restore starcraft American

Discussion in 'Boatbuilding' started by Starcraft, Jul 1, 2017.

  1. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    I'm not sure I understand your question about the deck, but it looks like some really aggressive paper will get you down to the 'glass on the transom.
     
  2. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    I think he means the foremost part as shown in the first photo in post #29 appears sound. If it is, and I'm not sure how he is sure about that, it seems unnecessary to rip that out.
     
  3. Starcraft
    Joined: Jul 2017
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    Location: Belgium

    Starcraft Junior Member

    I think I'm almost on the fiber, when i'm rubbing it with the chisel, it feels hard and not soft of the wood.

    About the deck, my question is, I haven't removed the deck in the front part of the boat (bow). Where the cap is closed (front of the boat) it is still there. My question is, should I remove it too because the wood of that part of the deck is good (not rotten). Or is it necessary to remove it because of the stringers? Just like Mr efficiency means, that's what I'm meaning.

    Thnx
     
  4. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    I'm a big fan of having good access, but I'm also one that doesn't like to make more work for myself, if I don't have to. So, this would be your call. If you have the room to work, leave it, but if you're banging your head a lot, cut it off and put it back on later.
     
  5. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    What starcraft is calling "deck", is what PAR calls "sole", or a mug like me calls floor, because that is what most of the public call it. To them, a sole is a funny looking , though tasty, fish !
     
  6. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    . . . or what's attached to the bottom of your shoe . . .
     
  7. Starcraft
    Joined: Jul 2017
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    Location: Belgium

    Starcraft Junior Member

    Hahaha indeed, a sole in bitter and french fries!
    Did today the other part of the transom. It is ready to polish it. The front part of the deck/floor/Sole I didn't do because it is attached to some wire (like poultry netting). This part wasn't rotten so I didn't break it down.
    Other question, the Middle stringer has ben wet, bit the wood is not rotten, what would you do? See the 3rd and 4th picture...
    IMG_20170714_145629.jpg
    IMG_20170714_143715.jpg
    IMG_20170714_145301.jpg
    IMG_20170714_145309.jpg
     
  8. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    True !
     
  9. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Not sure what the wire mesh was used for. The stringer that is wet, but not obviously rotten, would be a risk to leave in there.....glassing over a damp piece of timber would be inadvisable. Whatever dry rot spores were in the structure, are probably lingering there, so unless there is some risk of the straightness of the bottom going awry after it comes out, I think it would be better to get it out, but only cut away as much tabbing as is necessary to prise it out.
     
  10. Starcraft
    Joined: Jul 2017
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    Location: Belgium

    Starcraft Junior Member

    So you wouldn't take out the whole stringer, is this what you mean? I was thinking also to cut out the wet part till the wood is normal and dry again? Is this good and reliable as replacement en sturdy enough because your stringer isn't one piece anymore? How you 'glue' the different parts on eachother?

    Thanks
    Belgian starcraft
     
  11. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    A new length of timber sounds like a better idea, what is the concern about removing it ? Remove just enough of the glass tabbing to be able to lever it out, the odds are it won't look too flash when inspected.
     
  12. Starcraft
    Joined: Jul 2017
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    Location: Belgium

    Starcraft Junior Member

    I have 2 worries:
    1) after replacing the stringers, what if the strength of the boat is not good? If it is wrong replaced you get cracks in the hull and then I have even more problems?
    2) the middle stringer goes to the front of the boat, where I didn't want to change the front deck/sole because of the wire mesh. If I change the middle stringer, that also something that I'm not used to do and what about the strength there when I'm changing it?

    On the other hand, then I'm sure about the wood that it will not rotten because of replacement... So your advice, is to change it, but just taking te glass tabbing off (at the upper side or also at the side of the stringer were the FB makes contact with the hull?)

    thanks
     
  13. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Do you think the hull bottom has a solid feel, or is very springy ? I notice they have used woven roving in there, which is a good sign. If you remove that stringer, leave the tabbing intact and just cut the top that is holding it from being lifted out. If you are sure the forward part is solid, leave it. You can butt your new section to it, but to ensure a good continuity of strength, you will need extra glass where the join area is, you won't get much strength from a glued butt joint.
     
  14. Starcraft
    Joined: Jul 2017
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    Location: Belgium

    Starcraft Junior Member

    Hello,

    Did some work today. I pulled 2 stringers out and it went really easy. Thnx me efficiency for the advice!!! I tool the top of the encapsulated FB out and they stringers come suprisingly good out. Just I have allready some questions:
    1) I noticed where the stringers sat down, there was some foam between the stringer and they FB. Should I remove that? Picture 3,4
    2) some FB isn't placed very good, you see relief in the fb . Should I remove those Parts or what should you do? (Picture 2,5,7)
    3) the FB that the stringers encapsuled are not placed good in the corners. You see there is space between the FB and they Hull. Should I remove it and place new one, one's that nice in the corners and connects as it should?
    Here are some pictures
    IMG_20170717_152800.jpg
    IMG_20170717_152730.jpg
    IMG_20170717_152916.jpg
    IMG_20170717_152853.jpg
    IMG_20170717_152811.jpg
    IMG_20170717_152750.jpg IMG_20170717_152741.jpg

    I wonder if it wouldn't ben better to replace the FB too? Ik think there is only 1 layer of FB that starts left OR right and than in 1 layer is placed over the 3 stringers. Is that ok?
    Thank you very much
     

  15. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    What was the state of those stringers ? Rotted ? I'd leave the glass tabbing that was holding those stringers, there, but thoroughly clean out the channel, particularly of any residue of rot. When you slot in the new pieces of the same width, you can bed them in a lightweight filler made from resin and q-cell, so there aren't any voids.
     
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