restore starcraft American

Discussion in 'Boatbuilding' started by Starcraft, Jul 1, 2017.

  1. Starcraft
    Joined: Jul 2017
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    Location: Belgium

    Starcraft Junior Member

    One stringer was rotten about 40cm. The ohter part and the other stringer was not bad, but you see where the wood was wet or have been wet. I think it was better as you said to change them.

    Grtz
     
  2. Starcraft
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    Location: Belgium

    Starcraft Junior Member

    Which type of wood should I use for replacing the stringers? What's do you recommend?
     
  3. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Good question, what is available locally ? PAR might know more about Northern Hemisphere species. But maybe Europe has different offerings.
     
  4. Starcraft
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    Starcraft Junior Member

    The middle stringer is die 3/4 cut out. The back part was rotten, the other was good.
    Now I 'm gonna clean it between the FB where the stringer was positioned.
    What's do you think about where I cut the stringer through? Should it je good, or further?
    IMG_20170719_110601.jpg IMG_20170719_110553.jpg IMG_20170719_110548.jpg
     
  5. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    As the Beatles sang, "let it be"......if it presents as sound. Do you intend to place any foam buoyancy back in there, before replacing the sole ?
     
  6. Starcraft
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    Starcraft Junior Member

    I think to do the next jobs in this organisation:

    - first to clean everything, the other foam at the FB where the stringer sat.
    - clean the parts where the wood was wet
    - sandpaper the FB
    - treat the FB with something that is waterproof
    - installing new stringer (should I'm treat them with someting that is also waterproof?)
    - remake the flotation boxes and transom
    - use foam that is also waterproof for under the sole

    In europe we use this tye of wood: oak, beech, pine wood, mahonie, teak.....
     
  7. Starcraft
    Joined: Jul 2017
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    Location: Belgium

    Starcraft Junior Member

    Today everything cleaned, all the foam remover from the fiber.
    What should I do with the fiber that is not placed good? You see some space under the fiber, or between the layers...
    IMG_20170719_155259.jpg
    IMG_20170719_155321.jpg
    IMG_20170719_155229.jpg
    IMG_20170719_155312.jpg

    Is it good to pull this out and place new layer's of fiber?

    Thnx
     

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  8. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    The good glass doesn't need to be sealed (it already is), just "tooth" it up good with an aggressive grit (40 - 80), in prep for subsequent bonds. Grind down the bad spots, to remove the white spots or delaminated areas.

    Epoxy the new lumber or plywood with 2 coats of neat goo. This will seal it and assumes it will be bonded in place, which will provide the necessary final film thickness for waterproofing.

    This is a good place for plywood, sealed as described. Current building trends make transom the same thickness as outboard powered vessels, so in your case, 3 layers of 3/4" (19mm) plywood for the transom. When you mark and cut the "keyhole" cutout and drive mounting holes, bond these holes, by drilling oversize, filling with thickened epoxy and redrilling for the actual fastener size.

    You can put foam back in if you like though empty floatation chambers work just as well and can permit moisture to drain aft, if weep holes are strategically placed. It's your call, more work and materials or just partitioned up areas that serve the same role.

    One of the softwoods will do, assuming it's fairly straight grained and accepts goo's willingly. Teak is a poor choice, oak (European) is slightly heavy but okay, mahogany is likely costly, but also a good choice.
     
  9. Starcraft
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    Starcraft Junior Member

    Many thanks PAR and Mr efficiency!!!!!:);)
     
  10. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    It is a bit hard to say what is best, without actually being there. With the transom panel, there will likely be difficulty getting one piece in there, past obstructions, which would require a different approach. You might be able to experiment with a sheet of stiff cardboard to see what you can juggle into place. You can use the existing cut-out to clamp the new transom in, while the glass is wet, with the help of a couple of 3x2's, and 4 G-clamps. Or you could ditch the ply altogether, and go for a sandwich panel, with high compressive strength material near the opening, and more "normal" stuff further away, but that will involve a lot of work, and glass, as well. Not easy, and with the deck still attached, more difficult.
     
  11. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    I have to piece meal transom in all the time. The key is to have widely overlapping seams, use lots of decks screws (not drywall, which tend to snap off, just when you prefer they didn't) and a logical center out fastener pattern. The keyhole cutout can be very helpful. A few bolts and nuts can go a long way to bringing a few 2x4's to bear hard against the assembly. Wedges, braces, in fact anything you can rig to apply enough pressure to insure uniform pressure and ooze out around the edges and seams.
     
  12. Starcraft
    Joined: Jul 2017
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    Location: Belgium

    Starcraft Junior Member

    And about the stringers, would it be a solution using seacast instead of wood? Because the wood will also rotten after some years?
     
  13. Starcraft
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    Location: Belgium

    Starcraft Junior Member

    or using LVL?
     
  14. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Ah...."laminated veneer lumber".....I'd use plain timber. I don't think I would be worried too much about what might happen decades into the future. You can get a good result without going on a spending spree, with money you will never recoup if you sell it. I wouldn't bother with epoxy, coat the timber with poly resin, slot it in the gap left by the old stuff. I would draw that tabbing up to the timber with suitable screws at intervals, so there is no gap. Then glass over the tabbing and the timber, after rounding the top so the glass will take the turn.
     

  15. Starcraft
    Joined: Jul 2017
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    Location: Belgium

    Starcraft Junior Member

    what you mean with bad spots, white spots or delaminated areas?
    My plan was to sandpaper the whole inside (below sole) of the boat and then treat it with the subsequent bonds.

    thnx for your time guys!!
     
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