Reelfoot Lake (Stump Jumper)

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by tnlakeboat, Mar 9, 2014.

  1. tnlakeboat
    Joined: Mar 2014
    Posts: 24
    Likes: 1, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 17
    Location: Union City, TN

    tnlakeboat Junior Member

    Hello everyone, I am from NW TN and honestly haven't boated or fished in years.

    I have acquired a boat made by the Calhouns built for the stumps on reelfoot lake in NW TN. The boat needs the inside bottom completely replaced. I am enclosing some pics. Anyone else on here familiar with this boat please feel free to respond. This has the oar system that allows you to face forward while rowing.
     

    Attached Files:

  2. viking north
    Joined: Dec 2010
    Posts: 1,865
    Likes: 88, Points: 48, Legacy Rep: 1146
    Location: Newfoundland & Nova Scotia

    viking north VINLAND

    Some what of a semi dory definitely built in the same manner with exception there is curvature in the sides. I would say you are also going to have garboard plank work and maybe one or two floor frames depending if the rot got into them. Work on the garboard planks will be your biggest challenge the rest should be pretty straight forward however check the rest of her over carefully. While that bottom rot looks it was the result of her sitting in wet grass for a couple of years, it is pretty advanced and I'd be surprised if you don't find more beyond the garboards. I always get a kick out of those little gas inboards. Reminds me of the old popular mechanics/science articles "Powering your boat with a lawnmower engine". Those great back yard do it yourself hey days. Thats the first time i've seen that design of reverse rowing fittings. They look well built and heavy duty. Wonder of they are still available on the market.
     
  3. tnlakeboat
    Joined: Mar 2014
    Posts: 24
    Likes: 1, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 17
    Location: Union City, TN

    tnlakeboat Junior Member

    I am going to make some calls this week hopefully to the former boat maker and will ask about the availability of the reverse rowing. I am hopping that the wood replacement is confined to the bottom planks. Removing and replacing the ribs will be a job. The hull is fiberglass.Thanks for your response.
     
  4. rwatson
    Joined: Aug 2007
    Posts: 5,852
    Likes: 290, Points: 83, Legacy Rep: 1749
    Location: Tasmania,Australia

    rwatson Senior Member

    It is ? That looked like planking on the inside of the hull in the picture to me.
     
  5. philSweet
    Joined: May 2008
    Posts: 2,338
    Likes: 201, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 1082
    Location: Beaufort, SC and H'ville, NC

    philSweet Senior Member

    I've been in those boats on the lake. Photographing eagles mostly. Wonderful place and a unique bit of boating history. I haven't seen anything else quite like them. Unfortunately, the only photos I have of the boats show an aluminum one. Haven't been there in 30 years, though. Fond memories.

    <edit> now you've made me get my old projector out. I was shooting Ektachrome back then. Still no shots of the woodies.
     
  6. tnlakeboat
    Joined: Mar 2014
    Posts: 24
    Likes: 1, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 17
    Location: Union City, TN

    tnlakeboat Junior Member

    You're right it is planking on the inside....it a bit of q query right now as to what to do with this....going to have some experienced folks take a look and tell me how to replace that bottom. Obviously the old rot has to come out.
     
  7. rwatson
    Joined: Aug 2007
    Posts: 5,852
    Likes: 290, Points: 83, Legacy Rep: 1749
    Location: Tasmania,Australia

    rwatson Senior Member

    Depending on whether you want a pristine boat or not, it may be easier to do a quick and dirty fix. Replacing whole planks as it was built may destroy the structure as a whole.

    The 'easy' method would be to cut out a bad section, then epoxy in a plywood or solid wood patch, one after the other, not all together. For some areas, you can simply grind away the bad sections only as deep as the rot goes , epoxy and glass that section. Later, you can build up any depressions with either timber strips epoxied together, or epoxy mixed with sawdust and cover with some 6 oz glass.

    Once all the patches are in place an cured, sand the whole outside down to bare wood, and cover the whole outside with 6oz fibreglass and epoxy.

    The boat looks like it would be worth the work from here.
     
  8. tnlakeboat
    Joined: Mar 2014
    Posts: 24
    Likes: 1, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 17
    Location: Union City, TN

    tnlakeboat Junior Member

    So you are saying to epoxy/glass the cleaned out wood areas inside? Would there not be another compound to use where wood is concerned?
     
  9. rwatson
    Joined: Aug 2007
    Posts: 5,852
    Likes: 290, Points: 83, Legacy Rep: 1749
    Location: Tasmania,Australia

    rwatson Senior Member

    I think you would be hard pressed to find a better protecter/glue/structural element than fibreglass and epoxy. As I mentioned, if you mix sawdust from sound wood into it, it makes a great, relatively lightweight filler where required.

    Its relatively easy to use and get an effective result, with a little bit of research and practice.

    As long as it got painted as well, it would last for a long time.
     
  10. tnlakeboat
    Joined: Mar 2014
    Posts: 24
    Likes: 1, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 17
    Location: Union City, TN

    tnlakeboat Junior Member

    Thanks! I really appreciate the interest and feedback......means a lot.
    I will post pics of my progress.
     
  11. tnlakeboat
    Joined: Mar 2014
    Posts: 24
    Likes: 1, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 17
    Location: Union City, TN

    tnlakeboat Junior Member

    Most of bottom wood removed. Might go with marine plywood instead of cypress.
     

    Attached Files:

  12. viking north
    Joined: Dec 2010
    Posts: 1,865
    Likes: 88, Points: 48, Legacy Rep: 1146
    Location: Newfoundland & Nova Scotia

    viking north VINLAND

    I think i'm finally getting the drift of this crafts construction and why. This is basically a fiberglass hull reinforced with wood framing and a heavy wood floor . No doubt to protect against those slightly submerged tree stumps. Marine ply coated and set in epoxy would indeed do a good job. A few layers of glass cloth and epoxy on the floor wouldn't do any harm either.I'm assuming you still want protection against those wooden icebergs :)
     
  13. rwatson
    Joined: Aug 2007
    Posts: 5,852
    Likes: 290, Points: 83, Legacy Rep: 1749
    Location: Tasmania,Australia

    rwatson Senior Member

    I think its actually a planked hull, with a fibreglass outer skin. You cant insert wood like this into a pre-existing fibreglass hull.

    Marine Ply would be OK for patches, but if you can get solid cypress to insert, its a better solution. Marine ply tends to come apart at the edges, so patches with marine ply need a lot more edge work than solid wood if that is practical.

    I suggest that you aim for "full encapsulation", which is epoxy and glass on both the inside and the outside of the hull, if practical. Certainly, an epoxy coating with light glass on the inside over the 'patches' would make it a better job.
     
  14. tnlakeboat
    Joined: Mar 2014
    Posts: 24
    Likes: 1, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 17
    Location: Union City, TN

    tnlakeboat Junior Member

    The key is getting the structure anchored back together with all the proper load bearing points with the existing fiberglass hull in place. A lot easier when building from scratch. Ready to cut the new floor and place. Have the cypress wood. Got from a local mill. Paid 25.00 for 32 board feet. That included planing.
     

  15. rwatson
    Joined: Aug 2007
    Posts: 5,852
    Likes: 290, Points: 83, Legacy Rep: 1749
    Location: Tasmania,Australia

    rwatson Senior Member

    Yes indeed. Don't be afraid to 'pack out' any gaps between 'patches' with lots of epoxy mixed with sawdust to ensure totally tight joins.

    To save a bit of sanding, you can steal some plastic wrap from the kitchen, and lay it over any filler areas. You can then 'manipulate' the epoxy into flat, level conditions.

    When the epoxy is cured, the plastic will peel off the epoxy, leaving a nice fairly flat smooth surface ready for a light sand and paint, as apposed to a rough, grainy, sharp pointed mess.

    Fibreglass suppliers sell 'peelply', designed to do the same thing more easily. The savings in time, effort, abrasive materials and lung dust make it a good idea.


    edit


    PS - drill some small diameter holes in the new planks, to make sure that the thickened epoxy between the existing fibreglass and the underside of the plank is thick enough. You should see the thicker epoxy ooze a little out of the holes. Dont be afraid to put small diameter holes right through the hull to pull the planks in tight. Rather than use bolts to pull the plank and out hull together, use wire. Its easier to remove with a soldering iron after the epoxy cures, if the beeswax on the wire doesnt prevent adhesion. Obviously fill any construction holes later.
     
Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.