Round bilge or chine ?

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by Oscarpp, Jul 13, 2020.

  1. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    A picture would be worth a thousand words, but it sounds like the "chine that isn't a chine", doesn't spend much time in the water.
     
  2. Rumars
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    Rumars Senior Member

    Here is a link to an example in aluminium, where the bottom-side intersection is really visible all the way and can be defined as a chine. Ice Mint 40' http://www.fr-lucas.com/ice-mint-40--1622 (link because they are not my photos, the boat is shown under construction with all details in plain view).
    If you do the same hullform in cored FRP the transition gets rounded and is not really a "chine" anymore, but the transition is still severe and can be clearly seen.

    Only time it's underwater is when heeled 30° upwind.
     
  3. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    OK. Thanks, that was about what I expected to see.
     

  4. Oscarpp
    Joined: Jul 2020
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    Oscarpp Junior Member

    To build on Rumars explanations, you can indeed clearly see those chines at the intersection of the vertical topsides with a flat but rounded bottom.
    Even heard people mentioning a "shoe box", when you look at the a.m. link re. the OwenClark expedition yacht Qilak, it's getting close !
    On some other designs it's more subtle, but still noticeable, even without a full length

    Apparently another reason for using such chines lies in the hull buidling. Not necessary for polyester hulls made from a mold (see the second picture with the blue hull :
    ICE 52 - ICE Yachts https://www.iceyachts.it/ice-line/ice-52/?lang=en) it's been rounded, but you can guess where it would be with the significant curvature change.
    While not as obvious as with hard chines, it makes the building of metallic (plywood/sandwhich too ?) hulls easier, especially when thick plates are used,
    see this other aluminum expedition sailboat : Blue water aluminium cruiser and exploration sailboat https://www.enduro54.com/en/ , incl. some comments in the faq
     
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