Rub Rail Removal and Replacement

Discussion in 'Fiberglass and Composite Boat Building' started by grady, Nov 20, 2006.

  1. grady
    Joined: Oct 2006
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    Location: Scituate, Ma

    grady Novice

    Hey Guys
    I'm considering the removal of my 20 yr old rub rail to facilatate an easier refinishing of the hull. I believe the part is still available from the manufacturer, if so, is this a good idea? Do I reuse the same screw holes? The boat is a Grady White an I'm pretty sure they bonded the joint with more than one method so compromisizing the integraty of it, Isn't a question.
     
  2. rturbett
    Joined: Aug 2005
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    Location: FINGER LAKES, NY

    rturbett Senior Member

    If you are putting on a new rub rail, my experience from doing it once says fill the old screwholes and drilling for new ones. Also, a new rub rail will really make your new finish stand out.
    Rob
     
  3. grady
    Joined: Oct 2006
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    Location: Scituate, Ma

    grady Novice

    I just priced out the part and it is still available, and very reasonable as well.
    So I guess I'll remove the old and see where it takes me. I would like to think that it's a fairly easy install keeping in mind that I shouldn't have to be too concerned with the hull lines, I'm guessing that the rail will self center on the joint.

    Grady
     
  4. mobjack68
    Joined: Jul 2006
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    Location: Western East Virginia

    mobjack68 Junior Member

    Hey Grady, I will assume you have at least pulled part of the rail apart? I have seen 2 basic types of rails installed...one rubber with a rope filler and the other aluminum with a rubber filler, the filler covers the fasteners. For the most part, the decks are designed to "slip" over the top edge of the hull...that is, the deck lip fits over the outside of the hull so the fasteners actually attach thru the rail and both parts of the boat. I hope you have already discovered this and the reason for the info is this. As you disassemble the rail from the hull, do it in sections left/right bow/stern, SOMETIMES the manufacturer does not "glue" the two pieces of the boat together. Most high end boats are glued, some rather expensive boats I have worked on relied on the rail fasteners to hold the boat together, the rail provided a tidy way to hide the fasteners. I have seen wood screws, nuts and bolts and pop rivets used for the mechanical end. I would strongly recommend filling the old holes and redrilling AND if adhesive/sealant is not present between the deck and the hull ADD SOME...
    good luck
    mobjack68
     
  5. grady
    Joined: Oct 2006
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    Location: Scituate, Ma

    grady Novice

    I have not started this project. I try to wait too see if I have the information, stock and tools I'll need to complete the task successfully. Not that it always goes as planed.

    But I will take it slow and make sure there is some other type of fastening system in place.

    Thanks for the Heads up

    Grady
     
  6. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    This boat has butyl rubber behind the rub and is screwed, with rivets at the ends and possibly at the corners of the transom too. I'm not 100% sure if his shell is bonded to the deck cap, but I am pretty sure it is. Grady, get more rail then you need and cut to length after you've bent it. Take a good look at the bends (bow and transom) and decide if you can make them as nice as what was done by the manufacture. It's not hard to bend, but the corners can cause some cussing. Fill the old holes, they will not be reliable enough for new fasteners. Re-bed in polysulfide (3M 101 or similar). This isn't a one man job so get some helpers to hold the thing up, it gets a bit unwieldy, until a few fasteners go in and it calms down. Stand well back from the boat and "eye ball" the line. It's easy to screw up the sweep of the sheer, unless you stand back and have a good look see. Up close you'll never see a dip or hump in the rub, but 60' back it'll stick out like a sore thumb.
     
  7. grady
    Joined: Oct 2006
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    Location: Scituate, Ma

    grady Novice

    Thanks PAR Your a wealth of information.

    I'll be regarding your advice very highly on all topics.

    We have been enjoying some mild weather up here in the North east. So I just removed the old powerplant friday, ( which I'm giving to my paint spraying friend ) And now I'm starting to strip the steering, trim pump, wire harness transom assembly etc. So I've keeping busy.

    Thanks again.

    Grady
     
  8. rturbett
    Joined: Aug 2005
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    Location: FINGER LAKES, NY

    rturbett Senior Member

    I used a heat gun - carefully- to help put a bend in the rubber rail. I did my project in the early spring, and the cold weather stiffened the rail and made it very hard to work with. Keep an eye on the weather!
    Rob
     
  9. grady
    Joined: Oct 2006
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    Location: Scituate, Ma

    grady Novice

    Thanks rturbett, this task will be completed after refinishing of the hullsides.
    so with any luck, it will be late spring early summer ( I hope ).

    Thanks

    Grady
     
  10. Martin B
    Joined: Nov 2006
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    Location: USA

    Martin B Junior Member

    You would be hard pressed to try and re use the same holes. If one happens to line up though you should be fine to re use it. Make certain to use an adhesive caulk and not silicone. The first time you hit the dock the silicone will break loose but a good adhesive caulk will hold. I use 5200 and I put a squirt into each screw hole as I am installing. Also it can be used to fill holes that are not going to be used.



    www.bowkersfiberglass.com
     
  11. grady
    Joined: Oct 2006
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    Location: Scituate, Ma

    grady Novice

    just got confirmation on availability. Will order soon.

    Thanks


    Grady
     

  12. lacasmarine
    Joined: Dec 2006
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    Location: gainesville , ga

    lacasmarine Junior Member

    I would fill you old screw holes
    mask the new rail with tape..
    dry fit the new rubrail drilling new holes as needed.
    use heat gun for bends at transom (if your rub rail has a insert cut a small piece of insert to slid in where it bends around the corner use the heat gun to bend .so as not to mis-shapen the track that the insert fit in too.)
    drill new holes as you go.
    bed the screws in 101.(don't over tight the screws as it will got you a bumpy or wavey rail.)
    mask off the deck if new paint.
    run a bead of 101 along the seam.
    clean up and remove tape.
     
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