Re-decking 1906 Lozier Launch

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by sammy2, Dec 8, 2006.

  1. sammy2
    Joined: Dec 2006
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    Location: illinois

    sammy2 Junior Member

    I would like to re-deck a 1906 lozier launch 25' "lake special" any help in types of wood "planking" for this project, as to keep original? also what is the procedure for this project, Im hoping i can figure it out by removing old deck, but any tips or tricks would be very helpful. thank you!
     
  2. lacasmarine
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    Location: gainesville , ga

    lacasmarine Junior Member

    If done a few old crist-crafts and i havefound that you start at the top and work down house windscreen rub-rails till you get to the deck most of the decks i've seen is 1/2'' over 1/2'' ply the easys way is to remove the plugs then the screws. then the whole thing.leaving a big open hole where your deck used to be then fix any thing that needs fixing lay down your 1/2'' ply and dry fit your king board and decking.
    hope that helps you some.
     
  3. sammy2
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    sammy2 Junior Member

    Thanks lacasmarine, the deck appears to be made of 1x2 mahogany? with no ply-wood base. is it mahogany? and how are the 1x2's butted as to keep a leak-less deck? are the white painted stripes at the seams just for looks or is that some kind of putty or okum? Im new to antique boat repair but am pretty decent at wood working, any help?
     
  4. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    There are several threads on this subject. You can use the search button at the top of the page and take a look.

    Your decks are laid. They are generally tongue and groove, though can also be traditional planked (no groove). This usually depends on the decking thickness and the beam spacing used. Both of these types of decking have a caulking (the "white painted stripes") seam, which isn't paint, but originally an oil based compound that kept moisture from getting to the actual caulking (string) and rotting it.

    Your boat will have no plywood in it originally, but will be traditionally "stick" built. If you're attempting a restoration, then carefully document the process with lots of photos as it comes apart. They will be invaluable come time to reassemble and can be used to explain what was there after you've hit a stumbling block and need help.

    Unless the boat has a particularly high value, for what ever reason (racing history, previous ownership, etc.) I wouldn't recommend the original style deck be put back on. Those decks leaked like spaghetti strainers and we have much better, stronger, lighter versions, that look like the old ones, that don't leak.

    Re-doing a deck is a big job, especially on a boat that old. The average backyard repair guy will have some difficulty with this type of repair. Go slow, remove everything that is attached, take lots of picture along the way and keep her dry during the process. If the deck has been leaking for very long, you'll have some rot in the beams, hanging knees, carlines, deck opening framing, etc. This starts at the fastener holes and leak points, then gets worse as it is neglected.

    My best recommendation is to find a good boat carpenter and have him give it a fine once over. He'll have recommendations as to what is truly going on and how to go about fixing it.

    Usually when you remove a deck, you find a host of other problems that need addressing. A carpenter or full blown survey will let you know what you're up against.
     
  5. sammy2
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    sammy2 Junior Member

    Par; Thank you for the info. I couldn't find any other threads on this, I will be going to the library to research this further! Im very interested in this deck(caulking). From the bottom view there is no sign of this present. I will begin to remove the deck on monday and will heed your advise on documantation! any other insight to this project would be appreciated! once again Thank You
     
  6. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    It's very possible you have a double planked deck which would hide the seams from above, but there still would be seams of some sort. This is a stick built boat, meaning she is planked and constructed from dimensional lumber. The seams on the underside of the deck should be tight, just the top of the seam, in tongue and groove, will be wide, to provide a place for the caulk and seam sealant to live. It's also possible you have had renovations performed on the boat, prior to your ownership, possibly hiding seams below decks. You'll learn much about her construction during disassembly. I still strongly advise you find a carpenter or have a surveyor look her over. These are skills and techniques darn near lost to modern boaters and repair people. Out of every 100 guys you find that work on boats, maybe one will actually know what he's talking about in regard to this boat. There aren't many who work on these very old wooden boats any more. Most that do are nuts, old and cranky, but I've been called worse. Try looking up "traditional decks", "laid decks", "tongue and groove decks", "planked decks", etc. with the search engine.
     
  7. moTthediesel
    Joined: Apr 2006
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    Location: 1k Islands

    moTthediesel Junior Member

    Wow! A Lozier! Does it have the builders plate still on it? Was it made in Plattsburg NY? And does it still have it's original engine?
    If the answer to any or all of those questions is yes, you might have quite a valuable boat there :cool:
    I'd be leary of using modern methods to replace the deck, because even though they may be more servicable, they could negatively affect the value of the boat.
    I would think that it might have had mahogany decks with white oak covering boards originaly. Check to see if they were laid in the batten seam style. If so, the beams should be notched to allow narrow strips under each seam.
    You might want to contact the Antique Boat Museum in Clayton NY, as I'm pretty sure they have a very original Lozier Launch in their collection. They should be able to give you some first hand info.
    Good luck!
    moT
     
  8. sammy2
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    Location: illinois

    sammy2 Junior Member

    Thanks again Par would you mind if i E-mailed you a few photos? You sound like your the one i should have look her over? maybe you could give me some more insight from a few pics....
     
  9. sammy2
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    Location: illinois

    sammy2 Junior Member

    Thank You for the interest moTthediesel! Im not sure if it has builders plate (i dont know where it would be located) and really dont know where it was made? and im sorry to say that the original electric motor has been replaced in the early fortys for gasoline power. She has Quite a bit of Documantation as she was used as a touring boat. I plan on replacing the deck as originally made. Thanks again!
     

  10. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Click on my name, the email address is available there. Photos would be a big help, though I suspect there are several qualified persons in your area.
     
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