rebuild nautica rib 13

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by luix, Jan 25, 2011.

  1. luix
    Joined: Jan 2011
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    Location: panama

    luix Junior Member

    hi everyone
    im new here, and pleased for share with you the passion for the boats.
    i have a nautica 13ft inflatable, rigid floor, with a yamaha 90hp inboard jet engine.
    but.... the inflatables are hurts and rotten, it have a lot of air leaks
    so i want rebuild it in fiber glass... but i dont have a clear idea what i have to do...
    http://s872.photobucket.com/albums/ab284/luix02/?action=view&current=P1010305.jpg

    alguien ha hecho algo parecido?

    I appreciate all of your contributions and greetings from panama
     
  2. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Not getting much help here, but your vessel has a decidedly second-hand appearance, though. If the tubes are beyond redemption for holding air, maybe you can stuff them with a flexible closed cell foam like polyethylene. Just an idea, not a recommendation, I don't know how feasible that is, but it could be a low-cost solution. That way it should be resistant to Chupacarbra attacks. :D
     
  3. luix
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    luix Junior Member

    had thought of that, but the problem is that I will gain too much weight to the engine that I have ... if it is second hand, was left almost 5 years. yesterday i can unlock the engine:)
     
  4. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Foam is about 2lb/cu ft or thereabouts, not that cheap, won't absorb water to any extent worth worrying about, but you are johnny-on-the-spot, you can do your sums and come up with the answers re extra weight etc.
     
  5. BATAAN
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    BATAAN Senior Member

    I have seen this done and it worked well. Remove the tubes. Buy 1/8" fiberglass sheet from an industrial supplier. Form topsides "planks" from this material to the proper boat shape with the bow flaring out and some flare all the way back, and stitch them to the hull temporarily with zip-ties or tie wire through small drilled holes. Adjust till fair and looks right. Using WEST system resin and fillers (see their book about fiberglass repairs to understand the techniques) make fillets to join the parts. Now apply glass to the corners on the outside, thicker material at sheer etc. Use only epoxy and remember epoxy sticks to polyester but polyester will NOT stick to epoxy. Finish with polyurethane paints.
    The guy I saw do it years ago built a very nice boat really quick this way.
     
  6. luix
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    luix Junior Member

    can you get some photo...
    i want see the work to make an idea...
     
  7. BATAAN
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    BATAAN Senior Member

    Sorry, it was many years ago and far away and I had no camera.
    It was just a stitch and glue job, like a plywood kayak kit, but the panels were fiberglass sheet instead of plywood, heavily filleted and glassed to the lower RIB hull, making a non-RIB boat. The final shape was quite conventional, a stem shape in the bow, flaring sides back to a transom. All quite stout and looked good. Much more durable than a RIB but lacks the flotation and bouncy bumper sides.
     
  8. luix
    Joined: Jan 2011
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    luix Junior Member


  9. luix
    Joined: Jan 2011
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    luix Junior Member

    anybody?
     
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