Riveted Steel Hulls

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by ElGringo, Nov 4, 2016.

  1. ElGringo
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    ElGringo Senior Member

    Before welding technology progressed enough to make steel hulls, they were riveted. How did they keep the joints from leaking?
     
  2. Barry
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    Barry Senior Member

    When you have two plates that are to be riveted, they would have drilled the holes at the same time, then reamed them so the holes were as close as possible. The reason is that if there is any slop in the holes, if there is a series of rivets, then it is possible that a single rivet will take more than its share of the load and fail, starting a domino effect.

    The rivet would be placed in a hearth/oven, heated red hot, the pushed into the hole. A person would hold the backing hammer, actually a steel sledge that had a convex dome the same as the rivet head and the other person would manually or pneumatically hammer the flat side of the rivet to 1) completely fill the shank area in the plates (for the reason explained above and 2) to mate both heads to both plates. When the rivet cooled, the contraction would pull the plates together to make a tight fit.

    From an engineering standpoint for shear between two plates, the compression effect of the contraction made the joint actually stronger than what a single uncontracted rivet could provide as the pressure between the plates actually increased the friction between the plate.
     
  3. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    -
    From: Indira Gandhi National Open University

    PDF's ---> Unit 1 -- Unit 2 -- Unit 3 -- Unit 4 -- Unit 5 -- Unit 6 -- Unit 7

    Search the above PDF ‘‘Unit 3’’ for the word ‘‘caulk’’ and read the spacious area for your answer.

    The word ‘‘caulk’’ is mentioned 12 times in the PDF ‘‘Unit 3’’.

    Note also the meaning of the word ‘‘caulk’’ in the riveting context at the Key Words section.

    Search the above PDF ‘‘Unit 3’’ also for the word ‘‘hot’’, and also read the spacious area there for your answer.

    The word ‘‘hot’’ is mentioned 3 times in the PDF ‘‘Unit 3’’.

    Below a small quote from the PDF ‘‘Unit 3’’, containing the word ‘‘caulk’’ 2 times as ‘‘caulking’’, and containing the word ‘‘hot’’ 3 times.
    -
     
  4. mydauphin
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    mydauphin Senior Member

    But this is also the reason ships like the Titanic sunk. The super cool water made the steel in the rivets fragile.
     
  5. ElGringo
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    ElGringo Senior Member

    Thanks Guys, that cleared it up for me. I searched for an hour and couldn't find any information.
    Angelique, The picture in the Unit 3 part made it perfectly clear. Thanks again.
     
  6. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

  7. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Rivetting reading.
     
  8. cesmith9999
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    cesmith9999 New Member

    *groan*

    Chris
     
  9. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    Now I'm confused, is it riveting or rivetting, or is the first pure British English and the second more common English around the world . . :confused:

    P.S. - Oops, sorry for asking, just shoot through my mind, it also could be a typo, as the second wouldn't be a efficient use of the world wide available t's . . :eek:
     
  10. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    Titanic: *groan* = ‘‘ make a low creaking or moaning sound when pressure or weight is applied. ’’

    Chris: *groan* = ‘‘ make a deep inarticulate sound in response to pain or despair. ’’

    Which one, or both ?
     
  11. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Hmmm....I'd say as a general rule, a word ending with "T", with a vowel before the "T", but another consonant before that vowel, not two vowels together, when "ed" or "er" or "ing" is suffixed, the "T" is doubled, as in flit-flitter-flitted-flitting, as against float-floated-floater-floating, but there may be exceptions.
     
  12. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    -
    I've just checked, The New York Times and the Indira Gandhi National Open University seems to apply the exception . . ;)

    TNYT
    IGNOU
     
  13. philSweet
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    philSweet Senior Member

    You don't double the consonant unless the stress lands on the last syllable of a multi-syllable word - Edited, posited, riveted, inhabited.
     
  14. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    It was a riveting conversation, then. :D
     

  15. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    -
    Well if so, let's go back then to the OP and add a bit to our riveting conversation . . :cool:

    Since in the old times people did not only listen to their stereos [0:37-1:21] but also seems to put their stuff on YouTube we can watch a bit of that...


    I was a llittle shocked by the boiler caulking part in the video since it doesn't seem to be compliant with an old comprehensive engineering book on this matter...

    The Steam Engine, 2: A Treatise on Engines and Boilers [spare link] by Daniel Kinnear Clark.

    See ---> page 705 [spare link] ---> page 706 [spare link]
    Next some links and quotes about the difference between Caulking and Fullering...

    MeChAn!zEr
    An in between note:

    In contrast with the firts picture in above link + quote, and the "3 of 8" link + quote below, next a special device for caulking rivet heads, instead of a caulking tool, for caulking the rivets itselves...

    Cooperative Patent Classification: CPC Definition - Subclass B21J ---> B21J 15/48
    See picture: "3 of 8"
    RIVETS AND RIVETED JOINTS
    John Oxley ---> Caulking Plate Edges
     
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