Redoing wood floor the proper way round two

Discussion in 'Boatbuilding' started by the brain, Aug 5, 2017.

  1. ondarvr
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    ondarvr Senior Member

    Typical paints are are very poor at sealing or waterproofing anything, so don't assume that using any type of paint will help preserve plywood in a wet environment.
     
  2. the brain
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    the brain Senior Member

    Very informative stickie on goo. Thanks Par



    ?1.how to clean brand new raw plywood prior to gooing?


    ?2.w/ the pumps mearsuring the 5:1 ratio why filthy two containers then pour into one container?
    like can't I just pump into one container?


    Previous gooing job I stode up wood (pictured and gooed the edge’s then came back and applied to bottom then top) each a day apart.

    ?3.How long will this expoxy get hard unstickie where I can rotate the board and hopefully cover whole board in one day? like will soft stickie goo stick to cured goo?

    ?4.will one quart be enough goo to cover 4’x 67”

    TB
     
  3. SamSam
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    SamSam Senior Member

    Plus the preservative chemicals in the plywood or lumber will corrode your aluminum boat and most fastenings very quickly.

    Read the descriptions and specs for what you use before you use it, better yet, before you buy it. The birch ply you used is stated to be for interior use, the rustoleum marine paint says one or two coats of their primer are needed on wood AND fiberglass before the Topside paint.

    Plenty of boats are built using polyester and about the cheapest exterior ply available for decks/soles/floors. Plenty are also repaired or replaced using the same materials. Crappy materials used well can easily outlast good materials used crappily. Just about anything will last a "few years", depending on what you mean by few.
    I don't think paint or resin alone will work for a plywood floor as the plywood will check and let moisture in. It won't be tough enough for throwing stuff around, dropping anchors etc. Puncture the waterproofing layer anywhere and there goes the waterproofing.

    If it was mine, I would use the plywood Gonzo posted. I'd prep it by sanding the bottom with a 24-36 grit disk, followed by blowing and/or vacuuming the dust away, and seal the bottom and edges with a few layers of polyester. NOT WAXED resin and not Bondo or just about anything from an auto parts or West Marine type store. You can shop online and get just about anything delivered to your door. Attach it to the stringers. Sand the top and apply a coat of resin. Let it cure enough so there is no chance any more resin will be sucked into the wood, but the resin is still green enough so the laminating layer will still chemically bond. A few hours to maybe overnight.

    Then I'd roll on a bunch of resin, cover it with some 1-1/2 oz mat and more resin to properly saturate the mat. The mat serves the purpose of toughening the deck for dropped anchors etc, keeping the ply from checking and improving the water resistance of the poly resin.

    I might use latex porch and floor paint for the finish, or for a more durable and more water resistance coating, a coat of WAXED gelcoat.

    The nonskid tiles you are thinking of are probably a bad idea. If they don't shift around and wear holes through the deck coatings, they'll be a nuisance to clean. You'd have to pick them up to clean them (or dip them overboard) as you couldn't wash all the crap out of them even with a pressure washer. You wouldn't want to leave them down all the time as they would collect dirt and hold water all over the deck, which you don't want.

    Usually the texture of the mat and the texture of rolled gelcoat is plenty of traction for a boat. If you want, you can use A VERY LITTLE sand in the deck coating. That kind of deck is easy to clean.

    I've never used epoxy, so if you want to use that, the procedure would be different in a few ways, so there's that. No mat, for instance and no wax either, I think.

    If the OM used 5/8 ply, I would use at least that. 3/4 would work too, depending on if the little extra weight (10 #?) would be OK. That would be a lot stronger and then, even if it did rot, it would take longer to do it. So, for a few more pounds of weight and a few more dollars for the ply, you might get an extra year or so before it had to be repaired or replaced again.
    5/8 ply will have 4 or 5 plys, 5 is better. 3/4 will have 5 or 7 plys, 7 is better. That's not counting face plys that are really thin, like probably on that birch cabinet wood.

    Remember about treated wood and aluminum. It can destroy your boat quickly.
     
  4. the brain
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    the brain Senior Member

    Removed the rotten plywood, dam that stuff smelt bad and was heavey, will need to vacumn up the mess.


    The rotten wood may have been a blessing in disguise, the engine relocation w/ the POD and the big knee brace bolted to each stringer has stressed the stringers all the revitos are broken. I am very hard on a hull and navigate usalley at high speeds reguardless of seas.


    These where double small rivots from the factory two per latitubale hump.


    I will redrill and rerevito w/ ¼” revits from orginale location inside stringer,


    Then fab up a flange same height as stringer and revito to stringer then revito to outside of hump basicalley doublleing up revitos.

    I believe these revitos broke because flooring was'nt secured to stringers was just laying ontop of stringers.


    Rememeber the aft deck where anchors ect. Will be dropped on 1/8” aluminum floor not Plywood

    PW will be mostely inside (BTW the orginale PW from factory on inside is still sturdy (not rotten) the new PW floor will only extend about a 12” to outside however this time it won’t be exposed to rain I have a storage cover now.


    Edit also plan to add latitubale stringers to help surpot the floor, one on the orginale motor wooden mount then fab another just in front of bilge cover.

    I'm anixious to seal new marine PW uncertain of floation inside vessel.probablley poured foam on outside of stringers inside bladers

    Thanks Guys for surport
    TB
     

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    Last edited: Aug 9, 2017
  5. the brain
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    the brain Senior Member

    what do Guy's think of the snapped rivtos?
     
  6. the brain
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    the brain Senior Member

    waterproofing (I hope) new floor

    can top protective coat be bondo and matting?

    concidering relocating primary fuel tank to under deck then have another reserve tank in it's place.

    still waiting for feedback on what do Guy's think of the snapped rivtos?

    plan to rerivto add/splice a Z to outside of stringer then tack weld.
    thanks TB
     

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    Last edited: Aug 17, 2017
  7. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    First of all, get rid of that linseed oil. Secondly, no, Bondo and mat is not better than laying a carpet on top of it.
     
  8. the brain
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    the brain Senior Member

    it states on the bottle seals wood why not mixup all 3 linseed oil/mineral spirits/boat varnish I have been informed that this is the old timers reciept for waterproofing.
     

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  9. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Old timers added lead to it. Without lead you are feeding the mold and fungus with the oil.
     
  10. the brain
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    the brain Senior Member

    after this 3part solution dries 3 day I add 2 coats of marine varnish.

    remember I'm using marine plywood same as the leftover piece thats been in backyard exposed to rain for over one year and still intacked
     
  11. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Read the technical data for the Rustoleum varnish. It requires all oil to be removed from the surface. If you already oiled it, only an oil based varnish may work, but they are fairly soft.
     
  12. the brain
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    the brain Senior Member

    I'm waiting for the solution to dry 3 days, next will add the 2 coats of marine varnish. then Bondo fiberglass resin w/ mat.
    here's the bondo stuff I'm using look at the container it has a image of a boat so it must be boat worthy? I also have a large exterior type carpet it usalley covers the warm aluminim aft.decking.
     

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  13. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    If you are fiberglassing over oil and varnish, it won't work.
     
  14. SamSam
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    SamSam Senior Member

    Did someone tell you polyester resin sticks to varnish?

    Old time recipes have been replaced by modern materials 99% of the time because they are an improvement.
     

  15. SamSam
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    SamSam Senior Member

    How thick is your marine plywood and how many plies does it have?
     
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