Real Mahogany or NOT

Discussion in 'Powerboats' started by KND, Dec 1, 2010.

  1. KND
    Joined: Nov 2007
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    KND Naval Architect

    We have designed a classic sportster and the finish of the boat must be mahogany look alike......but no wood to be used.
    Well we have done it and the mahogany boat was released from the mold and one cannot see the difference whether the wood finish is real or not.
    Trade secrets.....
    www.navaldesign.co.za CT80-5.jpg

    23112010257.jpg

    23112010258.jpg

    23112010273.jpg
     
  2. rasorinc
    Joined: Nov 2007
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    rasorinc Senior Member

    You have certainly got the color right. Nice looking..........................
     
  3. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Mahogany has several unique features that make it nearly imposable to duplicate and no man made rendition will compete with real mahogany, in spite of your claims. Interestingly enough, your supplied images are so small that close examination to see if it actually looks like mahogany can't be preformed. How convenient of you. Even high resolution photos of mahogany will not look like real mahogany in 3D, because mahogany dramatically changes color as the light reflects off the silica. So, post a moderately large image, that can be closely examined and see how well it stands actual scrutiny. As to the color, that what mahogany looks like when it's stained, which to many is just a way to ruin the look of the wood.
     
  4. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Hackercraft in Florida was making that about seventeen years ago. From a distance they looked like mahogany.
     
  5. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    My dress shoes from a distance look like mahogany . . .
     
  6. Commuter Boats
    Joined: Oct 2006
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    Commuter Boats Commuter Boats

    Can it be repaired?
     
  7. fg1inc

    fg1inc Guest

    Wanna trade Par? Cause up close or from a distance, mine look like dung!
     
  8. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    I have dung looking ones too, try someone else . . .
     
  9. variverrunner
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    variverrunner Junior Member

  10. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Fibreglast's products are interesting, but it's easy to see the "step and repeat" pattern in most of them. They are very effective on counter tops and in places where no one knows wood very well. Printed veils have been used before, including replacement patches designed specifically to repair the exact sections damaged (read really difficult to align). I've never seen a 2 dimensional product produce the refractive qualities of certain woods, such as mahogany, teak and several other species.

    I too should bid them good luck with their endeavors, now that I've spanked their idea firmly.
     
  11. tom28571
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    tom28571 Senior Member

    I'm sure they can fool most of the buying public that also buys photgraphic wood finishes in home furniture and wall paneling. Eric Sponberg also designed a similar runabout a few years ago. I asked him how it would be repaired and, as I remember, the answer was that it would go back to the builder for a redo. No knowledgeable wood person would be fooled by such a material though.

    It comes down to honesty in the materials used. Plastic is fine as long as it is labeled as plastic and not fake something else. Where the line is drawn here is a personal thing. Most people will accept some level of fakery. Think Hardieboard as home siding which is much more durable and lower maintenance than the real thing. I draw the line at stucco foam stone architectural details and photographic plastic overlays in boats. Others will draw the line at some other level.
     
  12. WickedGood

    WickedGood Guest

    Looks like a very Bristol Watercraft. I could sell them to people on Golden Pond quite sucessfully.





    "My dress shoes from a distance look like mahogany"

    They have a Cure for that.

    http://www.fauxfarmgirl.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/04/web-****-boots.jpg
     
  13. cthippo
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    cthippo Senior Member

    It looks like it was carved from a solid block of wood. Real or not, it looks nice.

    Depending on what look you're going for, it's almost too perfect though. It's obvious that it's not wood because of the lack of seams. The appeal is going to be to the crowd that sees their boat as an extension of their manhood, but fortunately this is a pretty lucrative demographic. It will defiantly turn heads and therefore will probably sell well.
     

  14. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Everything looks good at 72 DPI . . .
     
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