Removing prop shaft under cockpit floor

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by BoatIl, Mar 30, 2016.

  1. BoatIl
    Joined: Mar 2016
    Posts: 4
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Eel Pie Island (London) UK

    BoatIl New Member

    Hi!
    I am fixing up a Ballerina MkII wooden sailing boat, designed by Robert Tucker, which came with an inboard and a pitch-changing propeller. When I first got her last year the gear was in bad shape so I got an outboard which worked very well. I have now decided to remove the inboard, which was easy enough, and I want to remove the stern tube and all the shaft mechanism. The boat has a self draining cockpit but I can't see any way to lift the floor to access the hull at the proper point. Does anyone have any experience with this design and could you suggest how to lift the cockpit floor? Should I just cut the tube and bracket with an angle grinder and patch up the hull?
     

    Attached Files:

  2. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 19,133
    Likes: 472, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 3967
    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Welcome to the forum.

    This is a common setup for sailboats and though I'm not familiar with your particular boat, removing the tube, shaft and gear isn't much different than other boats.

    As a rule you'll probably find everything so frozen up, that fastener removal will be the real test and leaving the tube in place the best option. The shaft should pull out once the coupling is removed and the packing gland nut is backed off or removed. Of course it's not going to like it, but some "convincing" is usually necessary.

    [​IMG]

    This coupling should already be unbolted from your transmission.

    [​IMG]

    With the coupler shaft bolts removed, you can push the shaft aft, once the gland nut is removed.

    http://coxengineering.sharepoint.com/pages/sternglands.aspx

    To remove the fasteners, try a 6 point socket first, but don't be surprised if the head break off. Once they do, drill the fastener shank and use a bolt extractor on each. It's important to get the fasteners out, so they don't cause issues with the surrounding wood.

    Once the gear is removed, plug and seal the fastener holes and instead of pulling the tube, just plug and seal it. You may want to go back to a inboard at some point or possibly the next owner might. As to acess, welcome to the small boat world. If you got the engine out, then you had enough access to remove the coupler to trans flange bolts, so you have enough (often very tight) room to get at the stuffing box and related stuff.

    Can you post a picture of the inside, where the engine used to live?
     
  3. BoatIl
    Joined: Mar 2016
    Posts: 4
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Eel Pie Island (London) UK

    BoatIl New Member

    Thanks for your help, and for the information.
    The motor came out forwards behind the removed companion way. I will take some photos in the next few days and post them. My problem is that the tube disappears into a bulkhead and then reappears out of the bottom of the hull. What fasteners are you referring to? If I leave the tube and remove only the shaft I guess everything connected to the hull (supporting wedge and bracket) stays, no?
     
  4. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 19,133
    Likes: 472, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 3967
    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    No, everything attached to the hull comes off, the strut, rear bearing, etc. The tube can remain and it'll be all but impossible to remove anyway. Trim flush if necessary, plug and fill, so the hull doesn't leak. The tube just protects the shaft and deadwood assembly or keel. The rest of the gear comes off or else it's just drag and corrosion waiting to hamper sailing qualities and surrounding wood health.
     
  5. BoatIl
    Joined: Mar 2016
    Posts: 4
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Eel Pie Island (London) UK

    BoatIl New Member

    I found a photo of the engine as it was a couple of years ago.
     

    Attached Files:

  6. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 19,133
    Likes: 472, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 3967
    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Though this image doesn't help much, it does show that if it's been removed, you should have access to the stuffing box.
     

  7. BoatIl
    Joined: Mar 2016
    Posts: 4
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Eel Pie Island (London) UK

    BoatIl New Member

    Yes, there is access to the stuffing box. I spoke on the phone with Tony Tucker (whose father designed the boat) and he also suggests leaving the tube in and plugging it. I will cut the strut close to the hull without removing the bolts and leave the log and a stub of the tube, plugged at both ends.
     
Loading...
Similar Threads
  1. CraigC
    Replies:
    15
    Views:
    1,411
  2. captcatch
    Replies:
    4
    Views:
    2,923
  3. Flipsdream
    Replies:
    51
    Views:
    6,388
  4. rfnk
    Replies:
    6
    Views:
    2,714
  5. 58Dunphy
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    5,694
  6. rocky082259
    Replies:
    14
    Views:
    7,384
  7. gforcepdx
    Replies:
    7
    Views:
    5,246
  8. tonyg99
    Replies:
    6
    Views:
    1,490
  9. Wisgibson
    Replies:
    10
    Views:
    1,963
  10. jobterrier
    Replies:
    9
    Views:
    13,418
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.