Replacing a few stringer panels

Discussion in 'Fiberglass and Composite Boat Building' started by 9986mkoh, May 15, 2014.

  1. 9986mkoh
    Joined: May 2014
    Posts: 2
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: NE OH

    9986mkoh New Member

    Hi all,

    I just got a 1985 Silverton 34C a few weeks ago and there are a few lateral members between the stringers that should be replaced sometime. He (the surveyor) said overall, the structure of the boat isn't impaired. However, I like my stuff to be in very good shape. The stringers have been replaced and are still in very good shape confirmed with a moisture meter and sounding.

    I also have to replace the core of the deck under the flybridge ladder sometime. The deck flexes under the ladder if you bounce on it, and this was also checked by sounding with a hammer and a moisture meter. I plan on replacing this from the underside above the fuel tank. I think this is reasonable and definitely can't be any worse than the way it has been. Any input on whether I should go with balsa or foam?

    Now, back to the lateral members between the stringers ( I forgot what they're called, if anyone knows the name it's be appreciated as well). I'm planning on cutting them out and leaving enough of the existing stringer shell to just set the wood in place on a thin piece of foam (to prevent a hard spot) then glass them over with fiberglass cloth and epoxy (WestSystem). I was going to go with a 10 oz E glass cloth (http://www.uscomposites.com/cloth.html).
    Any input on this is also greatly appreciated, as I'm fairly new to fiberglass work. All I've really done is add a layer to the inside of my 13' sailboat hull.

    And for reference, here's a picture of what I'm working with. The panel directly in front of the engine is pretty much gone, as well as a couple other lateral members. It makes sense because that is right where the AC condenser drains and the weep holes or whatever they're called aren't glassed. Needless to say, I'm running the AC condenser to a sump.
     

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  2. 9986mkoh
    Joined: May 2014
    Posts: 2
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: NE OH

    9986mkoh New Member

    Any help or suggestions from anyone?
     
  3. Skua
    Joined: Apr 2013
    Posts: 142
    Likes: 5, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 73
    Location: Hunt's Pier WW NJ

    Skua Senior Member

    I have no suggestions as your plans sound good to me. I'm in the middle of a complete refit on my boat
     
  4. boatbuilder41
    Joined: Feb 2013
    Posts: 159
    Likes: 3, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 56
    Location: panama city florida

    boatbuilder41 Senior Member

    transverse stringers. thats what the coast guard refers them as. when i build a C.G. approvex passenger for hire vessel that exceeds a certain speed. the coast guard requires transverse stringers every 30 inches
     
  5. gdavis
    Joined: Dec 2014
    Posts: 72
    Likes: 1, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 17
    Location: belfast,maine

    gdavis Junior Member

    Just say no to balsa core, I don't know why they even still make it! Foam core is the way and if your going to attach the ladder to the new work the best bet would be what is called coussa board(spelling?). Good stuff, will out last the rest of the boat and perhaps the human race as well. The new stringers should be scribed in and set into thickened epoxy instead of foam,standard method. When glassing onto old gel coat make sure it's ground or sanded clean, no oil or grease from the engine. All inside corners should be filleted before glassing as it is hard to get glass to go into hard corners. Perhaps two layers of cloth would be better or at least extra tabs in the corners. Good trick of leaving a bit of the old glass in for reference, I'm doing the same on a 1979 37'C Hunter sailboat,what a deal I got on this. Just a little fixing here and there and everywhere and a few bucks. What a fool I can be, but when done she will take away to places I have not been!.....................................g
     

  6. Ken B
    Joined: Dec 2014
    Posts: 1
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    Location: West Islip, NY

    Ken B New Member

    I am looking to purchase a Mark Ellis Pilot 24. When I had the boat surveyed, the surveyor brought to my attention what looks like at the head of the two Chine stringers that there are cracks. Although the they don't appear structural, almost like plastic covers that were never glassed in, could that be.
    Any information about this would be most appreciative. A beautiful boat and I would hate this to be a deal breaker. Thank you
     
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