Rethinking the smallest boat circumnavigation

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by stonedpirate, Feb 17, 2012.

  1. viking north
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    viking north VINLAND

    Ok one more post on the subject--wondered how long it would take for someone to pick up on the communications aspect and you are correct as far as we know he had none in terms of tranmitting capability other than the sling shot,however no one knows for sure on his receiving capability, only Moitessier himself. Ok lets eliminate the come in second theory--wasn't a strong point anyhow just thought i'd throw it out there and see if it held any water. The fact is he agreed to join the race --In his own words he thought of nothing else, if he won he'd snatch the cheque without a word of thanks and auction off the trophy. He committed himself--gave his word as a gentleman . (Again consider the era my moral values play no role). His commitment in reality was the heart and sole of the event. He was one of the most famous sailers on earth--the boy to beat. Naturally everyone expected him to follow thru and what does he do, he thums his nose at them all, fellow racers included, and sails off into the sunset with 2/3's of the race completed. Again not my moral values but those of the time --he betrayed his own word of committment. He belittled the whole event -- Remember even in the 60's a mans word was still fairley solid especially amoung fellow comrads in arms. Today I agree amoung many, moral responsibility is as you consider it pffffft. I'm judging the man and his actions in his era and not present time. Based on that, it was not a proper thing to do. He had the sailing world, The Race Sponser, His fellow competers, His fans and countrymen, all hiped up and let them down. Wow imagine the loss betting world took. I imagine he perturbed more than a few by that hard turn to starboard. :) How do I judge him --well --one hell of a sailer- and i know this is dissappointing but i have not advanced to modern times where committment is pfffft, my word is still solid and i expect the same in return--been dissapointed many times but every once and awhile i meet that one in a hundred -- so yes i am dissapointed in Moitessier and yes i'm a little harsh on him but hell making that fool move he deserves it. And yes you are correct he failed my standards and those my friend I am not ashamed of. End of story--I agree to disagree --cheers Geo.
     
  2. JosephT
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    JosephT Senior Member

    Well, you got one thing right about Moitessier...commitment. It seems he couldn't keep a commitment longer than a season or two. He was a man of the sea...an ocean nomad so to speak. Perhaps he had some Gypsy in his blood. Who knows. Below are just some of his famous quotes that reinforce his lack of commitment not only to his wife, but to any nation. He sees the oceans as his "nation". Think about it.

    Reason he gave for leaving his wife: "You do not ask a tame seagull why it needs to disappear from time to time toward the open sea. It goes, that's all."

    On citizenship: "I am a citizen of the most beautiful nation on earth. A nation whose laws are harsh yet simple, a nation that never cheats, which is immense and without borders, where life is lived in the present. In this limitless nation, this nation of wind, light, and peace, there is no other ruler besides the sea."

    On deciding to push on to Tahiti: "I wonder. Plymouth so close, barely 10,000 miles to the north...but leaving from Plymouth and returning to Plymouth now seems like leaving from nowhere to go nowhere." (Written after rounding the Horn in the Golden Globe race.)

    There's no question his commitment was to explore the world. Just read his books and you'll see. In more ways than one he's like Joshua Slocum who bounced around from one place to another for years.

    All in all both RKJ & Moitessier have left a lot behind and I would be torn to say who I appreciate more...because I respect them both a lot.

    Signing out,

    Joe
     
  3. jak3b
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    jak3b Junior Member

    I agree. If I were on an ocean liner I would feel good about having RKJ on the bridge while talking with Moitessier in the bar.
     
  4. viking north
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    viking north VINLAND

    Nuff--well and done said--Tnx. Geo.
     
  5. Nick.K
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    Nick.K Senior Member

    Good reply.
     
  6. Nick.K
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    Nick.K Senior Member

    Agreed. I think I have read all his books, some several times. He has been a big influence for me. I really admire his philosophy of simplicity.
     
  7. Nick.K
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    Nick.K Senior Member

    To me, the drama of that race, between sheer endurance, suicide, desertion within sight of completion and sinkings, the characters....that is what makes it so fascinating. Years later and we are still debating what might have been, who was right and who wrong.
    Agreed, he "quit" the race (but what a way to quit!!).
    Without maverics like Moitissier, life would be dull, in a sense we are indebted to them. Just look at the number of serious well meaning threads on any forum that shrivel and die...and then one like this that goes on and on.
     
  8. Yobarnacle
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    Yobarnacle Senior Member holding true course

    Men get strange ideas at sea.
    Once when I was a deckhand, we were in the galley playing poker after supper.
    A fireman stuck his head in the door and asked to borrow a quarter to buy a newspaper.
    Since we were at sea, it got a few nervous laughs. Someone tossed him the requested coin. Nobody ever saw him again. Guess he went for a paper.
     
  9. kvsgkvng
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    kvsgkvng Senior Member

    Off topic, it may have the reference to the solo long ocean crossings, does anyone know more details of a modified reduced sleep pattern? I heard of read about some dudes/duddets, making three hour stand and then sleeping for 20 minutes round the clock for entire 24 hour cycle. I've read that it takes time to get used to it, but once the proces is complete, as someone said: "you better have a project, because you are going to have a lot of free time on your hands."

    I also know of "Centurion time." I think this could be of some value to the long watch on a solo trip.
     
  10. kvsgkvng
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    kvsgkvng Senior Member

    Ayudas de la cocaína con problemas
     
  11. Nick.K
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    Nick.K Senior Member

    No entiendo eso; que querres decir... que parece que estoy drogado?
    Si quierres insultar, haz lo en Ingles que es el idioma del forum.
     
  12. Milehog
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    Milehog Clever Quip

    This explains much.
     
  13. Yobarnacle
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    Yobarnacle Senior Member holding true course

    Nasa determined 3 hour power naps for astronauts where every minute in orbit was worth 100s of thousands of dollars. 3 hours restored 80% capacity and was sustainable over many days. I have used 12 hours on and 3 hour nap schedule. It gets old, but doable.
     
  14. Yobarnacle
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    Yobarnacle Senior Member holding true course

    Que bien
     

  15. pdwiley
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    pdwiley Senior Member

    OK, got it. By your standards, it's a moral failure to quit a race once you've agreed to participate and:

    1. You're still alive and physically unimpaired

    2. Your boat isn't broken beyond repair.

    I'd say that Moitessier has an awful lot of company.....

    And, BTW, your unstated but obvious implication that Moitessier was lying about his comms is pretty poor form. If you read his other books including the one on building, commissioning & sailing JOSHUA, you won't find any references to radio gear, so I don't find it all surprising or unlikely that he had none aboard for the race.

    I actually don't think I would have liked Moitessier personally, some of the things he said and did as documented by himself I find offensive. That doesn't detract at all from his ability as a seaman or his attitude to that race. I find RKJ's attitude far more offensive, frankly, he comes across as a bigot and a nationalist who wasn't in the race for the pleasure of it at all, just for achievement & fame.

    Which brings us round the complete circle to stoned pirate, who doesn't come across as a bigot or nationalist, but certainly as someone only interested in self-aggrandisement.....

    PDW
     
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