Refinishing Cat 22

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by thundercatsHO, Oct 30, 2012.

  1. thundercatsHO
    Joined: Oct 2012
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    thundercatsHO Junior Member

    Hi guys, I just picked up a 72' Cat 22 #822 in amazing shape for it's age. But, of course its gone pretty chalky, and I want to re-coat it, probably paint, awlgrip, interlux, or the like. I want to do the deck and cockpit first. What, if any, is the best way to keep the original waffle-ly non skid on the boat. I would like to try and keep it as original as possible. I have seen boats with the non-skid added to the paint, and to me everyone of them looked like crap. It looks like drywall texture to me and that's just not pretty to me I guess. But, if I paint over it I will loose the original texture I would think. Any ideas?

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  2. sean9c
    Joined: Jan 2011
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    sean9c Senior Member

    I'd do everything I could to try and save the gelcoat. Buff out and wax the smooth surfaces, scrub the non skid with Comet and a stiff brush.
     
  3. thundercatsHO
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    thundercatsHO Junior Member

    Hmm. I think for the hull that is certainly possible, there is little to no crazing or anything, it might buff up fine. The deck, however, has some what of the fine flakyness and light spider cracking in the gelcoat, also around(mostly above) the windows needs to be completely taken down to the glass, there is fairly heavy cracking, I will try to post some pictures. It certainly won't hurt anything to try it first, I just don't think I am going to get the finish I am looking for. Basically, I want it to, well, not look like a 40 year old boat. Also all the deck hardware needs to come off and be re-bedded anyway. It's leaking, and the laminate is still really good, so I don't want it to rot the laminate. That's why I was thinking of just redoing the deck while it's bare. Thanks. By the by, any recommendations on what gelcoat buffing compound to use?
     
  4. philSweet
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    philSweet Senior Member

    The quick and dirty, git-er-done method would be to pull all deck hardware, scrape goo, and pressure wash the devil out of it. Then use an acid wash such as oxalic acid or phosphoric acid and rinse/pressurewash again. This will pretty much remove any oxidation and will ruin the finish, if any, on the hull where it sheets down. It can also hurt anodized ally if it is old and damaged, So pay a bit of attention to where it ends up. Bung all holes etc. Deal with any deck and hatch repairs. If it's just gel spidercracks, grind, fill, sand to shape, put a glaze putty on, and finish that off. I'd paint the deck with a good housepaint such as Ironclad primer with Impervo or Impervex overcoat. The key is to use a good fineline tape and carefully work the painted panel shapes with the correct corner radii and other details. There are a couple of alternate window options if you want to splurge on new stuff. Or you can rebuild the old ones with new gaskets. Contact Catalina. Practically every part for the boat is still available. It's a decent little machine, but I wouldn't get too crazy with it.

    Catalina wasn't very generous with backing plates. You may find quite a few fastener holes that need attention. Minor, less than perfect, repairs can be quickly done by attaching a backing plate with mirror mounts,goo, or a couple of keeper screws; and epoxying the holes (several times maybe), then positioning the hardware and drilling the epoxy and backing plate to take new bolts. This is typical for stanchions and cleats. Make certain, really certain, that the epoxy isn't draining into the boat.

    Rough fit any mods such as stereo speakers, bimini top, or dodger before you do this. Deciding on your canvas color first and mixing paint to match usually works better than the other way around. Jig up and test any rigging or hardware changes first as well. I prefer to build up any new hardware mounting areas on the nonskid with a patch and then sand it smooth.
     
  5. thundercatsHO
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    thundercatsHO Junior Member

    House paint? House paint barely sticks to houses, I can't imagine that working on a boat. I am more than happy to put effort into the boat, bare minimum would be a 2 part like awlgrip or interlux and actually I have no fear of even re spraying gelcoat. I have sprayed it before on some car bodies I did and it turned out fine. I am going to have this boat a LONG time, even if I buy a larger boat I would keep this one. I am one of those people who thinks, just because it's old doesn't mean it can't be really nice just like a new boat. It's a matter of work and a little money. But, definitely thank you for the input, I will take any and all advise I can get. :)
     
  6. philSweet
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    Location: Beaufort, SC and H'ville, NC

    philSweet Senior Member

    The paint I referenced will stick. You just have to get down to a decent substrate. It's not cheap either. You could spray a decent gelcoat for no more money if equipped to do so. There is absolutely nothing improper or shoddy about using a good house paint on a boat. Two part linear polyurethanes would be a complete waste and rather frustrating to work with on this boat. Gel the entire deck and paint the contrast areas. I think the one I mentioned is rather better than the Interlux one part paints. I could be done and sailing before you finished the prep work for an Awlgrip job. The only reason to go with Awlgrip is for the gloss. It actually doesn't like seawater much and a wet rope left coiled on the deck can blister it. It requires a high degree of upkeep and is best for boats that are dry sailed and stored indoors otherwise. The stuff is fine for hull topsides, but poor for decks, IMO. The company that makes Awlgrip makes a wide range of paints for marine aps, so maybe you meant one of the sister products.
     
  7. thundercatsHO
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    thundercatsHO Junior Member

    I wonder what the contrasts were colored with originally. They are grey on my boat. I doubt it's a different colored gelcoat. This is interesting stuff. I appreciate all the info. By the way this is a fresh water boat. Has been all it's life.
     
  8. Paul B

    Paul B Previous Member

    The colored nonskid on Catalinas was gelcoat, done in the mold. The areas were masked off and the colors sprayed in, just like the waterline.

    IIRC there are a couple of nonskids on your boat. The deck, cockpit sole, and cabin top and have the "woven roving" look, and the cockpit seats (and maybe the coaming tops?) have the tiny recessed diamond pattern.

    If you paint, the diamonds will fill with paint and the ridges on the "roving" will smooth. So you will not have a good non-skid surface.

    It would be a big effort, but to do it properly you would fill all the diamond, grind down all the 'roving" and paint with a texture. The new "Kiwigrip" is becoming very popular for this.

    I don't know why anyone would say Awlgrip is not a good paint for the hull or deck. Virtually every custom boat built is painted, and a vast majority of them here in the USA are done with Awlgrip.

    If the boat is to stay in the water I would not paint below the waterline with LP. That should be epoxy coated.
     
  9. sean9c
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    sean9c Senior Member

    Impervo is an interior paint and Impervex is an acrylic (water based) neither is suitable
     
  10. thundercatsHO
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    thundercatsHO Junior Member

    I guess at this point, before I get confused to the point of inaction. LOL What is the advantage 1 over the other between gelcoat and say an awlgrip or interlux. I realize gelcoat requires a crap load of sanding and so on but that isn't what I mean. I really don't care about how much work is involved, I'm not lazy. Would the awlgrip last as long as a gelcoat job? Basically I want to do this once and be done for the next 40 years.
     
  11. Paul B

    Paul B Previous Member

    Gel coat is not an optimal surface. It is porous. It is used by production boatbuilders because it is CHEAP.

    LP is a much better solution.
     
  12. thundercatsHO
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    thundercatsHO Junior Member

    I kind of thought so. Will it last as long though?
     
  13. sean9c
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    sean9c Senior Member

    A good LP job will last 10 yrs+. Downside of LP is that, unlike gelcoat, it's thin. If you bounce off a dock and scratch your gelcoat, likely you wouldn't scratch through it and you can sand, buff and wax it back. LP you will scratch through the paint. Also unless you go with Alexseal you can't patch or rub out your LP. So if you get a scratch your stuck. You're likely to be repainting your LP because it's all scratched and dinged rather than it's lost it's shine.
    You can theoretically patch Alexseal but it's a b*tch to do.
    You could use Awlcraft which is an acrylic/urethane not an LP. It's not quite as tough or shiny but is patchable, it's a good option.
    If it was my boat I'd really try to save all the smooth gelcoat. If you want to redo the nonskid, the best looking but hardest way would be disc off and fill the existing nonskid. Then using LP broadcast Awlgrip's nonskid beads into wet paint then put 2 coats of LP over the top.
    Another thing to think about is if you're going to LP your whole boat you'll likely have $1500 or so in material. LP is expensive.
    If you want to do a quick and easy, but still good looking, job look at Brightsides or one of the other one part urethanes. It won't be as durable but a heck of a lot easier and cheaper.
     
  14. thundercatsHO
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    thundercatsHO Junior Member

    Thanks for all the info guys. Maybe I should just put can of gas on it and burn it? LOL, it just shouldn't be this hard. It's 2012 and we don't have a descent way to fix a boat.
     

  15. messabout
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    messabout Senior Member

    Thundercat; a good quality water based house paint will last half of forever on the interior of your boat. It will also endure outdoor weather longer than any of that scandously overpriced "boat" paint. I would not use it over your gel coat but in some areas it is superior. It is the standard issue for many commercial fishing fleets. The only caution is that it must be allowed to cure for at least ten days to two weeks before it is completely durable and it is not the right stuff below the waterline if the boat is to be kept in the water.
     
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