refrigeration gas or elec

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by taezow, Sep 14, 2010.

  1. oldsailor7
    Joined: May 2008
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    Location: Sydney Australia

    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    One of the designers (I think it was Jim Brown) lost his boat at dockside when they went ashore for a short errand and left the propane cook stove burning with a pan of potatoes. The potatoes boiled over and extinguished the cooker flame. The gas, being heavier than air started to fill up the bilge. When the gas level reached the fridge pilot light -----------------you get the picture.
     
  2. yipster
    Joined: Oct 2002
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    Location: netherlands

    yipster designer

    as most boats have, a gas cooking stove in a boat should have a thermal gaslock
    when opening the gas no gas comes out, the thermostat takes a sec or two to warm up before the gas opens
    same thing when fire blows out or whatever reason than the thermostat closes the gas
     
  3. CatBuilder

    CatBuilder Previous Member

    Yipster's right.

    That story is a very typical example of how accidents happen on boats. You almost always see several mistakes that, when combined, produce the disaster.

    *There should have been a proper gas stove with thermal shutoff.
    *You should NEVER leave any fire unattended
     
  4. oldsailor7
    Joined: May 2008
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    Location: Sydney Australia

    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    Pehaps it's just me --- but I have never felt safe with a gas bottle aboard my boat. In all my past boats I have only had a two burner metho cooker.
    Mind you, the biggest Tri I have personally owned was only a 28 footer.
    I have sailed on many 40 ft Tris and 45ft Cats and they all had bottled gas.
    I have sailed on monos up to 60ft, but they never seemed to do much cooking. As I remember the crews seemed to only eat peanut butter and jelly on Rye. :rolleyes:
     
  5. cavalier mk2
    Joined: Mar 2010
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    Location: Pacific NW North America

    cavalier mk2 Senior Member

    I was able to add a kerosene stove with oven on the weight saved by losing the propane and plumbing.....
     
  6. yipster
    Joined: Oct 2002
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    Location: netherlands

    yipster designer

    Since a few months I have my first spiritus stove you can use in and ouside
    used once, kerosine same fuel? Safe and odorless inside? Advice?
     
  7. cavalier mk2
    Joined: Mar 2010
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    Location: Pacific NW North America

    cavalier mk2 Senior Member

    The English name for kerosene is paraffin. Mine is a old unit, they are harder to find now but used to be common. A spirit stove might be what we call denatured alcohol such as what the non pressurized stoves by Origo use. They are the safest fuel stove but less efficient because of lower flame temperature. The fuel tends to be more expensive too. I have a portable stove/heater Origo that is safe indoors but the alcohol does put out water vapor so you have to choose your compromises. The kerosene stove doesn't have the explosion problems of propane and the fuel is cheap, there are very odor free fuels available that will also work in a traditional lantern.
     

  8. yipster
    Joined: Oct 2002
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    Location: netherlands

    yipster designer

    thanks and still have to check those fuels as i want my toast just right :D
     

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