Replacing lights from 1976

Discussion in 'Electrical Systems' started by Pudulax1, Dec 7, 2012.

  1. Pudulax1
    Joined: Dec 2012
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    Location: Washington, D.C.

    Pudulax1 Junior Member

    Hello -

    I recently bought a 1976 Egg Harbor Motor Yacht, and the lighting fixtures work, but some of the fixtures really need to be replaced. I am planning on installing LED fixtures, but the wiring is confusing me.

    The fixtures have a "high" and "low" setting which seem to be wired separately. The new LED fixtures would only need a hot wire, a neutral, and a ground. I have five wires, which I assume are two hot, two neutral, and one ground. Does anyone know how this should be converted so that I can install a new modern fixture? Can I just cap off the extra hot and neutral wires? Hopefully these pictures will help.

    Thanks from a newbie!
     

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  2. CDK
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    Location: Adriatic sea

    CDK retired engineer

    What your pictures show is a mixed AC-DC fixture, something nobody does anymore because it is dangerous to have high and low voltages within one device. It could be that it has been converted, but from the looks of it there are two 12V fittings (one empty) and a tubular 110V lamp.

    LED lighting can of course be connected between + and - DC if you have 12V fixtures, or between AC and neutral if you use domestic ones. In case you want to keep both circuits, install separate units.
     
  3. Pudulax1
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    Pudulax1 Junior Member

    Ah! That makes way more sense now. I would probably like to just use the 12V on these because of the lower draw and the ability to use while out at sea without a generator on. Do you see any benefit to using solely the 110v?

    What would you recommend for removing (or capping) the ones I do not use?
     
  4. michael pierzga
    Joined: Dec 2008
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    First investigate whether it is indeed AC power to the lights.

    DC leds are the way to go for any new system.

    All those extra wires, if they are still usable , could be handy if you decide to use a cluster of LEDs for high low, instead of a dimmer switch or Red night lights.
     
  5. CDK
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    CDK retired engineer

    My advice is to cap and label the AC wiring, then push it behind the upholstery. I cannot discern the colors with 100% certainty, but it looks like white, black and green have been used for AC and protective ground.
     

  6. sdowney717
    Joined: Nov 2010
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    sdowney717 Senior Member

    I would label the wires and leave them capped in the new fixture.
    Disconnect them from their AC power source wherever that must be. Somewhere on the AC panel?

    Unused unknown AC hot wires running around is bad idea.

    That way someone will know that they exist in case a future owner or you want to do something useful with them.
     
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