly like E-glass. The only other way is to laminate some, do some tensile tests, and see if the results look typical for S-2 glass. That is, you really have to trust your supplier and make sure the product has the proper documentation.

    Eric
     
  7. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    S glass cloth...the only s glass ive handled, is a slightly milky colour compared to eglass.

    When the two are side by side you can tell the sglass.

    In the end you must trust your supplier.

    Ask him who produced the cloth then reference it on the internet

    Why are you choosing sglass ?

    Properly compacted and impregnated eglass has very good mechanical properties.

    Many times its better and cheaper to raise your skill at laminating and curing eglass
     
  8. Tungsten
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    Tungsten Senior Member

    OK great thanks,

    Michael the price is right and from what I read on here its a better choice then Kevlar much cheaper also.My goal is to get as light as possible and still be able to bang off a river rock or two.

    My skills are getting better,just another 5 boats or so and I'll have it almost figured out.

    Cheers.
     
  9. Milehog
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    Milehog Clever Quip

    Eric, which resins would compliment S glass's strengths?
     
  10. ondarvr
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    ondarvr Senior Member

    Like any other product, it depends on how much you want to spend. Epoxy would be the best, but VE and polyester would cost less...sort of.

    What type of boat is this, and how do you plan to abuse it?
     
  11. Milehog
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    Milehog Clever Quip

    I don't have any projects right now.
    There are conflicting accounts of S glass's characteristics floating about. Or probably I don't understand the data in front of me. Does it's higher tensile strength affect it's resilience or fatigue resistance?
    I assume any ol' goo should hold it together but I'm just curious about what it likes.
     
  12. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Is it brittle ?

    Dont know.

    ButThe first time you use it to sheath a surface...let the epoxy cure semi hard, then attempt to trim the sglass over hangs, you will think that your razor knife is dull...pop in a new blade and then you realize that sglass is difficult to cut compared to eglass cloth.

    This means better abrasion resistance.

    Purchase a piece and experiment...
     
  13. redreuben
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    redreuben redreuben

    I used it on one project years ago but mostly my knowledge of it is "academic".
    S glass's greatest strength relative to other materials is it's strength in compression and resistance to abrasion.
    It's downsides are cost, it does not cure as clear as eglass so is less suitable for bright finishes over timber, but that also depends on the weave. Some Sglass weaves are also very tight and you may have wet out issues hand laminating.
    If you are using it over timber, use epoxy. If using it with foam I would think Vinylester or epoxy. Depending on what you seek from the fabric I doubt wether polyester will compliment the fabric, whats the point if the resin system fails before the fabric has had the chance to perform what it does best ? Talk to suppliers and users.

    Do your homework on what you are getting, talk to suppliers and users alike. I would ask suppliers to refer you to some of their commercial customers and talk to them about suitable material for your project/skill level.

    Some pages that may interest you;

    http://www.oneoceankayaks.com/Abrasion.htm

    http://sweetcomposites.com/Fiberglass.html

    http://www.lbie.com/n3111.htm

    http://www.solarcomposites.com

    http://www.uscomposites.com/cloth.html#sglass

    On each of these sites have a look around, all sorts of interesting stuff !
    Cheers,
    RR
     
  14. jonr
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    jonr Senior Member

    uscomposites says:

    "S-Glass will has the same working qualities as a standard E-glass, however you will gain an approximate 25-30% increase in breaking strength."

    Others say 40%. I've never heard twice as strong.
     
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  15. Eric Sponberg
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    Eric Sponberg Senior Member

    I should recheck my sources before talking off the top of my head. I stand corrected, and you are closer to the truth than I am. Sorry about that.

    Eric
     
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