Rowboat

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by tinhorn, Apr 29, 2010.

  1. tinhorn
    Joined: Jan 2008
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    Location: Massachusetts South Shore.

    tinhorn Senior Member

    I picked up this cute little fiberglass rowboat which needs some repairs. Upon close examination, the hull design seems to be what you guys-in-the-know refer to as a planing hull (based upon where the transom meets the bottom). Having enjoyed many bad habits over my long life, I really doubt if I will ever get this thing to plane, particularly with the cheap plastic oars that came with it.

    So would it make sense to round off that rear edge in order to make rowing easier? (See pic.) Seems to me that the water would flow easier around a rounded edge than the current Kammback-inspired design.
     

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  2. marshmat
    Joined: Apr 2005
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    marshmat Senior Member

    Hi Tinhorn,

    A photo or two of the whole boat would be nice. Preferably as close as you can get to a true profile view (from the side).

    I think I see evidence of an outboard engine having once been mounted.... and the shape does not look like pure rowboat to me.

    Rebuilding the thing with a round joint between the bottom and the transom doesn't strike me as a useful or beneficial modification.
     
  3. tinhorn
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    tinhorn Senior Member

    Happy to oblige, Marshmat. I appreciate your advice. The previous owner used an electric trolling motor, but I bought it for the fun of rowing. (At least I anticipate that it will be fun.)
     

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  4. alan white
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    alan white Senior Member

    A question concerning your problem getting up to planing speed, not to embarrass you... which end of the oars are you using?
     
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  5. marshmat
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    marshmat Senior Member

    With a small gas engine, that boat could probably get on plane.

    Under oars, it's going to be a leisurely trip, three or four knots maybe. There's not much you can do to modify it to be a faster rowboat. It'll probably be a good load carrier and pretty stable, but not fast.
     
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  6. terhohalme
    Joined: Jun 2003
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    Location: Kotka, Finland

    terhohalme BEng Boat Technology

    Oh, yes, rowing CAN be fun.
     

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  7. messabout
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    Location: Lakeland Fl USA

    messabout Senior Member

    Terho; your picture shows a boat that is ideally suited for its job. It appears to have simple construction. I like it. It looks to me like the oarsman is too close to the oarlock pivot points. The starboard oar appears to have made a stroke but the boat does not seem to be moving. Tell us more.

    Tinhorn; cute little boat. You will enjoy rowing it until you try a boat more nearly intended for rowing. Then you'll have to have one of that type. Rowing can be addictive.
     
  8. terhohalme
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    terhohalme BEng Boat Technology

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  9. terhohalme
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    terhohalme BEng Boat Technology

    Sorry tinhorn,

    I didn't think to hijack your thread. Having a small digny like yours, was the main fun for me and my brother some decade ago in summertime.

    To your question, rounding the transom as in your picture doesn't add any good for rowing experience, just ruin a solid wessel. Remember to keep the boat light when rowing.
     
  10. messabout
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    messabout Senior Member

    Nor do I wish to hijack the thread. We are not doing so intentionally and the scrumptious Finlander boat will give Tinhorn something to dream about. Rowing his little tender will be fun for a while and, as is normal, the oarsman will start to think about a better boat. Sailors and power boater are frequently afflicted with the same malady.

    Looks like that boat is an OOG (oar on gunnel) type. Very fine entry and the picture, perhaps distorting the true shape, seems to make the after end more full. It appears to have a flat section in the bottom that blends with wide angular chine planks. The video shows the boat making precious little wake. Altogether lovely. Must I come to Finland to get one of those?
     
  11. terhohalme
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    terhohalme BEng Boat Technology

    The builder is planning to sell kits. The rumour tells also that some of our boats will possible be build near NY.
     

  12. tinhorn
    Joined: Jan 2008
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    tinhorn Senior Member

    No worries about hijacking as long as you offer 1) a good piece of advice, or 2) an interesting picture.

    That guy does look like he's in a bit of an awkward position. Y'know, it seems odd that rowers in general sit in their boats backwards. I much prefer to see where I'm going, particularly with all the rocks and junk in my river when the tide goes out.
     
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