Ripping Douglas Fir 2"x6"

Discussion in 'Materials' started by mariobrothers88, Oct 29, 2020.

  1. fallguy
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    fallguy Senior Member

    Here is a summary of places totalboat suggests use of milled fber at 5% only. However, I use it only for strengthening or when I want zero shrinkage from the material as in a deep hole to fill.

    seriously; it will not help your crossbeams; avoid it in the build; I don't care how much you bought; there may be a time later in the build where you want a lot of strength; perhaps a centerboard case fillet? The times to use milled fiber are few.

    please remember milled fiber is largely a waste product of industry; it is not a primary ingredient in a boat build!

    TotalBoat Milled Glass Fibers | Short E-Glass Fiberglass Filaments http://www.totalboat.com/product/milled-glass-fiber/
     
  2. mariobrothers88
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    mariobrothers88 Senior Member

    Hey guys, so my fumed silica gets in tomorrow and I am planning to precoat the bulkheads when I attach the timbers with a layer of epoxy. However, is it worthwhile to go ahead and precoat the entire bulkhead as well (instead of just the part that will be glued)? Eventually I will need to coat the bulkheads with epoxy, so should I just go ahead and do it now while it's easy to do?
    Thanks guys!!!
     
  3. rangebowdrie
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    rangebowdrie Junior Member

    Yes, anything you can do to parts when they can be in a horizontal position is time well spent.
    Even finish priming/painting whilst leaving a border for glassing-in pays off big time, and gives
    superior results.
    Having to sand/prep/prime/paint, anything in a vertical or overhead position is to be avoided
    if possible.
     
  4. fallguy
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    fallguy Senior Member

    Good time to do it.

    2 oz per yard plus a bit for the roller

    use 4" rollers or 3"

    I buy the 9" adhesive rollers from HD and bandsaw cut them to 3" because they are not reusable...

    a squeegee can eek out a little from the rollers at the end
     
  5. mariobrothers88
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    mariobrothers88 Senior Member

    Hey guys should I get the paint rollers for the epoxy from a quality place like west marine or would the dollar store paint rollers be good enough for epoxy? For those of you in the US, here do you guys typically buy your disposables like paint rollers, brushes, cups, etc? I typically the dollar store and harbor freight, but I was thinking with the rollers it might be better to go with a higher quality product? Thanks for all the amazing advice and feedback guys I really appreciate it!!!
     
  6. fallguy
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    fallguy Senior Member

    Adhesive rollers from home depot are good for small jobs.

    For sheathing the hulls; you will want a roller that can hold a little more epoxy. Like 1/4" naps.
     
  7. mariobrothers88
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    mariobrothers88 Senior Member

    Thanks for all the tips guys! Should I also add fiberglass to both sides of the bulkheads while it's easy in my workshop or wait to add it after building the hull?
     
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  8. rangebowdrie
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    rangebowdrie Junior Member

    Sure, about the only thing more miserable than applying glass to a vertical surface is applying glass to an overhead surface, especially when visually appealing results are wanted.
     
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  9. fallguy
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    fallguy Senior Member

    2nd rangebowdrie

    youmight want to use peelply onthem for bonding tapes
     
  10. mariobrothers88
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    mariobrothers88 Senior Member

    Hi guys thanks for all the great replies! I emailed Richard woods about coating the bulkheads with epoxy and this is what he said:

    "The interior bulkheads can be considered like a kitchen or bathroom in a house. So regular paint is OK. I tend to avoid epoxying anything inside unless it is hidden as part of a watertight compartment for example. I prefer using paint, which might be epoxy, not to be confused with epoxy glue. But again I don't do any coating until the end. But some builders do precoat everything. Choice is yours"

    I'm a little surprised that the bulkheads don't require a coat of epoxy is this similar to other designers? I actually would rather prefer to coat the bulkheads with epoxy given their structural importance would there be any downsides of using epoxy vs paint? Thanks everyone you guys are all amazing!!!
     
  11. rangebowdrie
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    rangebowdrie Junior Member

    Well, you had mentioned glassing the bulkheads.
    Should you not want to glass them, then their is a good trick which will contribute to their longevity and give a good surface for any subsequent finish.
    In any event, you'll want to make sure the edges are well coated with epoxy.
    With the bulkhead(s) horizontal you can pour on a small amount of epoxy, then, by using a rubber/plastic squeegee you spread the epoxy around, using pressure, in a manner as though you're trying to wipe it off of the surface.
    The idea is not to have a thick coating, but rather to just seal the surface, you're just basically closing up the open cell structure on the surface of the wood.
    Such a surface, when dry, will not much "feel" as though it has a coating on it, but leaves a good substrate for further glassing and/or painting.
    Much the same result may be accomplished by pre-coating the surfaces with CPES, as produced by the "Smith Co." up in the Bay Area,, in fact their products are invaluable for use in wooden boat construction.
     
  12. fallguy
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    fallguy Senior Member

    They can be sealed at a rate of 2 oz per yard; then sand with 60 grit. Then they can be painted later.

    The edges are of no worry as they are fillet bonded; no?

    Epoxy is so very expensive. I have used about 300 gallons and thrown away about ? 75 gallons in vac processing.
     
  13. mariobrothers88
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    mariobrothers88 Senior Member

    Fallguy, you used 300 gallons on the skoota32 or on multiple boats?? On the materials list on the website and in the plans, Richard states we need about 290 kg of epoxy, which comes out to 77 gallons for the flica. Are these numbers inaccurate??
     
  14. fallguy
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    fallguy Senior Member

    Totally different boats and different build processes Ron.

    Richard's Flica numbers are probably accurate within 10%. If he says no bulkhead epoxy; there you are over. If you throw away a pound or two; it adds up quick.

    A foam core wet bag build uses a LOT of epoxy because there is a LOT of waste and foam uses much more glass and resin.

    If I make a part that uses one gallon of epoxy; the resin going to trash about 40 ounces or more.

    Also, you are using plywood which uses much lighter exterior sheathing. The bottom sheathing on Skoota 32 is 1800grams or call it 50 ounces. Inside of bottom is same. I used a lighter cloth at 44 ounces, but my sheathing on the hull bottom is 88 ounces per yard and a 30% waste factor is high..
     

  15. mariobrothers88
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    mariobrothers88 Senior Member

    Ahhh ok makes sense thanks so much for the great explanation!!
     
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