readings in small sailboat design?

Discussion in 'Education' started by scotdomergue, May 1, 2009.

  1. scotdomergue
    Joined: Jan 2009
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    Location: Twisp, WA USA

    scotdomergue Scot

    I'm interested in learning principals (and application) of design for small mono-hull sailboats, particularly racing dinghies (for example, the International Contender, though I'm not interested in trapeze sailing). Any suggestions for reading (or maybe other approaches?) will be greatly appreciated.

    I want to understand hull design related to speed and seaworthiness, also about sail rigs (most interested in cat rig, but would also like to understand alternatives), centerboards (and other approaches to ressisting lateral drift), rudders, balancing the hull and rig, weather helm - and whatever else. I'm interested in issues related to planing, and also for displacement sailing. I'm also interested in issues related to performance when propelled by oars (including sliding-seat rowing); resistance related to wetted surface and to hull shape, hull shape as related to performance on different points of sail, etc., etc.

    I've been sailing all my life and have a good general understanding of some of this, but have never had technical training. I've recently been reading a good bit on the web, but there are many gaps and probably some basics I'm missing. I studied engineering many years ago, and have a good aptitude for design and construction in general (have designed and built a number of houses and have a little experience with boat repair and boat building as well as design and create in other realms).

    I'd like to start with a good bit of reading, preferably introductory and/or intended for a lay reader, without too much technical jargon or advanced math (I'm quite competent with general math and algebra, but haven't used much trig for many years, let alone calculus).

    Any suggestions will be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks,
    Scot
     
  2. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    There are many to choice from, we all have favorites, but none will get you everything you need. Eventually your library will grow as you absorb the information and your interest requires more intensive study.

    A good start can be found here.

    http://books.boatdesign.net/
     
  3. scotdomergue
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    scotdomergue Scot

    Thanks

    Thanks Par. I had looked at that page, but with your encouragement have looked more closely and will try to get my hands on some of the books. So many are about "yacht" design, which sounds larger to me, not to mention the difficulty of deciding which books are more or less relevant to my interests. Any more specific suggestions will be appreciated! Again, thanks! Scot
     
  4. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Principles of Yacht Design is a standard, though a little thick for the novice to absorb, as is Elements of Yacht Design.

    You may want to start with Understanding Yacht Design (Nicolson) and decide if you what to pursue a more in depth study.
     
  5. scotdomergue
    Joined: Jan 2009
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    scotdomergue Scot

    Thanks again! My regional library system has Principals, and I've ordered it. I've also requested that they try to get the others 2 you mention and a couple of others. I should have enough to keep me occupied for a while.
     
  6. fcfc
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    fcfc Senior Member

    "Principles of yacht design" is a very good book, but the main sample design is a 40 ft fiberglass sailboat. It is well suited to 30 - 50 ft non planning sailboats.

    I have not yet found practical books for smallers boats, where planning is more common, and crew weight is more important relative to boat size.
     
  7. daiquiri
    Joined: May 2004
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    daiquiri Engineering and Design

    "The Symmetry of Sailing: The Physics of Sailing for Yachtsman" by Ross Garrett.

    You will find all the physics you need to know in order to understand in-depth how a sailyacht work.
    Once you get a firm grasp on sailboat's physics, it's all about applying that knowledge creatively for a specific design you're into.

    http://www.amazon.com/Symmetry-Sailing-Physics-Yachtsman/dp/1574090003
     

  8. scotdomergue
    Joined: Jan 2009
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    Location: Twisp, WA USA

    scotdomergue Scot

    Thanks fcfc & daiquiri,

    I have a copy of Principles from my library, and while I'm learning things, as you say fcfc, the orientation is not exactly what I'm looking for.

    I'll see if the library can also get Symmetry.

    It would be nice to find readings that apply more specfically to my interests. I've been working on a design concept for a very light sailing-rowing-cruising boat - essentially a cruising dinghy with very small cabin adequate for me to sleep inside, weighing less than 200 lbs, including all sailing and rowing rigging (sliding seat rowing) - current version 15 1/2 feet LOA and some hull shape similarities to the International Contender, though slightly greater beam, and other modifications. Taking some design ideas from Ocean Rowing craft, I hope to create a boat that would safely handle extreme conditions and cross oceans if I ever decide I want to do that.

    It's an interesting project, and I'm learning a great deal as I go. I strongly suspect that I'll eventually want help to finalize the design before moving on to building it. At this point I want to focus on learning and understanding. Again, any readings that relate more closely to the issues I'm working on are appreciated!

    Thanks again.
    Scot
     
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