Recommended types of interior veneer

Discussion in 'Materials' started by mcintire2, Jan 6, 2011.

  1. mcintire2
    Joined: Jan 2011
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    Location: Alameda, CA

    mcintire2 New Member

    First off, I am not a boat person, no offense to any of you out there, but if I use the wrong terminology, please excuse me.

    My daughter's fiance owns a ~51' cabin cruiser that has, over the years sustained a moderate amount of water damage to the interior ply/veneer. It's bad enough that sanding/staining/finishing will not hide and/or excerbate the differences in the affected wood. In order to "keep the money in the family" so to speak, they have asked me to refinish the interior prior to selling the boat (after repairing the windows, etc, whose leakage caused the damage) Now, in past lives I've built custom furniture with all types of exotic hardwoods, but I've never worked on a marine vessel. I was thinking that I could overlay the existing interior teak plywood (which is very water-stained, but sound) with a pre-applied hot-melt glue veneer and finish the entire cabin area to match. If this approach has been tried and found acceptable, is there a species of veneer that is more appropriate than others? Is there something I'm not taking into consideration? I do know that the hot-melt glue, itself, is totally waterproof, once applied properly, which I've done many times. This whole 'marine' concept has me doubting some of my past knowledge and experience. Thanks for any help you may be able to provide.
     
  2. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    gonzo Senior Member

    I think that using the same species of wood makes sense. The melt glue seems to hold Ok on interiors. I have used a lot on edging and have never seen problems. Other people who routinely use it are also satisfied. The interior of a boat would be about the same environment as a bathroom in a house.
     
  3. mcintire2
    Joined: Jan 2011
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    Location: Alameda, CA

    mcintire2 New Member

    Thanks

    Thank you Gonzo. That's exactly what I was thinking. I've used this product several times to overlay areas within bathrooms and, provided it's sealed and finished properly, I haven't experienced any real issues with it. I know the idea sounds solid, but have you know anyone who actually used this concept?

    Thanks
     
  4. Landlubber
    Joined: Jun 2007
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    Landlubber Senior Member

    ....many new boats are built with structural type ply bulkhead and finished with either veneers or usually thin sided plywood (it hides the irregularities better than single veneers)....not a worry mate.
     
  5. Landlubber
    Joined: Jun 2007
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    Location: Brisbane

    Landlubber Senior Member

    ...oh, and do as Gonzo says, use the same veneer as the solid woods, makes finishing so much easier.
     
  6. jim lee
    Joined: Feb 2007
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    Location: Anacortes, WA

    jim lee Senior Member

    We infuse the glass right onto the veneer itself. Make a wonderful bond. (using the veneer as the gelcoat)

    -jim lee
     

  7. Frosty

    Frosty Previous Member

    Crikey---- Little bit over the top there I would say. Maybe even a lot over the top.
     
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