Remote steering small outboard

Discussion in 'Outboards' started by JordieS, Oct 27, 2011.

  1. JordieS
    Joined: Apr 2011
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    Location: Australia

    JordieS Junior Member

    Hello again everyone,

    Just wondering where everyone gets their steering systems for their small outboards?
    What is the piece that attaches to the engine and pushes it side to side? (I think it is called the cylinder)
    Has anyone done a remote steering setup for twin small outboards, if so where did you get the system for doing this?

    I have been looking at an array of power possibilities for a boat should I build one, but I want to work out where to get the steering etc.

    The reason I ask about the small outboard twin setup is because mainly it is cool and also because the boat may be powered by twin Aquawatt electric outboards that only go up to 30hp.

    Thank you everyone
     
  2. michael pierzga
    Joined: Dec 2008
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    Location: spain

    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Google teleflex...plenty of solutions.
     
  3. JordieS
    Joined: Apr 2011
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    Location: Australia

    JordieS Junior Member

    I've been there I'm just wondering if anyone else has other solutions, I yearn to know more! hahaah
     
  4. pjssailor
    Joined: Jan 2011
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    Location: Pensacola, Florida

    pjssailor Junior Member

    I did not find what I needed either. Most mechanical steering need a bracket from the MFG of the outboard to attach the steering to.
     
  5. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    You can make up a pulley and cable system, though in many places this is frowned on now and they are notorious for slack, sloppiness, breaking, etc.

    You'll need an arm at the engine, at least 4 turning blocks, a tension spring, a rotary helm drum (which you can make) and a shaft mounted wheel. The cables can run down both sides of the boat or just one side, depending on layout. A center console boat requires under the deck cable routing.

    The Teleflex cable systems are much simpler to setup, though you pay for this convenience.

    With remote steering you'll also need remote shift and throttle arrangements. Again, most of this can be home made, such as the levers, engine and control end attachments, etc., but it depends on the boat's setup and your willingness to fabricate.

    It's very hard to beat the control and isolation from the better Teleflex units. Stop by your local boat bone yard and see what they have on an old derelict that isn't good for much else. Hijacking a steering and controls from an old 70's era boat can save a bundle, but it's also likely to need repair or serious maintenance.

    Now that you have a remote helm and controls, you might consider electrical needs too. If you have electric start, it would be nice to do this from the helm. The same for a choke, radio, other electronics and any gauges you might want.
     
  6. tunnels

    tunnels Previous Member

    as already suggested !,blocks and soft wire cable is easy and cheap been done a million times in the early days so nothing new . The bigger the dia the blocks the easyer to steer and less friction on the cable . :idea: Dont forget a drop of oil now and again helps pulleys turn easyer !!The amount of old boats that used small pulleys and never oiled anything was amazing .
     
  7. Easy Rider
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    Location: NW Washington State USA

    Easy Rider Senior Member

    Many small boats of the past had a stick that was anchored on a hinge or similar and the cable is attached about 1' up and the helmsman pushed and pulled the stick. Much faster than a wheel in the harbor. I made a very excellent steering system in the 70s from 1/16" wire cable and cloths line sheaves. Ball bearings and about 5" in dia. Almost no friction and feel like you've never felt. But the sheaves need to be fixed and not moving around for the best system. Springs were needed at the ends to tilt the outboard. I used a drum style steering wheel made for an outboard. Doubt if they are available now. You could put a bracket extending out the side of the engine and attach a rod to the helmsman with a ball joint where bracket and rod attach. Short of a typical lengthened tiller arm that's the bottom of technology. May not be very safe though.
     
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  8. michael pierzga
    Joined: Dec 2008
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    Location: spain

    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Sure...the hydroplane race guys use cable and drum steering. Google it. The system works but its intrusive and difficult to route correctly. Twin outboards would be a challenge. Hard to beat the versatile push pull cable for price, performance.
     
  9. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    The vinyl sheathed cable and pulley systems suck, always have and are notorious for leaving folks stranded without steering. They have too much slack, no feel, can be rattly, rust prone things and generally are frowned on by many states, that require inspections. Pulley arrangement aren't difficult, nor is cable routing, but the hardware adds up quickly and this just introduces the potential for wear, misalignment, adjustment, increase failure possibilities and installation costs. When you add up the pulleys (4 minimum, usually 6 or 8), fair leads, drum, shaft, mount, cable, tension springs, "S" hooks and other assorted gear, you'll rival the Teleflex unit anyway.

    Unless your restoring an antique, that wouldn't be right without this type of system, then spring for a Teleflex cable helm. They're precise, you can bolt any type of wheel you want to it, you can easily route the single cable, engine arms are available for every engine and you will not have to hear the vinyl clad cables, slapping against the side of the boat on every ripple you encounter.
     
  10. Frosty

    Frosty Previous Member

    ALL race boats had cable steering , they were very accurate and precise with feed back giving the feel of the engine. On the power head mounting bolts was a stainless steel plate on each side bringing the attachmets out at least a foot to where the cables were attached. The were tight and held tight by spring tensioners in the system.

    If you ever experienced chine walk at 80mph you need to get hold of that motor.
     
  11. Submarine Tom

    Submarine Tom Previous Member

    Chine hopping at 50 MPH can be an experience too!

    -Tom
     
  12. Frog4
    Joined: Oct 2011
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    Location: Arizona desert

    Frog4 Proletariat


  13. tunnels

    tunnels Previous Member

    iN TAHITI THEY USE THE SAME METHOD FOR CHASING MAHIMAHI AT 60 MPH ,WHEEL IS TO SLOW ,THE TALL JOY STICK IS MUCH QUICKER AND DIRRECT . :p
     
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