Restoring my 17' Canoe

Discussion in 'Fiberglass and Composite Boat Building' started by grendel54, Aug 4, 2017.

  1. grendel54
    Joined: Aug 2017
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    Location: La Crescenta, CA

    grendel54 Junior Member

    thanks for all the info...everyone has been very helpful. Today I started painting the inside. I went with an Oil based Protective Enamel paint, color-Gloss Sand. It is hard to tell how it will turn out yet, but it will definately need a second coat.
    My question is, after this first coat, do I sand? It seems like Id be sanding fiberglass. And if so, what grit should I use? I can't imagine anything more than 220.
     
  2. fallguy
    Joined: Dec 2016
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    fallguy Senior Member

    You won't like me for saying this, but prep, prep, prep is what makes painted surfaces perform best. If you painted over loose degraded resin, the paint will fail soon when touched, bumped, etc. If I am wrong and the resin is not degraded and loose, then light sand and repaint per the manufacturer. Most paints require at least 24 hours, but some require more cure time. If I am right, after the paint cures for the same amount of time, drag your foot across the bottom where you will be sitting and see if the paint lifts off easily. If it does, just sand it all down with a heavy grit and scrap the first coat for better prep. my thoughts, good luck
     
  3. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    gonzo Senior Member

    If you just need to scuff the paint between coats, use a fine sanding sponge.
     
  4. grendel54
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    Location: La Crescenta, CA

    grendel54 Junior Member

    ok 220 sponge is what i planed on using.
     
  5. rwatson
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    Location: Tasmania,Australia

    rwatson Senior Member

    Depending on how smooth the inside is ( fg bumps etc) wet and dry ~150 would probably be a bit more effective in time and cost and 'toothing'.
     
  6. grendel54
    Joined: Aug 2017
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    Location: La Crescenta, CA

    grendel54 Junior Member

    im afraid with 150 im going to be taking the fiberglass off...Even when I am painting it now the fiberglass still is bumpy coming through the paint...is this normal?
     
  7. grendel54
    Joined: Aug 2017
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    Location: La Crescenta, CA

    grendel54 Junior Member

    025.JPG

    shes coming along

    any ideas on how to clean up the aluminum?
    steal wool doesn't seem to be working.
     
    gonzo likes this.
  8. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    It's worked just like anything else, coarse to fine abrasives. The last abrasives you'll use will be cutting compounds and polishes, the first you'll use depends on how deep the dings and nicks are. Start with 220 wet and see what she looks like in terms of smoothness. Of course, it's a shame you just painted the inside, as it's going to get aluminum oxide all over it with this sanding and buffing stuff. If the rail looks okay, just scratched after the 220, move to high grits up to about 600. At this point it's usually wise to switch to abrasive pads, through 1,500 at least, though if you want a mirror finish (you can get it) you'll go through to 3,000 or even 5,000 grit, before pulling out the buffer.

    Paint on the inside will not protect your butt or feet from the little exposed fibers, which is why most suggested putting some resin on it, to replace what excessive UV exposure depolymerized.
     
  9. rwatson
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    Location: Tasmania,Australia

    rwatson Senior Member


    I did say "Depending on how smooth the inside is ". You are the only one who can judge how much the paint will do.
     
  10. fallguy
    Joined: Dec 2016
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    fallguy Senior Member

    Aluminum can be a real bear to polish out. It is easier if it can be removed, but those are riveted on it appears. Honestly, I'd leave the aluminum alone if it were me.

    I have it down to 5 minutes per foot with a 3/4" extrusion one side (extrusion off the boat). It is a progression. I start with 180 dry and cut in a different direction with each grit change. I think I go to wet at about 500 depending on my mood. That way you will not miss seeing each grit remove the prior. Going to be super hard to work around each rivet and your paint job is going to turn black. Once I get up to 800, I switch to a cordless screwdriver and a pad with some higher grit discs. I'm tired and can't recall the name right now. Micro something or other I think.. Point is, I can't see you running polishing pads near the finishes. So, the only way you can really do it is to drill out the rivets, remove the gunnels and replace them after polishing. Not worth it if you ask me. First time you use the boat, the gunnels gonna get dings.
     
  11. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    I start wet, with everything taped and masked off, usual 220, unless there are deep scratches. I continue wet until I get to the polish. I do think polishing is worth it. This one thing can make or break a sale. I use wet paper up to about 400 - 600 then move to the 3M pads, though 1,500 usually, unless I'm looking for a mirror finish. If so, I continue through 3,000 and maybe 5,000, depending on the aluminum alloy. lastly are two round of rough and fine cutting compound and finally a good polish, before waxing .

    81.jpg
    This keel strip, which has fingerprints all over it and hasn't been fully polished or waxed yet, was taken to 1,500. It started as plane old 5083 bar stock, was cut with a jig saw, had it edges radiused with a router and sander, then 220 wet on up to 1,500.

    This piece of aluminum (same boat, same stock) has been polished and waxed.

    47.JPG

    My point is aluminum is easy to work, though you'll get dirty.
     
  12. SamSam
    Joined: Feb 2005
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    SamSam Senior Member

    If you're talking about the weave of the cloth as 'bumpy', that's normal. If you're talking about the fine, single thread or single filament fuzzy stuff that rubs off and itches, that's good. Once the paint dries, a light sanding removes all that stuff and the next coat is smooth, you can rub your hands and skin all over it with no trouble.
     
  13. grendel54
    Joined: Aug 2017
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    Location: La Crescenta, CA

    grendel54 Junior Member

    Thanks...I will test it out...if I am still getting fiberglass, I will sand and repaint...thanks.

    Today I am finishing up the seats...they were sanded down and I am covering them with some Watco Danish Oil...

    001.JPG
    002.JPG
     
  14. SamSam
    Joined: Feb 2005
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    SamSam Senior Member

    That stuff isn't very good for outdoors, you should probably put a coat of varnish or polyurethane or something over it.
     

  15. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Agreed, oil treatments don't protect from UV very much, don't last very long and has to be constantly reapplied, every few months here in Florida. Varnish is easy to repair, but not as easy to apply as polyurethane, which is much harder to repair.
     
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