S&G over permanent frames/bulkheads?

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by liki, Aug 14, 2011.

  1. liki
    Joined: Nov 2008
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    Location: Finland

    liki Senior Member

    I am interested on possibilities to use S&G construction over permanent bulkheads, or taped chines on planking over traditional plank-on-frame framing.

    I know that there exists construcion methods that either remove the framing for taping the chines, or tape the chine in-between framing in small sections for small boats. Do you think taping only in-between framing would be adequate for a semi-planing/planing light design of 4,5m LOA?
     
  2. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    It makes absolutely no sense to use partial taped seam building methods on a plank on frame build. You'll just waste a lot of goo, for very little benefit. Similarly, the same logic applies if you have a taped seam build and burdening it with plank on frame methods.

    If you're going to build a taped seam boat, then plank over bulkheads and furniture is usually all that's necessary, of course assuming good encapsulation techniques are employed.

    If you're building a plank on frame boat, then locking down various areas with goo will probably cause more issues then is solves and the advice would be to just build a plank on frame boat.

    The reason you shouldn't "mix and match" methods is, one relies on all the structural elements becoming a monocoque shell, while the plank on frame method uses individual structural elements, that share local loading, typically with a fair bit of movement expected in the process. The two methods are exclusive to each other and don't work well if combined.

    In short, build what the plans call for or make the full conversion from one to the other.
     
  3. liki
    Joined: Nov 2008
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    liki Senior Member

    PAR, I agree with you but there are no plans per se, I am only drawing them yet. A little bit at a time, it is a hobby project of mine.

    Yes, it could well be that it wouldn't make sense with plank-on-frame framing, sawn and gusseted frames in this case. That would leave me to figure out a way to stitch the panels over permanent bulkheads, without having to remove them later. What I'd like to avoid is re-fitting each internal piece after taping. Construction of a PT skiff from pt watercraft is quite like I am after.
     

  4. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    If you understand the process well enough, none of the molds need to be removed after you've completed your taped. In fact, these molds then become bulkheads, air chamber partitions, furniture supports, etc.
     
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