Rivets.... re-installing rubrail

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by dlpanadero, Apr 4, 2016.

  1. dlpanadero
    Joined: Mar 2016
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    Location: Tampa Bay FL

    dlpanadero Junior Member

    Hello, I've got a question about rivets and how to re-install my rubrail. I removed the rubrail to re-seal the cap/hull joint (I think water was sneaking in through the joint). I had to drill out the rivets holding the rubrail on. When I go to re-install it, am I able to re-use the same rivet holes? Or should I fill the holes with epoxy and then re-rivet? (Or would screws be better?) I've never really worked with rivets at all, so I apologize if this is a silly question.

    Thanks so much in advance
     
  2. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    gonzo Senior Member

    You can re-drill the holes to the next size up. Otherwise they will fit too loose.
     
  3. dlpanadero
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    dlpanadero Junior Member

    that makes sense, thank you for the response. what about using SS nuts and bolts and using the holes that are already there? Or are rivets better to use than nuts and bolts for this application
     
  4. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Nuts and bolts are much better. Is there enough space for the thickness of the head?
     
  5. messabout
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    messabout Senior Member

    You can use bolts and nuts unless the tip of the bolt can get in the way of your fingers or fishing line or whatever else might snag on them.
     
  6. dlpanadero
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    dlpanadero Junior Member

    I will probably try and use SS nuts and bolts then and just use the holes that are already there from the old rivets. unless like you said gonzo the head of the bolt will be raised too much inside the rubrail... just have to check it out and see. thank you all for the responses, much appreciated
     
  7. TANSL
    Joined: Sep 2011
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    TANSL Senior Member

    Use nuts with lock washers. Although this system on PRF I don't know if it is very effective
     
  8. philSweet
    Joined: May 2008
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    philSweet Senior Member

    A reasonable option is to used sealed SS pop rivets. Bolts will probably interfere with putting the rubber back in the extrusion. You need to have a pretty good touch to get this important sight line to run true after it has been removed. I'd use strapping tape between each hole to hold the extrusion when drilling the hull. Load a rivet in each hole as you go, and be aware of the tendency of the extrusion to wander about. If the rivets you drilled out were SS, and you pushed them clean through with the bit, reusing the old holes is going to be a problem because you probably drilled a new hole beside the old one. If this is the case, I'd redrill the extrusion before mounting it, and I'd bog the old holes with a good repair filler, not cheap caulk. If SS, you will want a damn good two-handed rivet gun, not the cheap ones for aluminum rivets. You can also rent pneumatic or electric rivet guns, and they let you concentrate on getting things aligned properly. This isn't a one hour job, the extrusion isn't going to just naturally land exactly where it came from. There will be a bit of a fight to put it back.
     
  9. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Instead of nuts and lock washers, I'd recommend a "nylock" nut (nylon insert nut) instead.

    In most boats, you can get at about 80% of the inboard flange, but about 20% is just not available. The usual solution is a "nutsert" which is a pop rivet item, but once installed leaves a nut, locked in place, so a bolt can be inserted afterward. It solves a number of problems, particularly in the inaccessible from behind areas.

    I wouldn't redrill the extrusion, nor fill the holes, unless the laminate is busted up. If the laminate is broken up, I would repair these, but I wouldn't redrill a couple hundred holes, unless there was a real need. Also, make sure you clean the corrosion off the back of the extrusion, before bedding it down in polyurethane or polysulfide. Lastly make sure you get the right "grip range" for the thickness you're working with, so a rivet or nutsert can grab properly.
     

  10. FAST FRED
    Joined: Oct 2002
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    Location: Conn in summers , Ortona FL in winter , with big d

    FAST FRED Senior Member

    An old naval aircraft trick is to make a tool that is drilled to the slightly fatter diameter of the old rivet hole and tap each rivet to increase its diameter a tiny bit.

    This will fill the rivet hole and give the same strength with no increase in weight.
     
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