Recommendation for a seakeeping book

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by ldigas, Sep 5, 2012.

  1. ldigas
    Joined: Feb 2011
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    ldigas Senior Member

    I'm looking for a seakeeping book or paper that deals with the problem of motions of crane pontoons (the pontoons, which don't necessary have to be pontoon-shaped, onto which cranes are mounted. You see them in harbours all the time. Just floating around :D).

    Since my general knowledge on the subject of seakeeping is a little rusty, all seakeeping books which present the topic in a clear and understandable manner are welcomed, actually.
     
  2. Ad Hoc
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    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    A good "general" all round book is Theory of Seakeeping by Korvin-Kroukovsky.

    What is it in particular you wish to investigate?
     
  3. RThompson
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    RThompson Senior Member

    another well regarded book is "Seakeeping: Ship Behaviour in Rough Weather" by Adrian Lloyd.
    I know ships in rough weather doesnt sound much like crane pontoons in harbours, but it is all seakeeping. I'd expect this book to get you back up to speed. It's also likely to be in any library that claims to have that flavour of book.
    Rob
     
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  4. Ad Hoc
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    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    Rob,

    Yes an excellent book :idea:
     
  5. ldigas
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    ldigas Senior Member

    Motions of floating cranes in enclosed environments (harbours, most often), from waves and wind. But I'm not sure that many publicly available papers are available on the subject.

    Apart from that - seakeeping general-wise - I'm mostly interested in practical methods, less in theoretical background for them.
     
  6. Ad Hoc
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    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    For practical methods, you need to conduct motion/seakeeping experiments of a model in different wave spectrum's to obtain typical RAOs.

    Otherwise it is a lot of hard slogging of the theory, and is a little suspect to accuracy since the coefficients are not so readily available for "non-typical" planform shapes.
     
  7. ldigas
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    ldigas Senior Member

    Actually, I ment "practical methods" as in worked examples and such.

    As to the other part, yup, I agree. But I somehow expected that pontoon hull shapes and such would be considered rather typical in this kind of analysis. In any case, thanks! Will go and see if they have the mentioned title in the local library, or if anyone around here has it.

    For now I found this (second or third file from the top, the larger one) a good introductory read. http://www.shipmotions.nl/DUT/LectureNotes/index.html
     
  8. Ad Hoc
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    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    In that case I can also recommend

    "Dynamics of Marine Vehicles", by Rameswar Bhattacharyya.
    Sits on my books self nicely :)

    Thanks for the URL, those look interesting too. Always enjoy adding to my library :D
     

  9. Submarine Tom

    Submarine Tom Previous Member

    Seaworthiness, The Forgotten...
     
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