rowing shell help needed

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by guzzis3, Aug 26, 2014.

  1. guzzis3
    Joined: Nov 2009
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    Location: Brisbane

    guzzis3 Senior Member

    Hi all,

    I know this is probably the wrong place but I've been on this forum for years and have had no luck finding what I'm looking for.

    I've been sailing for years but just got back into rowing. Bought a recreational rowing shell and loving it.

    I am in Brisbane, queensland australia and I'm looking for

    Sources of parts, specifically grips for my timber sculling oars. Also second hand oars locally...

    A rowing forum, preferably in aus, where I can ask stupid questions :)

    Information on sliding riggers. I'm thinking of getting a surf ski (the 18' long type) and building an experimental sliding rigger on it. From what I've read getting the slides right is the issue but I'd love some more detail from someone who's tried it.

    Feeling a bit lost. I used to love rowing dinghys when I was a kid and I'm just loving this old sliding seat shell, 16' by 2', but I know basically nothing about these type of row boats..

    Help ?

    Your patience and thoughts appreciated.
     
  2. NoEyeDeer
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    NoEyeDeer Senior Member

  3. upchurchmr
    Joined: Feb 2011
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    Location: Ft. Worth, Tx, USA

    upchurchmr Senior Member

    There was a short thread on the same sliding Rigger idea here: http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthread.php?180681-Sliding-rigger-rowing

    There have been several previous threads where the sliding rigger popped up either in boatdesign or wooden boat forums. Sorry I've lost track of the names.

    I built a sliding rigger for a 11' boat which worked well, similar to the Virus website in the thread above.
    Timo and I had a PM conversation. If you are interested I could forward that info to you.

    The sliding rigger worked great, almost no weight transfer during the stroke leaving the boat level with no diving.

    Marc
     
  4. guzzis3
    Joined: Nov 2009
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    Location: Brisbane

    guzzis3 Senior Member

    Thank you both for your replies.

    NoEyeDeer

    My shell is a RECREATIONAL rowing shell like an alden 16 and other similar boats. It's 2' wide and made for old folks like me who just want to mess about on the river, not row competitively.

    http://rowalden.com/product/alden-16/

    Mine is similar but not exactly the same.

    IMO these are nicer things:

    http://www.edon.biz/

    and cheaper to boot :) I put some trainer wheels on mine for when I fluff my exit...

    upchurchmr

    I would appreciate your forwarding info to me. My sykes is lightly built and taking a beating on the river near my home. It's got a lot of logs and stuff.... I was thinking of getting an old surf ski:

    http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/Ocean-su...g_Water_Sports_Watercraft&hash=item3ce6c582dc

    These can be had for about $100. I can't make a hull for that so I thought trying to build a sliding rigger on top of it might be worthwhile. I could probably design it so if the hull breaks I can just swap it across. I hadn't seen the oarmaster version. I might ask them about it. Shipping to australia might be a killer...
     
  5. guzzis3
    Joined: Nov 2009
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    Location: Brisbane

    guzzis3 Senior Member

    Last week I bought another boat. It's a 26' single scull, ply. I bought it mainly for the carbon croker oars, and paid $250 plus about $50 in petrol (it was a distance away).

    I'm going to try to sell the shell on. While it rows beautifully I have to load and unload it on the roof racks twice every time I go out so it's too much trouble.

    The oars are lovely. Clever blades. There is one problem though, the handles overlap a LOT. Is there any rules of thumb on how much sculling oars should overlap ? I'd like to set my oars so there in only an inch or 2 of overlap. These have about 4 - 5 inches...very uncomfortable...
     
  6. upchurchmr
    Joined: Feb 2011
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    Location: Ft. Worth, Tx, USA

    upchurchmr Senior Member

    Aren't the oars adjustable for overlap?
    The ones I own have collars which are adjustable to set the position of the handles.

    Of course, if your oarlocks are positioned a lot narrower than normal it might not have enough adjustment.

    I believe the handles are replaceable, so if necessary you might be able to shorten the length to get the handles where you want them.
    This would vary the ratio of the inboard to outboard lengths and add resistance to the handles.

    I really like cleavers, they are so much easier to use than spoon blades. Almost automatic for blade positioning.

    Mine are set for about 1 to 1 1/2" overlap.
     
  7. guzzis3
    Joined: Nov 2009
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    Location: Brisbane

    guzzis3 Senior Member

    Thank you for that.

    Mine were about 5" or something. My hands were not one above the other they were actually crossed. I undid the stops and slid (slided?) the collars up about 4", now I've got about 1 1/2 inches overlap. This was actually a bit too little so I'll adjust them again. I am not sure if I've got the angle right though between the flats on the collars and the blades. I assume the blades should be dead vertical when the flats are in the pull position ?

    Agree 100% about the cleaver blades. Used the timber oars today with the scoops, just not at all as nice as the others. I fluffed a stroke and ended up in the river :)

    Again thank you for your help.
     
  8. upchurchmr
    Joined: Feb 2011
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    upchurchmr Senior Member

    When you set the blade angle, be sure the top is angled slightly toward you.
    If you get it the other way the blade dives in the water, its hard to pull it out on the recovery.

    I prefer a couple of degrees leaned toward you for safety.
     
  9. Leo Lazauskas
    Joined: Jan 2002
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    Location: Adelaide, South Australia

    Leo Lazauskas Senior Member

    A long, long, time ago, way before the web we now use, there was Usenet.

    The best advice on rowing I have read over many years comes from Carl
    Douglas, an engineer and builder of rowing shells. I think you will be
    well rewarded if you trawl through the Usenet group rec.sport.rowing
    https://groups.google.com/forum/?fromgroups#!forum/rec.sport.rowing

    Another good resource, although it is primarly concerned with Olympic
    rowing and biomechanics, is Valery Kleshnev's series of monthly notes:
    http://www.biorow.com/
     
  10. guzzis3
    Joined: Nov 2009
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    Location: Brisbane

    guzzis3 Senior Member

    Thank you for the replies.

    I found a guide on crokers site. It's brief but it will do to get me started.

    I will read over the links when I get time. Thank you for that.
     

  11. daiquiri
    Joined: May 2004
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    Location: Italy (Garda Lake) and Croatia (Istria)

    daiquiri Engineering and Design

    Very interesting and informative site! Thanks, Leo! :)
     
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