Repairing a laser

Discussion in 'Fiberglass and Composite Boat Building' started by the_sphincter, Jan 22, 2006.

  1. the_sphincter
    Joined: Nov 2005
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    Location: behind the grundle

    the_sphincter *

    I put a hole in my laser (not too big, and nothing I can't repair), I have a question about resin. I'm going to repair it, then put factory gelcoat on it. I think all the stuff from vanguard is polyester resin, could I use west system (epoxy) on top of the polyester resin, and then polyester gelcoat on top? If not, what's a good poly resin, or are they basically all the same? Any tricks for working with poly vs. epox?
     
  2. zerogara
    Joined: Aug 2004
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    Location: Preveza

    zerogara build it and sail it

    Where is the hole at? In the bottom, topsides, deck?
    Is it just a hole or is it a crack with a hole?
    The problem with fixing anything on a Laser is that you can not open it and work from the inside. Resin will not fix anything other than if it is filled water will not go in. You need glass in a much larger area than the hole. If it is not done right when the part of the hull will flex while sailing it will pop off.
     
  3. Sander Rave
    Joined: May 2005
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    Location: Amsterdam; The Netherlands

    Sander Rave Senior Member

    I did the same repair not so long ago, if you need some specific information, pictures etc. send me a mail.
    I's not that hard (depending on the hole and the location)
     
  4. the_sphincter
    Joined: Nov 2005
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    the_sphincter *

    Don't really need specific information, just wondering if I can use epoxy, and then factory gelcoat (poly) on top? I'm going the inspection port route to get at it. It's not wet, it was sitting upside down at the club, and a mast fell onto it, sort of causing a crack-hole thing, but cover was on and it stayed dry.
     
  5. deseely
    Joined: Jun 2004
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    Location: North Carolina

    deseely New Member

    There is an epoxy from System Three that is compatable with poly gelcoat. I don't remember the name but if you search there web site I'm sure you can find it.
     
  6. John ilett
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Perth Australia

    John ilett Senior Member

    Just repair polyester boats with polyester resins and that's it.

    Break away the worst of the damage and grind a reasonable bevel in the laminate around the edge of the hole.

    Give a little hand sanding on the inside of the hull around the hole too.

    Make a light fglass skin by moulding it off something flat. Then cut it a bit bigger than the hole and flex it through the hole and bond to the inside of the hull with some polyester filler pulling it to the inner hull with some string through the fglass skin. Once cured you then have some support to build up the remainder of the laminate to approximate thickness.

    Sand/grind near flush and fair with polyester body filler.

    Spay gel repair, wet sand and polish.

    No extra hatch needed.
     
  7. fiberglass jack
    Joined: Dec 2005
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    Location: toronto

    fiberglass jack Senior Member

    gelcoat will not stick to epoxy gelcoats poly poly does not bond to epoxy but epoxy will bond to poly unless u coat the epoxy with a reanistion resin like derakane then the gell will bond just use polyester resin in the repair john's post is the way to repair it
     

  8. deseely
    Joined: Jun 2004
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    Location: North Carolina

    deseely New Member



    There are epoxies that polyester gelcoats will bond to. This is taken directly from the System Three web site.

    "Recommended Uses:
    It was especially formulated for use in building and repairing sail and surfboards over polystyrene cores. It can also be used for coating and laminating. SB-112 is unique in that polyester resins and gel coats may be bonded to it without the use of "tie-coats". We recommend that polyester be bonded onto freshly sanded SB-112 epoxy within 48 hours of cure."
     
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