restoring existing paint on 17ft 1964 dixie

Discussion in 'Materials' started by captwilly, Jul 3, 2011.

  1. captwilly
    Joined: Jul 2011
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    Location: north carolina

    captwilly New Member

    I am restoring a 1964 dixie 17ft closed bow. The paint on the bow and side rails is original and has a basketball weathered look. What is the recommended
    method of restoring the paint(recommended type) . Can it be done without removing the original? I am disabled vet, and is why I want to do the job myself. Thanks
     
  2. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Once a paint goes past a certain stage, it must be removed. Yours sounds as though it's well past this stage. It can be sanded smooth and painted over again, but I suspect what you are seeing isn't well attached to the hull beneath it, so you should remove it and start again.

    I'm not sure how old the paint is, nor what type, so some caution should be used as it might have lead in it. A well fitting particulate mask should be sufficient. There are three basic methods of removing paint: abate it, chemically strip it or scrape it.

    Scraping with a heat gun is a time honored method, but I don't recommend this as it usually makes more work for you. You'll invariably scorch and gouge areas, which must be repaired. If you sand it, you'll make what seemingly is a new career, removing paint if it's thick (several layers) and go through an alarming amount of paper. You could use media blasting and I'd recommend a soft media, such as walnut shells so you don't do much harm to the surface below. Lastly is chemical stripping, which is my usual recommendation. If you follow the instructions on the can and use the right stuff, it's fast, easy and not as harmful to the surface. Many are biodegradable too, so you just wash it down the drain.

    I'll assume this is a 'glass boat, so make sure the stripper used is comparable with 'glass (some aren't). Once you have the paint off, you'll neutralize the surface, usually with water, then scuff it up with sand paper for the new paint. I'd recommend an epoxy based primer as these have the best "stick-um" and for the top coat, a single part polyurethane. With paint you have many types to select from, but it's hard to screw up this combination. Do yourself a favor and read up on "roll and tip" painting methods. The search tool here as well as other places on line (including You Tube) will show you how to get a paint job that looks sprayed on with this technique.
     
  3. captwilly
    Joined: Jul 2011
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    captwilly New Member

    restoring paint on dixie

    Thank your reply to my question. Your answer was exactly what I thought might be required but you really put it in great context. I will follow up and my only other question will be;" your thoughts on the best sealer, paint, and poly. Is there a paint/sealer? Is water based poly acceptable.

    Thanks again, happy 4th and "Bless our Troops"

    Capt Willy
     
  4. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    There isn't any "best" out there. Some seem to work better then others, but this is a subjective answer and not really a good way to base these types of decisions.

    With paint, you usually get what you pay for, so if you stop down at Wal-Mart and pick up some house paint for $20 a gallon, you can pretty much expect it to be peeling off your boat fairly quickly. On the other hand the LPU paints I use are about $400 a gallon (retail) and are the hardest, most durable and have the highest gloss retention in the industry. You'll do well to select a good quality single part polyurethane, which will range from $80 to $120 a gallon.

    Primers are the same deal. You can use some house hold stuff, but it's not going to stick so well to your boat. I'd recommend System Three epoxy primer. It's water clean up and all paints will stick to it good.

    As far as sealer, you 'glass boat doesn't really need any, unless you've sanded through the gel coat. If so, use straight epoxy and smooth up the surface, then prime. If it's the wooden rail then epoxy again is a good choice, though not completely necessary and prime and paint will do. Rub rails by their very nature are intended to get beat up and eventually replaced, so going to great lengths to protect them is not necessary.

    All this said, you have to decide what you want from the old gal. House paint will work and pretty her up quickly and cheaply. This is fine if you don't need yacht finishes and long term durability. On the other hand better paints will last longer, be more durable and look better too. It really depends on what you want. If you elect to use house paints, use high gloss only. If you want a satin or flat finish, apply high gloss first, then a top coat of the finish type you desire. This will provide the best protection from these types of paints.
     
  5. captwilly
    Joined: Jul 2011
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    Location: north carolina

    captwilly New Member

    reply for type of paint

    Thanks for the heads-up on glass painting. I would never use house paint and didn't even think you could. It's an old o cute design boat and I just want to try to get all I can out of my ability. Even going the best, it will still be cheaper than I thought= Thanks
     

  6. CaptBill
    Joined: Jan 2010
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    Location: Savannah,Ga

    CaptBill CaptBill

    Need to remove paint? Gotta get yourself some Fran-Mar Soy Strip. Been painting 28 years and never, ever seen such an awesome performing stripper. Great to work with. No respirator necessary. No gloves necessary... I stripped a 17' Boston Whaler topsides in less than 8 hours. Tools? A two-pack of stainless dish scouring pads ($1 at the dollar store) and about a quart and a half of the Soy-Strip (maybe $25 bucks?). And I did it wearing sandals...stuff dripping all over my feet all day.

    Definite must for most stripping jobs.
     
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