relocate start/house batterys (two) from aft. deck to forth deck.

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by the brain, Jul 28, 2017.

  1. SamSam
    Joined: Feb 2005
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    Location: Coastal Georgia

    SamSam Senior Member

    The generator needs plenty of cooling ventilation, kind of hard to do with a box. An errant wave would probably put it out of commission.
     
  2. the brain
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    the brain Senior Member

    yeah will use dive platform at anchorage and aft deck when underway at moderate speeds either mount generator will be strapped down.
     

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  3. SamSam
    Joined: Feb 2005
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    Location: Coastal Georgia

    SamSam Senior Member

    Yamaha, huh. Is that made for marine use, like waterproof or something?
     
  4. Ike
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    Location: Washington

    Ike Senior Member

    Please don't get me started on using a non-marine generator on a boat....ooops too late! In addition to the carbon dioxide issues, there is a problem with grounding a portable generator when it is on a boat. Thus you are introducing an inherent shock hazard. Portable generators are usually set on the ground, or concrete, which grounds them to the earth. Some even have a connection you can attach to a wire, with a metal rod you can drive into the earth (ground). None of this can be done on a boat. Also they are not ignition protected (ignition protected means it won't create a spark and ignite any explosive fumes such as gasoline or hydrogen). Plus they are not made to last in the marine environment; wet and corrosive. There are good reasons why permanently installed generators on boats are required to meet Federal Regulations and be labeled "Marine".
     
  5. the brain
    Joined: Sep 2016
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    the brain Senior Member

    hello Sam & Ike you throw a scare it me about the fumes. this is stuff I don't know about and appreciate you advicing.

    I'm seeing people installing sealed type lead acid batteries like 2 of these 35amp batteries inside a smaller cabin than mine, to power a 12 volt fridge I'd like to have.
    here's the batteries remember 3 days on the vessel is enough for me so I may not even have to replenish these batteries w/ the generator.
    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B...fada53f9664d7b0a0c09770c706c9d&language=en_US

    my start battery is a regular marine start battery w/ the removable lids to add water ( I don't think there where designed to come off to add water or replenish the acid however if this battery is submerged or turned on it's side fluid will drain out) is it this type of battery to not install inside cabin because it's not really sealed?
    and are these smaller sealed type safe inside the cabin.

    here's the fridge
    https://www.amazon.com/Osculati-Iso...22327d4bb8a96844d2632885a22f45&language=en_US

    I've almost finished the dive platform it's just above the waterline kindof close. to for the generator to replenish batteries so I thought strape it down on the aft. gunnel and run it while vessel is in motion.
    Thanks TB
     

  6. Ike
    Joined: Apr 2006
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    Ike Senior Member

    Sealed batteries are sealed in name only. Actually they are called Sealed Valve Regulated (SVR) batteries. The important word is valve. If over charged or over heated they will over pressure and the valve lets fumes escape from the battery. Those fumes are hydrogen. And of course, hydrogen is extremely volatile, but it also has the fortunate attribute that it dissipates rapidly. So where ever you put them they must be in a ventilated space that vents them to the atmosphere. The vent doesn't have to be very big, but must be above the battery. The space also must not have any electrical device in it that might create a spark. If you charge them properly they may never happen to vent gas, but the rules were written to avoid the worst case scenario. This includes Gel Cel and AGM batteries as well as ordinary lead-acid batteries. By the way those fumes (if it vents) are very acidic. and will damage any wiring or fuel lines above the battery. This is why the standards for battery installations require that there not be any fuel lines or wiring above the battery unless there is a deck or top of the compartment separating the batteries from the fuel lines or wiring. Don't install a charger or inverter or any other device directly over the batteries unless there is something separating the two.
     
    bajansailor, the brain and BlueBell like this.
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