Rounding up whilst heading to wind

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by alienzdive, Oct 30, 2005.

  1. alienzdive
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    alienzdive Junior Member

  2. D'ARTOIS
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    D'ARTOIS Senior Member

    If you look closely at the underwater part of the hull than you will see where the problem is related to.

    To begin with, the design of skeg and rudder are not tyhat sophisticated and could be improved much - second to that, the rudder is on the small side and should have been more deeply (a longer and deeper blade). The way it is now, leads to quick cavitation.
     
  3. gggGuest
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    gggGuest ...

    Cavitation? I think not. Reckon that boat will be about35knots too slow for that to happen. I doubt you'll get ventilation under there either. Stall out, yes, doubtless that can happen.
     
  4. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Sharpies and other shallow draft boats use a rudder with a long balanced blade. It can be used at large angles of attack without stalling.
     

  5. D'ARTOIS
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    D'ARTOIS Senior Member

    Thanks Gonzo, that's what I mean.
     
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