restoring old mahogany small boat

Discussion in 'Powerboats' started by yli nick, Jul 31, 2018.

  1. yli nick
    Joined: Jul 2018
    Posts: 25
    Likes: 0, Points: 1
    Location: romania

    yli nick Junior Member

    slow progress...i had to break apart every piece, repaired, glued again. all oak ribs were eeplaced. kept only the mahogany. 20190831_152724.jpg
     
  2. fallguy
    Joined: Dec 2016
    Posts: 1,894
    Likes: 104, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: usa

    fallguy Senior Member

    Sure looking good.

    Are you worried about it losing shape?

    Is the sole level with dwl?

    Sorry I somehow missed alerts for this thread, but yj gave excellent, better advice.

    Keep at it; it will be beautiful.
     
  3. Yellowjacket
    Joined: May 2009
    Posts: 594
    Likes: 82, Points: 28, Legacy Rep: 447
    Location: Landlocked...

    Yellowjacket Senior Member

    Looks great. What are you using to bond the stringers into the frames? Finally, turn it upside down and then make sure the bottom is flat for the last 3 feet or so in both directions. If you don't you'll have to fair it later and that's a lot more work than if you do it now.
     
  4. yli nick
    Joined: Jul 2018
    Posts: 25
    Likes: 0, Points: 1
    Location: romania

    yli nick Junior Member

    i've checked and the bottom is flat and the boat is straight and it kept it's original form because i've replaced part by part. the boat was never put apart.. it took a lot of time but it was made piece by piece..
    i bond the stringes with monocomponent polyurethane glue
     
  5. yli nick
    Joined: Jul 2018
    Posts: 25
    Likes: 0, Points: 1
    Location: romania

    yli nick Junior Member

    any advices will be welcomed IMG-20190831-WA0008.jpeg
     
  6. Marinetraffic24
    Joined: Monday
    Posts: 1
    Likes: 0, Points: 1
    Location: Amsterdam

    Marinetraffic24 New Member


  7. Yellowjacket
    Joined: May 2009
    Posts: 594
    Likes: 82, Points: 28, Legacy Rep: 447
    Location: Landlocked...

    Yellowjacket Senior Member

    aft.jpg A good polyurethane glue like Tightbond will certainly do just fine. That will also work for applying most of the decking. In the rear, where the decking strips are used to reinforce the transom I'd use 6 mm strips. and cover them with 60z cloth that is treated to wet out clear and bond them in with epoxy. Stiffening the transom is important and you want and need strength back there. Your boat has a lot of deck framing. In particular the decking has a lot more stringers than any normal race boat but that is what you need to support the strips. The problem with solid strips is that they aren't strong in bending between the stringers if the grain is in the long direction. If you want to use solid strips like you showed in your earlier post I would use what ever was on there originally. A 3mm plywood on the deck would be plenty. You could thin the mahogany strips and use a layer of 6 oz glass on the inside and 4 oz on the outside and that would be really durable. If you did that you could thin the strips down to 3 mm.

    For the bottom a 5 or 6 mm ply is what was most likely what it was built with in the first place. A good marine plywood like Sapele meranti is fine. Okoume is lighter but not as strong. If you use Okoume you could use a 6 0z clear glass cloth on the bottom with epoxy and that would provide that extra bit of waterproofing and some more strength. Here's a pic of my rig. The decks are Okoume that has been stained with a fade resistant dye (metal based dye) that is made by Lockwood. If you google Lockwood metal complex dyes you will be able to pick one that you want, or you can buy several powders and mix up your own color to match the decking, which is what I did, to match the lighter Okoume to the color of the original Sapele . Also for a deck epoxy I'd use a 4 oz cloth and a 3 mm skin. If you waterproof with epoxy you need enough thickness. If you use cloth with that same thickness you'll be using 4 oz cloth, so the weight of waterproofing is the same as using 4 oz cloth. The big advantage of the cloth is that it really stops checking from sun damage that can happen as the boat ages. 4 oz "deck cloth" will wet out to be invisible if you use a cloth that is treated to wet out clear.
     
Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.