record attempt to cross the atlantic in a 16' boat

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by capt vimes, Jan 17, 2014.

  1. capt vimes
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    capt vimes Senior Member

    it is essentially a proof of concept - the little boat is build entirely of a new fiber named fipofix...
    it says on the site of the manufacturer that this fiber is made from volcanic material and backed together with some alternative to epoxy resin - unfortunately the site does not tell you more...

    nevertheless - austrian sailor harald sedlacek (son of norbert sedlacek - the only austrian ever to compete and finish the vendee globe) left today from gijon, spain to do the crossing to st. augustine, florida:
    http://www.open16.com/index.php/en/

    this is the second attempt, because during the first norbert sedlacek at that time hit an UFO in the biscaya damaging the rudder and diverting to gijon, spain.
    here are some aerials of the boat taken during the first attempt:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jgxdr8iNhX4
     
  2. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Hit a UFO ? Never mind about the basalt boat, what about the UFO ! :eek:
     
  3. capt vimes
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    capt vimes Senior Member

    unidentified Floating object? ;)
     
  4. messabout
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    messabout Senior Member

    The skipper is apparently into self flagellation. There have already been transats in tiny boats. So what is left to prove except that the boat is reasonably able and definitely lucky? More than that, the skipper is almost surely a very experienced and competant long distance sailor.

    Stunts of this kind may have some marketing value when aimed toward the freshman sailor. If completed siuccessfully, the manufacturer can now tout the incredible feat and lull the amateur or beginning sailor into the absurd belief that his boat is invinceable, much to the peril of the learner.

    I wish the adventureous skipper well. may he have fair winds, smooth seas, and no equipment failures.
     
  5. pdwiley
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    pdwiley Senior Member

    John Riding in the 'Sea Egg' for one. 12' long. Back in the 1960's.

    Not only did he cross the Atlantic, he crossed the Pacific to New Zealand only to be lost at sea heading for Australia.

    Henri Bombard drifted across the Atlantic in a life raft.

    So a 16' boat across the Atlantic - so what? Old news.

    PDW
     
  6. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

    If I was a manufacturer of some gee-whiz boatbuilding material, I wouldn't risk getting embarrassed when my small boat disappeared in the Atlantic..

    You would always be asking - 'was it the construction' ?
     
  7. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Oceanic Sailors are always looking for sponsorship..to gain this sponsor money you need publicity.

    This is what he is doing...

    Wish him luck and more sponsors
     
  8. philSweet
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    philSweet Senior Member

    One fine looking boat. I like everything about it. I think I might want some system for leecloths on a transatlantic crossing, but they probably have the boat as clean as possible for the photo shoots. I'm a bit surprised that all the lines are on the deck. Simple to inspect, but it's really hard to move around on a boat this small in bad weather and big seas with a dozen lines on the foredeck.

    In the sail inventory, It lists a "foch". Don't know that one. Any help out there?
     
  9. SamSam
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    SamSam Senior Member

    It's just a promotional stunt for a somewhat opaque company touting 'patented' FIPOFIX®-Positioning technology. They don't make fibers, they developed a system that assembles them into fabric without breaking the delicate fibers. It's not about the sailor, it's not about the boat, it's about the FIPOFIX®-Positioning technology. The boat and sailor and crossings are to attract attention to the fabrics/manufacturing process.

    I can't see where it proves anything unless it is state of the art construction, as light as possible and thereby gets tested to the max. I mean you could probably make a heavy enough 16' boat out of dirty socks and epoxy that would work.
     
  10. pogo
    Joined: Mar 2010
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    pogo ingenious dilletante

    You need glasses ?;)

    Not "foch" , but " Fock" , it' s german for "jib"


    http://www.open16.com/index.php/en/proof-of-principle/fipofix-open-16








    "Foch" was a famous french General in WW I, after him the french named an aircraft carrier.


    pogo
     
  11. philSweet
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    philSweet Senior Member

    well, that explains why the translate button wasn't helping.:rolleyes:
     
  12. capt vimes
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    capt vimes Senior Member

    well i know that and that's also the reason why i wrote in my opening post, that "it is essentially a proof of concept" ... should have probably added that i also do not see the record they try to break... ;)
     
  13. JosephT
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    JosephT Senior Member

    Always interesting to learn about new fibers used for construction. Let's hope the hull holds up well for this ocean crossing!

    I was a bit surprised to read about the "fire proof" nature of this fiber. If anybody knows more about this material (aside from what is described on the nebulous web site) please post.
     
  14. Joris
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    Joris Junior Member

    Joseph,
    you can find out more about the vulcanic fibres if you google "basalt fibre"
    It has been around for over 30 years but never was very popular. With increasing costs to recycle glassfibre it is gaining popularity and prices are decending rapidly.
     

  15. JosephT
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    JosephT Senior Member

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