rough weather ferries

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by peter radclyffe, Feb 3, 2013.

  1. peter radclyffe
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    peter radclyffe Senior Member

    In bad weather the ferries cant run to this island, force 8 or 9, do you know of any ferries that are built to handle bad weather, thank you
     
  2. Ad Hoc
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    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    Peter

    It all depends upon the size of boat the speed of boat and the wave periods and lengths encountered. However, having said that, there is only one type of ferry that performs extremely well in rough seas, and that is a SWATH. But not everyone is prepared to accept the small compromises of a swath hull form (namely higher drag and draft) compared to conventional boats.
     
  3. jehardiman
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    jehardiman Senior Member

    What island? Even SWATH's have issues with certian seaways. There is no "one size fits all" hull form for heavy seas and widely variable loading like a ferry. You need a route study and spectra analysis.
     
    Last edited: Feb 5, 2013
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  4. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Many times the ferry is seaworthy and capable of running in the weather, but the port closes. Locally the port is small and ferries cant maneuver in the harbour at force 8.

    Port is closed today. plus or minus 35 knots, williwaws dancing on the surface.

    Dont know elba. In Olbia I see ferries operating in heavy Mistral conditions. The ferry terminal is located so that the mistral is on the stern of the ship , so it must be easier to dock and much less load on her dock lines.

    Have a google at youtube and observe ferry mooring lines snapping while maneuvering in port. Deadly. Plenty of Greek ferries on youtube.

    The youtube of a cruise ship pulling the bollard off the dock with its bow line ,in Palma de Mallorca ,is a classic
     
  5. CDK
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    CDK retired engineer

    In really bad weather like today's gale force NE winds, all small ferries and fast catamarans are cancelled. The only one operating for this island is a large ex-Japanese turbine powered ferry that makes a detour towards a nearby uninhabited island where it alters its course by 90 degrees, then approaches the ferry harbor with tail wind.

    The ride is already very uncomfortable, but the greatest challenge is loading and unloading cars in these circumstances. After each heavy wave there is a window of a few seconds, barely enough for one or two cars. They do not take trucks or buses, we have also been refused with our large van several times because of the long wheelbase.
     
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  6. Submarine Tom

    Submarine Tom Previous Member

    The only reason they cancel ferry trips here is because of the landings.
     
  7. murdomack
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    murdomack New Member

    I was on this ferry many times, but not in this kind of sea. She was built in Norway and was purchased, on the stocks, by Calmac to do their new Ullapool to Stornoway run. She was slow but sure of getting there.
    She was replaced in the mid nineties and was sold to go on freight runs in New Zealand where she continued to show her mettle. From the frying pan to the fire, as they say.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e7NB-bN-ns4

    http://www.google.co.uk/search?q=su...AX7mID4AQ&sqi=2&ved=0CFQQsAQ&biw=1280&bih=623

    http://www.shipsofcalmac.co.uk/h_suilven.asp
     
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  8. peter radclyffe
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    peter radclyffe Senior Member

    thanks
     
  9. murdomack
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    murdomack New Member

  10. JSL
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    JSL Senior Member

    Not sure what these ferries are like but if they have un-modified bow doors it may be a 'class' issue - no sailing at a certain windforce. No one wants a repeat of the 'Estonia'.
     
  11. CDK
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    CDK retired engineer

    Experiences like with the Estonia did change a few things. All ferries here now have mechanical locking of the ramp on both sides to avoid the risk of hydraulic failure or a practical joker pressing the down button during passage.
    Also there are new procedures and unannounced inspections. Several years ago it was not uncommon for a ferry to leave the stern ramp down so they could accommodate a few cars more. They don't do that anymore, even if the sea is like a pond.
     

  12. murdomack
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    murdomack New Member

    The small vessel landing at Iona is one of the "Loch" class. They do not have bow doors or a bow visor, just the two part folding ramp at each end. They do not do open sea crossings but are still exposed to rough weather.
    Open sea ferries like Suilven have a bow-visor and water tight bow and stern ramps.
    I notice that some of the new larger ferries have open car decks from the stern, I'm not sure that this is a good idea. It allows them to carry certain hazardous goods at the stern that could be rolled off the deck in a fire or other dangerous situation.
     
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