Required nav lights for a small sailboat?

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by DennisRB, Mar 28, 2011.

  1. TeddyDiver
    Joined: Dec 2007
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    Location: Finland/Norway

    TeddyDiver Gollywobbler

    A sound advice Tom..

    Rule 20
    Application


    (b) The Rules concerning lights shall be complied with from sunset to sunrise, and during such times no other lights shall be exhibited, except such lights as cannot be mistaken for the lights specified in these Rules or do not impair their visibility or distinctive character, or interfere with the keeping of a proper look-out.

    Rule 21
    Definitions

    (a) "Masthead light" means a white light placed over the fore and aft centreline of the vessel showing an unbroken light over an arc of the horizon of 225 degrees and so fixed as to show the light from right ahead to 225 degrees abaft the beam on either side of the vessel.

    (b) "Sidelights" means a green light on the starboard side and a red light on the port side each showing an unbroken light over an arc of the horizon of 112.5 degrees and so fixed as to show the light from right ahead to 22.5 degrees abaft the beam on its respective side. In a vessel of less than 20 metres in length the sidelights may be combined in one lantern carried on the fore and aft centreline of the vessel.

    (c) "Sternlight" means a white light placed as nearly as practicable at the stern showing an unbroken light over an arc of the horizon of 135 degree and so fixed as to show the light 67.5 degrees from right aft on each side of the vessel.

    (d) "Towing light" means a yellow light having the same characteristics as the "sternlight" defined in paragraph (c) of this Rule.

    (e) "All-round light" means a light showing an unbroken light over an arc of the horizon of 360 degrees.

    (f) "Flashing light" means a light flashing at regular intervals at a frequences of 120 flashes or more per minute.

    Rule 22
    Visibility of lights

    The lights prescribed in these Rules shall have an intensity as specifies in section 8 of Annex I to these Regulations so as to be visible at the following minimum ranges:

    (a) In vessels of 50 metres or more in length:

    - a masthead light, 6 miles;
    - a sidelight, 3 miles;
    - a sternlight, 3 miles;
    - a towing light, 3 miles;
    - a white, red, green or yellow all-round light, 3 miles.

    (b) In vessels of 12 metres or more in length but less than 50 metres in length:

    - a masthead light, 5 miles; except that where the length of the vessel is less than 20 metres, 3 miles;
    - a sidelight, 2 miles;
    - a sternlight, 2 miles;
    - a towing light, 2 miles;
    - a white, red, green or yellow all-round light, 2 miles.

    (c) In vessels of less than 12 metres in length:

    - a masthead light, 2 miles;
    - a sidelight, 1 mile;
    - a sternlight, 2 miles;
    - a towing light, 2 miles;
    - a white, red, green or yellow all-round light, 2 miles

    Rule 23
    Power-driven vessels underway

    (a) A power-driven vessel underway shall exhibit:

    (i) a masthead light forward;
    (ii) a second masthead light abaft of and higher than the forward one; except that a vessel of less than 50 metres in length shall not be obliged to exhibit such light but may do so;

    (iii) sidelights;
    (iv) a sternlight.

    (b) An air-cushion vessel when operating in the non-displacement mode shall, in addition to the lights prescribed in paragraph (a) of this Rule, exhibit an all-round flashing yellow light.

    (c) (i) A power-driven vessel of less than 12 metres in length may in lieu of the lights prescribed in paragraph (a) of this Rule exhibit an all-round white light and sidelights;

    (ii) a power-driven vessel of less than 7 metres in length whose maximum speed does not exceed 7 knots may in lieu of the lights prescribed in paragraph (a) of this Rule exhibit an all-round white light and shall, if practicable, also exhibit sidelights;

    (iii) the masthead light or all-round white light on a power-driven vessel of less than 12 metres in length may be displaced from the fore and aft centreline of the vessel if centreline fitting is not practicable, provided that the sidelights are combined in one lantern which shall be carried on the fore and aft centreline of the vessel or located as nearly as practicable in the same fore and aft line as the masthead light or the all-round white light.

    Rule 25
    Sailing vessels underway and vessels under oars.

    (a) A sailing vessel underway shall exhibit:

    (i) sidelights;
    (ii) a sternlight.

    (b) In a sailing vessel of less than 20 metres in length the lights prescribed in paragraph (a) of this Rule may be combined in one lantern carried at or near the top of the mast where it can best be seen.

    (c) A sailing vessel underway may, in addition to the lights prescribed in paragraph (a) of this Rule, exhibit at or near the top of the mast, where they can best be seen, two all-round lights in a vertical line, the upper being red and the lower green, but these lights shall not be exhibited in conjunction with the combined lantern permitted by paragraph (b) of this Rule.

    (d) (i) A sailing vessel of less than 7 metres in length shall, if practicable, exhibit the lights prescribed in paragraph (a) or (b) of this Rule, but if she does not, she shall have ready at hand an electric torch or lighted lantern showing a white light which shall be exhibited in sufficient time to prevent collision.

    (ii) A vessel under oars may exhibit the lights prescribed in this Rule for sailing vessels, but if she does not, she shall have ready at hand an electric torch or lighted lantern showing a white light which shall be exhibited in sufficient time to prevent collision.

    (e) A vessel proceeding under sail when also being propelled by machinery shall exhibit forward where it can best be seen a conical shape, apex downwards.

    Rule 36
    Signals to attract attention

    If necessary to attract the attention of another vessel any vessel may make light or sound signals that cannot be mistaken for any signal authorized elsewhere in these Rules, or may direct the beam of her searchlight in the direction of the danger, in such a way as not to embarrass any vessel. Any light to attract the attention of another vessel shall be such that it cannot be mistaken for any aid to navigation. For the purpose of this Rule the use of high intensity intermittent or revolving lights, such as strobe lights, shall be avoided.
    :)
     
  2. troy2000
    Joined: Nov 2009
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    Location: California

    troy2000 Senior Member

    I used to sail a small dinghy with a lateen sail in Florida. I'd take it up the Intracoastal from Ft. Lauderdale to the Hillsboro Inlet, sail out a ways, then turn and parallel the shore with two fishing poles set 'wing and wing,' looking for dolphin. Never caught any big ones, but I caught a few that were good eating...

    I had decent running lights, but I didn't trust only to them when I was coming back late and threading through the drunks. I also carried a humongous flashlight I could duct-tape to my mast, and illuminated my sail with it.

    Even that probably wasn't enough to stay really safe. While I was there, some idiot ran smack dab into a water taxi one night -- and it was lit up like a Christmas tree, with billboards and strings of light.
     
  3. murdomack
    Joined: Jun 2007
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    Location: Glasgow

    murdomack New Member

    All these degrees are great with the electronic instruments and all the other goodies we have now, but it was so much simpler when a sailor just needed to know that the lights changed colour "2 Points abaft the beam".
     
  4. michael pierzga
    Joined: Dec 2008
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    Location: spain

    michael pierzga Senior Member

    ...Teddy Driver seems to be confused and as a result he is confusing others. A strobe light is not a navigation light on small craft...ITS A SIGNALING DEVICE.

    This high altitude signaling device is so effective that it is widely used and has saved many lives. Just ask Alex Thomson , Mike Golding , the hundreds of oceanic sailors who use them or the USCG " A High intensity strobe helps in visually locating search targets ".

    A permanently mounted masthead strobe is required equipment for many offshore events.

    Transpac regulations

    http://www.sfbaysss.org/transpac/transpac96/tprules.html
     
  5. TeddyDiver
    Joined: Dec 2007
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    Location: Finland/Norway

    TeddyDiver Gollywobbler

    One part right this time..

    "the use of high intensity intermittent or revolving lights, such as strobe lights, shall be avoided." :)

    and
    USCG " A High intensity strobe helps in visually locating search targets " Think about that what it means Miquelito..
     

  6. Pericles
    Joined: Sep 2006
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    Location: Heights of High Wycombe, not far from River Thames

    Pericles Senior Member

    Michael and Teddy,

    What are the both of you guys going on about? You are like politicians arguing whether the cup is half full or half empty. You are both in Europe, but like the USA and the UK, you are two nations divided by a common language. :D :D

    Enough already.

    P

    Small Russian sail boat, no lights, but who'd argue with this crew?
     

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