Restoration of a fishing shooner is possible?

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by S17665, Nov 13, 2006.

  1. S17665
    Joined: Nov 2006
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    Location: Europe

    S17665 Designer

    Hi, it's my first thread .
    Everybody has a dream and we, seamen,have a boat of the dreams.
    When i saw for the first time this boat was only a children but was immediately love. ;)
    Is possible a restoration for this fishing shooner?

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]



    Thanks a lot
     
  2. Scott Carter
    Joined: Oct 2006
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    Location: Annapolis

    Scott Carter Senior Member

    Hi, ahem, Satan -
    Your boat has seen some hard use, and at least recently probably some neglect. In the pictures you've shown the largest financial burden will be what is almost certainly a complete replanking of the hull. Certainly the entire stern area needs planking removed, inspection of timbers beneath and then preservation efforts done on the exposed timbers. If the planks are as far gone as these then water has certainly been on or around the transom, stringers and keel.
    She's beautiful, and would look better with a rig. If there are no masts or other spars then these can become a significant financial investment as well. I hate to keep harping on the $$ issue, as I have no idea what you're comfortable with spending. The bottom line is that almost any boat can be restored to seaworthy condition, depending on how much time (=$$) you care to spend on it.
    Bottom line, in my opinion, count on total replanking at least.
     
  3. Vega
    Joined: Apr 2005
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    Location: Portugal

    Vega Senior Member

    Possible but very expensive.

    And when is ready count with a lot of maintenance.

    Recovering a boat like that is a very nice thing to do, but it only makes sense if it is made by several friends (with knowledge of woodwork), otherwise it will be too expensive and would take a long, long time.

    Or even better, if it is made by a subsidized association that puts the boat at the service and pleasure of a somewhat large community.

    If you are really interested you will see that making such a "cultural association” is not so difficult . And in the end you will sail the boat and don’t have to pay the bills.:D

    Good luck;)
     
  4. DGreenwood
    Joined: Aug 2004
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    Location: New York

    DGreenwood Senior Member

    It would not be cassified as a restoration. It would technically be a replica when finished. From the photos, I would guess you would have difficulty in finding a piece of wood to save. In this case, life would definitely be better for you if you built a new boat.
    However, if you insist, definitely heed the advise of Vega. Unless you are a very wealthy and patient man, it will end in tears.
     
  5. longliner45
    Joined: Dec 2005
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    Location: Ohio

    longliner45 Senior Member

    a good copy could be made ,,unless she was striped of her brass ,and ornaments,,,,,,,,,sometimes you just gotta let go,,,,,,but then again I would be contradictive to myself if I said never,,,how old are you ,,how much time do you have ,,and my guess would be 50,000 us dollars for material ,,if you can find it,,,,there is a trawler I am familire with on the east coast of US. called the Josephine she was built in 1850s or so but under constant maintanance ,,she has been rebuilt 2 or 5 times ,,one plank at a time,,,good luck,,,,,longliner
     
  6. Frosty

    Frosty Previous Member

    Satan, she is a lovely boat, and I have to say i was some what dissapointed by the replies you had untill I enlarged the pictures and had a proper look.

    Any way Scott I am not familiar with your boat yard, can you give me a lat and long. I cant immagine any where deep enough in Phang Nga.
     
  7. timgoz
    Joined: Jul 2006
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    Location: SW PA USA

    timgoz Senior Member

    As said above, it looks as if it would be more of a pattern, that a replica could be built from, tha a restoration.

    Reminds me of Joshua Slocum & his "Spray". He basically built a new boat out of the old.

    As most know, he did one hell (no pun intended Satan) of a fine job out of it.

    Personal wealth, or a source of financial backing, or both, would be a prerequisite. Much skill (either yours or others), labor, and time, would be required. Possibly time measured in decades.

    I sure hope that if you launch this endevour, you keep us posted with updates & photos. It would be nice to watch her progress.

    Take care.

    TGoz
     
  8. Ari
    Joined: Jan 2006
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    Location: Port Dickson, Malaysia

    Ari Patience s/o Genius

    of historical or sentimental value ?

    Unless that boat have a very high historical value or sentimental value to the restorer and financial fund is not the limitation point go ahead and restore it otherwise the boat should be allowed to rest.Longliner suggestion of building a replica of the boat is very sound advise if the historical or sentimental value is very high indeed some pieces from the old boat should be carried over to the replica boat. If not, built a proper shed, restore to acceptable level and preserve it as it is as a monument.
     
  9. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Yes, a restoration would be possible, but likely cost prohibitive, compared to a replica. A restoration involves replacement and repair of worn out or damaged pieces, to original condition, using similar methods and materials. A replica does the same thing, but short cuts can be made to lower costs, procure materials, speed up repairs, etc. An example would be a plywood deck instead of a laid deck to prevent leaks, make the deck stronger and lighter, through the use of modern materials.

    I'm not completely sure of her size, but with a general estimate, from the photos, she's going to require at least 7 figures to bring back to sailing health, mid 6 figures to seal her up and frankly, again, going with the pictures, she's pretty much spent.

    From the photos, I can see her planking is done, the hull is hogged, several broken frames and the garboards have dropped. This means the boat has lost her shape, partly from what she is and the life she had, plus what this old girl has endured on the hard. It would take me about a year, just to get her hull twisted back into shape. This wouldn't include any new parts, just jacking, bracing and cussing her back into shape, probably with some temporary shores to hold her there, until new structural members could be installed.

    As has been mentioned, she'll need a corporation be set up, to fund such an adventure. A grand one indeed, but requiring many thousands of skilled labor hours and many thousands of board feet in lumber. She'll carry several hundred pounds in paint alone, just to give an idea what she really is.
     
  10. longliner45
    Joined: Dec 2005
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    Location: Ohio

    longliner45 Senior Member

    dont be discouraged,,If you love the sea , you will find your boat,,build her or buy her and remember ,,,,life is for the living,,,live it ,,,longliner
     
  11. S17665
    Joined: Nov 2006
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    S17665 Designer

    Thanks a lot for replies ,I'll say here what be my choice :confused:


    Light water friends :)
     
  12. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Set up a conservation fund for the old girl, with the first course of business to get her covered, or better yet indoors. Research her history and find out what she's about, her life and get the local papers involved (they'll call it a "fluff" or "filler" article), but folks will see it and give money. Set up a "save my boat" web site, contact Wooden Boat Restoration, Wooden Boat Save A Classic (part of the magazine). In general, round up some interest in the old lady and see what happens.
     

  13. DFV
    Joined: Dec 2006
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    Location: Surrey, BC, CANADA

    DFV Junior Member

    Fishing Vessels

    Greetings,
    My buddy is currently restoring a 1947 Danish Fishing Vessel. He has taken all of the concrete ballast out of the hull and is now proceeding to the replacing of 2" thick white oak planks on the hull. We have a website going but the boat has only progressed so far: http://www.vikingboatlift.com/daneboat/

    Depending upon the resources you have, (money, time, power tools), I would suggest you go ahead if it is a dream of yours. As a casual 'something-to-do', I'd say forget it. If you decide to go ahead, we would love to share experiences with you.

    -rg-
     
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