Round bilge Wood plan

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by sn1987, May 19, 2017.

  1. sn1987
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    sn1987 Junior Member

    Hello to everyone,
    I'm trying to draw a wood plan of a 18 m boat (round bilge). For my lackness of experience I have some doubts about the correct rappresentation of the structure. Could you post me an extract of a detailed exemple wood plan?
    Thanks a lot
     
  2. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Are you trying to learn about the structural design of a wooden hull?
     
  3. sn1987
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    sn1987 Junior Member

    Yes, I do. If you have any suggest please let me know.
    Thanks
     
  4. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    You probably won't be able to learn about wooden structures simply by looking at a boat plan. Each design will require a structure engineered for the particular purpose. There are many variables. For example, the species of wood you will use. Other are the types of construction: cold molded, plank on steam bent frames or sawn frames, strip planked, etc. Start by narrowing down the type.
     
  5. sn1987
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    sn1987 Junior Member

    The material used is mahogany.
    The type of construction is plank on sawn frames.
    If you have any detailed wood plan it could be very useful for me. In this period I have the possibility to watch some real wood structures and compare them with the plans.
    Thank you in advance.
     
  6. TANSL
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    TANSL Senior Member

  7. sn1987
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    sn1987 Junior Member

    Thanks for answering. I've been seen the google search you indicated to me and think it is a very useful. Anyway if possible I need a more detailed longitudinal rappresentation. Could you help me in this way?
    Thanks
     
  8. TANSL
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    TANSL Senior Member

    I'm sorry but I do not have detailed plans for a wooden boat. In matters of body lines, hydrostatics, stability, scantlingss, etc, yes I can help you and I will do it with pleasure, if you need it.
     
  9. sn1987
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    sn1987 Junior Member

    Thanks for your kindless. Remaining in the matter of structure I need help for scantling calculation.
    In order to dimensioning the structure I thought to:

    1. Calculate the primary sollecitation due to difference between weight and hydrostatic thrust (shear force and bending moment in still water who act on hull girder)
    2. Calculate the local load acting on single girder, beam etc.

    For the point 1) I don't have particular problems.
    For the point 2) how can I calculate the maximum load (apart hydrostatic load) to correct define the sollecitation?
    What kind of calculation scheme I can use: direct calculation, considering less rigid beams fixed restrained in more rigid beams, or FEM calculation?
    Thanks and sorry for my english.
     
  10. TANSL
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    TANSL Senior Member

    In relation to the scantlings calculus, the most convenient thing is to apply the standards of a Classification Society or ISO 12215. All of them give you formulas to calculate the design pressures and the scantlings of each element of the structure. They also tell you how to calculate the longitudinal strength of the ship, using very clear formulas.
    I advise you , If you can, use the ISO standard.
     
  11. JSL
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    JSL Senior Member

    Check out Lloyd's Rules. Time proven
     
  12. sn1987
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    sn1987 Junior Member

    The ISO 12215 are applicable only for pleasure vessel, isn't it? For other types of boat (exemple small passenger ship) are them also applicable?
    Could link me the download page of Lloyd's Rules?
    Thanks
     
  13. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    You can find scantling rules in Skene's "Elements of Yacht Design" (he uses Herreshoff's rules mainly). Dave Gerr also uses a variation of those rules in an easier format. They are based on displacement.
     
  14. sn1987
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    sn1987 Junior Member

    Thank you guys
     

  15. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

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