Reverse bows on cruising cats pros and cons

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by DennisRB, Mar 1, 2013.

  1. DennisRB
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    DennisRB Senior Member

    I agree, this is appalling. That anchor position is ridiculous.
     
  2. DennisRB
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    DennisRB Senior Member

    I fully agree that it would be a waste of space when paying marina bills. The plumb bow wins here for sure. The reason I was referring to an extension was this sort of thing can be easily done when building, just like many people extend sterns. Over all after making this thread, I think the stern extension is a better way of getting a bit more waterline length. The cons of a reverse bow just seem to outweigh the pros.
     
  3. cavalier mk2
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    cavalier mk2 Senior Member

    H'mmm maybe we could make a reverse bow incorporating anti dive planes as the swim steps...We'll market it as a safety. Pick up the skiers and overboards by pointing at them. It might even keep them away from the prop if the boat stops....
     
  4. waikikin
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    waikikin Senior Member

  5. Milehog
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    Milehog Clever Quip

    All Aboaard!
     
  6. cavalier mk2
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    cavalier mk2 Senior Member

    Talk about heavy displacement, whatever moooo ves you along.
     
  7. Submarine Tom

    Submarine Tom Previous Member

    A cow catcher bow, now were talking!
     
  8. Petros
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    Petros Senior Member

    you mean like these modern designs?

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  9. Submarine Tom

    Submarine Tom Previous Member

    Now, that's MY kind of boarding ladder!
     
  10. Corley
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    Corley epoxy coated

  11. Doug Lord
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    Doug Lord Flight Ready

    Good info, Corley!
     
  12. DennisRB
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    DennisRB Senior Member

    Who is good at photo shop? We need an image of a photoshopped cow flying up from the bows of that Catana.

    Petros. That design is worthy of consideration for many cruising boats. The perfect bow shape for dealing with other boaters running their gen/compressors/gangnam style or loud country music in idyllic anchorages. :p

    Corley, thanks for the links. Very informative. My notes on the links are:

    This bow shape goes hand in hand for boats with lifting foil assist. By keeping the buoyancy low, the foils can stay at a better angle of attack, by reducing bow down trim. So if you have angled foils for lift, this is worth considering.

    As mentioned in this thread, the bow shape is an inconsequential effect due to the volume distribution moving closer to the WL.

    Also mentioned in this thread, the shape allows for less speed loss and tripping motion if the bows go under.

    The boat will have better pitch dampening. Does this mean better motion comfort at the expense of getting wet? This point also confuses me a little. If buoyancy is closer to the WL, wouldn't it mean the bows would lift sooner than if the buoyancy was higher up when encountering a wave? Maybe the pointed "piercing" shape is more important than buoyancy distribution here??
     
  13. Petros
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    Petros Senior Member

    That sounds like too much trouble when at anchor, I would use this that you keep on deck at the ready:

    [​IMG]
     
  14. El_Guero

    El_Guero Previous Member

    Looks like fun.

    But, it also looks like it would sail like the Mayflower ....

    :cool:
     

  15. Petros
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    Petros Senior Member

    worse actually, it could only sail down wind, even in a reach it would skid sideways and be almost uncontrollable. One time when they were caught in a bay in rough weather with rocks on the lee shore, and they were too exhausted to row out of it, they jury rigged a small sail off that tail hook using a sun canopy so they could turn it around and get away from the shore. It was very heavy and difficult to row, most of the distance they rowed, and could only sail it when conditions were just right.

    They built the ship to retrace the presumed Jason journey of over 3,000 miles, had to row it most of the way. Rowing an open, bronze age hull for 3000 miles does not sound like much of a vacation. It was a very interesting read however, excellent description of what ancient travel on the water was like. The story of Jason and the Argonauts is the most ancient human story of seafaring adventures.
     
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