Rowboat pics and approx. cost

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by astevens, Nov 10, 2013.

  1. astevens
    Joined: Oct 2013
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    Location: arroyo grande

    astevens Junior Member

    Would you guys and gals mind posting some rowboats that you have built as well as the estimated cost to build. Even if you have not built it yet but have a dream rowboat in mind I'd love see some pics of the design. I'd like to build a boat that is very detailed and challenging to keep me busy for a while on the weekends. thanks... oh and also, how much would a trailer cost to make?
     
  2. upchurchmr
    Joined: Feb 2011
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    upchurchmr Senior Member

    Do you have any requirements?
    I keep wanting to build Dave Gentry's Ruth, but it should be a lot cheaper than something strip planked and still cheaper than a traditional built boat (that's inviting abuse - I just don't really know).

    1 person or 2 or with a passanger
    Dory, or something round bottomed, or shell like
    I assume wood but strip planked, lapstrake, SOF, etc
     
  3. NoEyeDeer
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    NoEyeDeer Senior Member

    How detailed and how challenging? Those are relative terms. ;)

    Also, have you any idea of what sort of work you are going to enjoy doing? A lot of "simplified" boats get rid of things that some people find intimidating but I personally find enjoyable (like planing rolling bevels, for instance) and substitute jobs that I totally hate (like filleting and internal glassing). However, the people that build such boats seem to like them. It comes down to preference. If you're building it for fun, choose work that will be fun. My 2c. :)

    I'm in the process of buiding a rowboat at the moment. Haven't kept exact tabs on the cost, and it will depend on local prices anyway. My guess it that it will come in around $800 all up, but then some things I was able to make out of stuff I had lying around anyway (old timber and ply for strongback, steambox, etc). If I had to buy everything, say around a grand at current east coast Australian prices.

    Pic is the boat framed up. Bottom will be going on today. Boat is exactly 19' long, and 3' 10" feet wide at the sheer (plus gunwales). Waterline is 18' 8" long and a smidgeon under 27" wide.
     

    Attached Files:

  4. NoEyeDeer
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    NoEyeDeer Senior Member

    Do it. Ruth is really nice, and should be cheap and easy to build. :)
     
  5. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    There are a lot of designs to choose from. Have a look at some of John Gardener's work. He has a book with dozens of plan sets in it, so the book price (not much) will pay for itself, the moment you build one. Chapelle has quite a few in his assorted books as well many others, some that specialize in just human powered craft. Though I'm not big on hand propelled craft, I have a few designs in this area too.

    You should think about the build method, as some are more rewarding, then others. For example you can do a lapstrake build which produces, probably the best looking little boat, but the traditional method is tedious, with lots of steam bent ribs and plank fitting. On the other hand a glued lapstrake build can eliminate much of this effort, usually being sanitary of ribs all together. It all depends on what you want. In this vain, you might like the tedium, in which case maybe a strip planked build will satisfy or possibly a molded hull.

    Check out Glen-L.com and Bateau.com and have a look at some of their traditional and non-traditional pulling boat designs. Refine your desires a bit, so you can narrow down the search.
     
  6. astevens
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    astevens Junior Member

  7. upchurchmr
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    upchurchmr Senior Member

    astevens,

    That boat is 10' long.
    Ruth is 18'

    Buy a used trailer. I got one with a trashed Hobie cat and had to give it away, no one would buy it for $150.
     
  8. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Also try Atkinsboatplans.com for other designs.

    Rowing a 10' is generally painful, mostly because they need to be pretty fat to support a load, which isn't what you want in a pulling boat. Consider 14', instead of 10' as a minimum. If you can take on a longer boat, the better, maybe a Herreshoff row boat or maybe a Whitehall, possibly a Pea Pod.

    A Pea Pod:
    [​IMG]

    A Herreshoff row boat:
    [​IMG]

    A WhiteHall:
    [​IMG]

    Maybe something more European:
    [​IMG]

    Possably a dory:
    [​IMG]

    There are lots of choices, besides just length.
     
  9. astevens
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    astevens Junior Member

    Sorry, what I meant was that it looked narrow. I was thinking about a row boat that could sit multiple people at times. After a bit of research, I'd say between about 12 and 17 ft with a fairly wide beam... pretty dry even in choppy conditions. Not so much boat that I couldn't handle it by myself either. Saw this one too... looks neat
    http://www.stewartriver.com/rowingboats/goodskiff.html#
     
  10. astevens
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    astevens Junior Member

    thanks PAR those look neat. I like that whitehall 14
     
  11. astevens
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    astevens Junior Member

    Anyone know where I can get plans for culler's good little skiff? the more I look at it the more I think it is the one. can't seem to find them through google
     
  12. NoEyeDeer
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    NoEyeDeer Senior Member

    If you're into choppy conditions, a skiff like that (wide, flat bottom) will pound a bit when going into the waves. If that's going to bug you, you might be better off with something else.
     
  13. AnthonyW
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    AnthonyW Senior Member

    I am building (slowly) a rowing boat from Selway-Fisher's plans. Modified to take a bit of chop, broadened a bit - Windrush. 18ft.

    Take a look at Selway-Fishers plans - google them on the web - dozens to build of a huge variety of types, constructions (strip plank, frame, stitch and glue) etc. Windrush is my first build (addictive hobby...) and I am finding it very easy when I find time. Pretty boat too - though there are far prettier boats on Paul Fisher's website. Spend some time on his website. My boat in its early stages is there too.

    He also modifies his plans for use. He did this for me.
     
  14. NoEyeDeer
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    NoEyeDeer Senior Member

    That's an odd boat. It doesn't have enough beam at the sheer to be used without outriggers, yet it's too beamy for high performance. What's the rationale behind the hull form?
     

  15. DCockey
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    DCockey Senior Member

    Mystic Seaport has the plans of the original 13'6" Good Little Skiff in their Ships Plans Collection: http://mobius.mysticseaport.org/detail.php?t=objects&type=all&f=&s=culler&record=137
    Copies are available: http://www.mysticseaport.org/wp-content/uploads/SPorder_2013-07-15.pdf http://www.mysticseaport.org/research/requests/

    The drawings for the original 13'6" version are reproduced in small scale in Culler's Skiffs and Schooners on pp 62-63. The title on the drawings is 13'6" Sailing Skiff. I think the name "Good Little Skiff" came after the drawing was finished. The Good Little Skiff was originally designed for the first Small Craft Workshop at Mystic in June, 1971. Drawings of both the 13'6" and 15'6" versions are shown on p 52 and p 54 of Pete Culler's Boats by John Burke.
     
    Last edited: Nov 13, 2013
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