Rigging Islander 24 Design

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by ErminoMazzarino, Oct 12, 2005.

  1. ErminoMazzarino
    Joined: Oct 2005
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    ErminoMazzarino Junior Member

    I recently purchased an Islander 24. The boat is discontinued. The boat came to me without rigging or material as to how to rigg the boat. Rather than guess at the rigging.? Does anyone have original rigging materials.? or does anyone know how the boat is Rigged. Any help would be appreciated.

    Appreciativly,

    Ermino Mazzarino
     
  2. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    There are many retailers for rigging materials. If you have the sails, it would indicate the length of the mast.
     
  3. ErminoMazzarino
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    ErminoMazzarino Junior Member

    Rigging is okay

    Gonzo,

    Thanks for your reply. I placed another questionnaire in a different boating forum and received some good information.

    Moving on; I'm not working on the rigging lines. Do you think that it's a good idea to add a boom Vang to the 24 fter. or do you think that as few lines as possible is the best solution.? Also, should the new lines go to the cockpit or remain on deck.? do you have an idea of how the original lines ran.?

    Next I tackle bottom painting and finally interior. The boat a strictly a day sailer. Presently there are 4-sleeping berths on the boat. I'm thinking of removing all sleeping berths except one, someone needing to rest during cruising. There is 1-bulkhead that seems to be supporting weight. the others are partitions and can be removed. I would like to install a flush toilet and running water. A refrigerator and toilet are the only appliance needed. Have any recommendations.?

    Again thanks for your reply, I look forward to hearing what you have to suggest....Ciao..Ermino
     
  4. ErminoMazzarino
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    ErminoMazzarino Junior Member

    oops.

    That is I'm now working on.......
     
  5. yokebutt
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    yokebutt Boatbuilder

    Ermino,

    A four or six to one vang would be a good investment.

    yoke.
     
  6. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    A boom vang is a very effective tool for controlling the main when the wind is free, as pointed out, a worth while investment.

    I'd strongly reconsider "removing" things inside your boat. Most everything there is structural in nature, not simply "partitions". Your boat should have a full bulkhead well forward, in the eyes of the boat (bow), farther back it will have a full width partial height bulkhead at the aft end of the "V" berth, plus a few more partial bulkheads supporting the cabin furniture, another full bulkhead at the aft end of the cabin forming it's division from the cockpit and the transom. These are your major athwartship structural members, don't alter them.

    The choice of lines led aft or kept at the mast is a personal decision, based on your experience. Personally, I leave the halyards and lifts at the mast, because that's where I'll reef and douse from, so it doesn't help me to have them aft. Others like everything at hand in the cockpit, which means line clutches, many turning blocks, cabin top fairleads, cleats and coils of line everywhere, which clutter up the mast base, cabin top and cockpit. Some like this, I don't.

    It would seem by your questions you are reasonably new to sailing, at least this size craft. Before you make big changes to the rig, cockpit and cabin layout, you should gain some experience. Avoid the stuff like Cunningham's and backstay tensioners, until you have the experience to use them properly, without breaking things.

    A flushing head is a costly option, but surly possible in this vessel. A portable unit may be a better selection for this class of sailboat.

    True refrigeration is very costly, both to install and to operate. A 44 quart cooler with 12 VDC hot/cold plate system is a good alternative with a much smaller electrical and wallet load to bear. If you insist on refrigeration, there are a few ways to, all having good and bad points.

    A holding plate setup is good for long term refrigeration away from shore power (120 VAC) they're expensive and need a very good, well insulated icebox. These are the most efficient systems available.

    A stand up unit, just like your house, but designed for marine life. These are duel voltage (12 VDC & 120 VAC) and switch back and forth automatically as you unplug from shore power and rely on batteries. There reasonably efficient but also expensive and need a very good, well insulated icebox.

    A icebox conversion unit (the usual retro fit for a sailboat) is a separate "guts" unit and need an ice box to convert into a fridge. These arrangements let you size the icebox to your needs. These too are expensive and need a very good, well insulated icebox.

    A thermoelectric cooler is a regular cooler with a cigarette lighter plug. These cool 40 to 45 degrees below the outside temperature.

    A electric cooler will run about a buck and a half. The cheapest icebox conversions I've seen, new, run around 400 bucks. The smallest stand up fridges cost about 600 and holding plate systems 650 and up. Both the stand alone and holding plate units prices rise quickly over 1000 if you want any kind of size or features, many of these costing several thousand dollars.

    Most small sailboats don't have the resources to drive a refrigeration unit, without a genset or engine mounted compressor.

    Try the cooler, maybe two, one with lots of ice in it. Get some experience, puttering around the barrier islands and you'll soon have a much better idea of your requirements, which you don't at this point (no offence) I take a cooler full of beer and fish when ever I go out (a few times each week) After several hours, I still have cold beer and ice to toss down my other half's blouse and not have to worry about how many amps I've got left in the battery for the fridge, in case I need my navigation lights.

    A flushing head is going down a similar road, there are a few choices. Stop down at the local West Marine or Boat US (same thing) and treat yourself to some sticker shock on refers and shitters.
     
  7. ErminoMazzarino
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    ErminoMazzarino Junior Member

    Hello Par,

    Very good suggestions. Thank you for taking the time to reply. I didn't think that I was so transparent with my sailing experience. I started sailing when I was 15 years old. I purchased a Flying Dutchman Jr. that needed a ton of repairs. A close friend at the time "George Olson" & "Hap Lee" of Olson & Lee Marine, Ultra Lites, at Santa Cruz, Calif. helped me fiberglass and patch the boat to a sailing condition.

    Once I graduated from High school, spent time in the Navy, Graduated form College and entered the 8-5 world. I had no time for sailing. Now that I'm semi-retired, I can play just a little and this boat is my first attempt a way of life that I once felt very close to-wards. When I entered the Navy, the Flying Dutchman went to my father, who was a very good sailer and seaman. I don't know what became of the boat, but it was fun to sail.

    I will review the interior far more seriously and with the bulkhead placements in mind. It seems that the bulkheads perform 1 of 2 functions; 1) supports mast head and 2) supports cabin shape. Would the hull be effected by the superstructure/cabin supports.? I agree with you, Before I make structural changes I will have answers to the structural questions.

    Again, thank you for your informative suggestions...Ciao..Ermino
     
  8. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Yes the bulkheads perform multiple functions as you understand them.

    The one under a mast keeps the hull sides from deforming, transfers the compression loads from the mast step to the hull, likely also contributes to chain plate load transfer to the hull plus a few other things, so don't start cutting. This is an engineered structure, having little in it that doesn't have to work for a living. Even the furniture inside the cabin serves to support loads.

    Take her out, have some fun, put new cushions in her, varnish up the tiller and enjoy your boat. If you sail her reasonably often, within a year, you'll be a much better sailor and have much more refined ideas of what you want and need in a little pocket yacht. Keep her clean and upgrade things as you find the need (experienced based) or desire (the only way the other half will go with you)

    Sails (the propulsion unit) are a good upgrade, but wait until you know the difference between a good sail set and a bad one. More handy running rigging is another; ideas will come to you as you use the boat or see others use theirs. Convenience items like coolers, cup holders, bath room tissue holder within arms reach of the porta-potty, masthead fly, lighting, new paint, dodger, sail covers, pirate flag, swim ladder, etc. can add to your sailing enjoyment and still keep you in the poor house without redesigning the inside of the boat. Make friends with other sailboat owners and go sailing together, you'll learn a tremendous amount from their experiences, making you a better sailor.

    Welcome to the passion, stay close to shore and name it after your wife (trust me, it works)
     
  9. ErminoMazzarino
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    ErminoMazzarino Junior Member

    Hey Par, How is it going.?

    With regards to the structural of the 23, I guessed after reading your first note that most of the interior partitions are supporting members. Not sure what they are supporting at this time, but I'm sure that will be made clear later. A copy of the hull design would be of big help. Have any ideas where I can find one.?

    Also, do you know where the hull numbers are stamped.? There is an Islander registration and boat club on the net. One of the questions on the registration form asked for the hull numbers.

    I had thought of naming the boat "No Way", may wife's first reaction. But naming the boat after her, that is pure genius.!

    Again, thanks for the reply, Please stay in touch... Ciao..Ermino
     

  10. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Ciao, the design and the drawings of your yacht are coveted by the architect and likely protected by copyright. If you asked GM for the blueprints to their Corvette, do you think they'd let you have them?

    The hull number or HIN (Hull Identification Number) will be on the upper right hand side (when viewed from astern) of the transom, if the boat is newer then the early 70's. If built before this time, then it could be anywhere, but is usually on a major structural member, like the keel, centerboard case, mast partners, stem, etc.

    The biggest key in yacht ownership for a couple, is keeping the other half involved. She'll have input (let her have her way some times, the boat will look a lot better for it, trust me) and this needs reflecting in a project, or things go sour fast. I've seen divorce over boats before, so don't cast this issue aside, besides fooling around on a sailboat is very sensual.

    Register the yacht with the support group. There you'll probably find much yacht specific advice in regard to your boat. Good Luck . . .
     
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