Richard Woods Flica 34' plywood/epoxy Build

Discussion in 'Boatbuilding' started by mariobrothers88, Dec 14, 2020.

  1. fallguy
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    fallguy Senior Member

    so do not worry about the space; you buttblock over with glue and nail (or screws)

    Follow the instructions to a T.

    If you get confused about the instructions, let me know.
     
  2. mariobrothers88
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    mariobrothers88 Senior Member

    Thanks Dan you have been so helpful and I really appreciate it! Can I use Polyurethane wood glue to glue the butt straps or should I stick with epoxy?
     
  3. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    The plexiglass batten has flat spots where the clamp is holding it to the block. Nails allow the batten to have a fair curve. Otherwise, if you used blocks with weights (usually called whales or ducks) they have a point to push on the batten to prevent flat spots.
     
  4. fallguy
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    fallguy Senior Member

    Gonzo-the plexiglass batten was a forum reply not related to the build or OP; you are correct; the curve is flat @ clamp points and less than ideal, but only confusing things unless you mean to tell Ron it is less than ideal

    Ron-use any glue that has full strength overnite so you can forge ahead.
     
  5. fallguy
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    fallguy Senior Member

    I also like using cans full of metal junk or rocks. The can is a round surface and only touches the batten on the tangent.
     
  6. cracked_ribs
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    cracked_ribs Junior Member

    A) you're just confusing things here
    B) the line still has to get cut and unless you're making a plywood statue of a coiled snake, the amount of flat you're going to get out of that is negligible and gets easily absorbed in the cut
     
  7. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    A) I don't understand what is confusing about my statement
    B) The cut should be to the line, which is not fair. If you don't follow the line, there will be more problems. Lofting is done so the surfaces and intersections are fair. What you are saying is that your lofting is not fair but somehow the sawcut will correct the errors. Why do it wrong to start with?
     
  8. fallguy
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    fallguy Senior Member

    the problem the OP is having is not the his lofting is not fair; he can make a fair lofting if he follows my instruction and yours, but he hasn't begun to loft

    the part he is making is a temporary jig and he is asking if the one inch or so gap in the jig matters; it won't because when he lays the plywood over the jig, the plywood will make the fair curve; it won't be able to go flat in an inch of gap...if you make a fair curve for plywood to be laid on, and you cut a one inch vee into it; the plywood does not flatten over the one inch cutaway and if it does it is so infintessimally small, it does not matter

    Then to top that off, if you butt block the seams of the jig; the butt blocking would be able to be cut fair!

    In your defense Gonzo, Ron's post is really pretty confusing.
     
  9. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Errors accumulate.
     
  10. cracked_ribs
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    cracked_ribs Junior Member

    If anyone forced through tragic circumstances to hold a batten with blocks and clamps is actually genuinely concerned about the amount of flat generated on a curve that would be realistically used in laying out a boat...just flip the block to the convex side of the curve. The "flat" is now reduced to the point of absurdity.

    This is a total non-issue. But do what you like.
     
  11. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    It depends on the effect aesthetics have on you.
     
  12. fallguy
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    fallguy Senior Member

    Wrong. In this case, the errors vanish. You cannot make a piece of plywood flatten on a jig mould with such a small void that won't even be present after butt blocking!

    The argument here is nonsense. You are confused about what he is doing Gonzo. I like and support about 99% of your posts, but you are confusing a novice builder. He will have more error in the sawcut of the jig than by the gap closed by the blocking. He hadn't even drawn the fair line, yet.
     
  13. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    I don't think I am confused about what he is doing. He can't draw a fair line with that setup. Learning how to do things correctly is really important. If he laminates over a jig that is not fair, the finished part will be different than expected. The lamination may end up being a fair line, but it won't be the correct shape. Errors do accumulate. The closer to the lines plans he makes the parts, the better the final result will be. Starting with a good jig is not nonsense, but the opposite.
     
  14. mariobrothers88
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    mariobrothers88 Senior Member

    Hey guys I ended up laying a concrete level pad because I had difficulty finding good quality wood to make the strongback. The plans say: "If building on a flat concrete floor, 3"x3" wood blocks can be bonded to floor using a runny polyester-filler mix, or car body filler." I bought Bondo fiberglass resin from walmart. When it says "polyester-filler mix", am I suppose to mix the fiberglass resin with a filler like fumed silica, or should I just use the Bondo fiberglass resin (with hardener of course)? Also, since I know polyester resin doesn't bond well to wood, should I precoat the 3"x3" wood blocks with the Bondo resin first before glueing it to the concrete?

    Thanks for all your help guys, I truly appreciate it!!!
     

  15. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    The mix for that is usually with chopped or milled fibers
     
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