Random Picture Thread

Discussion in 'All Things Boats & Boating' started by kach22i, Mar 30, 2006.

  1. micah719
    Joined: Jul 2012
    Posts: 30
    Likes: 7, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 92
    Location: Somewhere in Germany

    micah719 Plotting Dreamer

    [​IMG]

    Free Boat! (it'll come in handy to store the free lifejackets and awning that arrived 5 minutes ago....)
     
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  2. ancient kayaker
    Joined: Aug 2006
    Posts: 3,497
    Likes: 147, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 2291
    Location: Alliston, Ontario, Canada

    ancient kayaker aka Terry Haines

    So that's what a flying boat is . . . it's amazing what one can do without an outboard!

    I wish there was a video of the launch. Imagine the interview with the traffic cop -

    "So the boat leapt out at you, sir? Odd; it's usually a tree . . . "
     
  3. ancient kayaker
    Joined: Aug 2006
    Posts: 3,497
    Likes: 147, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 2291
    Location: Alliston, Ontario, Canada

    ancient kayaker aka Terry Haines

    A new imprint is made for the Walk of Fame
     

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  4. ancient kayaker
    Joined: Aug 2006
    Posts: 3,497
    Likes: 147, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 2291
    Location: Alliston, Ontario, Canada

    ancient kayaker aka Terry Haines

    "Hi Mom, I may be late for supper . . . "
     

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  5. ancient kayaker
    Joined: Aug 2006
    Posts: 3,497
    Likes: 147, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 2291
    Location: Alliston, Ontario, Canada

    ancient kayaker aka Terry Haines

    From Star Wars file of Darth Vader candidates . . .

    [​IMG]
     
  6. Redtick
    Joined: Jul 2009
    Posts: 21
    Likes: 7, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 82
    Location: usa

    Redtick Junior Member

    This was in my fathers album, contrary to what is on the photo everything I find on the ship says the decommissioning was at San Francisco August 20 1946.
     

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  7. ancient kayaker
    Joined: Aug 2006
    Posts: 3,497
    Likes: 147, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 2291
    Location: Alliston, Ontario, Canada

    ancient kayaker aka Terry Haines

    Time for Plan B

    There are old kayakers and bold kayakers

    [​IMG]

    - and a surprising number of old, bold kayakers. But I'm not one of them.
     
  8. djaus
    Joined: Jun 2013
    Posts: 163
    Likes: 4, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 33
    Location: AU

    djaus Salted Nut!

    1959922_474547866004322_1627664904_n.jpg

    Hoong fatt.jpg
    "Sprell check"!
     
  9. brian eiland
    Joined: Jun 2002
    Posts: 4,970
    Likes: 189, Points: 73, Legacy Rep: 1903
    Location: St Augustine Fl, Thailand

    brian eiland Senior Member

    I totally agree with you. All this bull____ they are putting on these modern cars is just so much else to go wrong. Who's going to repair those touchy, feely slid controls they are putting in cars today. And do you think they can invent yet another remote rear view window controller. Wouldn't it save them time and money to at least use some sort of standard design for at least two years ??

    And why is it they feel like they need to make the driver feel like an airplane pilot with all those gauges, displays, lites, etc in the dash. Then they give you a speedo that is hidden up under a hood, and has such small lettering that you need to put your reading glasses on to tell what speed you are doing. Don't they realize the population is aging, and we'd like to have some idea as to our speed??

    Do any of these young designers ever test out these new ideas of their's before they get into production? How about these built in Nav/Radio/Climite Control 'Screens' right up most promenate in the dash. Did anyone think about providing a 'shade' for them, or a dimmer switch so their brightness didn't destroy your night vision, or early morning vision??

    I could go on and on, but I will rest my case here.
     
  10. ancient kayaker
    Joined: Aug 2006
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    Location: Alliston, Ontario, Canada

    ancient kayaker aka Terry Haines

    Personally I wouldn't want to go back to the '60's and '70's crapmobiles I had. I changed to the smallest, simplest Jap cars I could find for the '80's and got a couple of decades of cheap fun motoring then let myself get suckered into a Ford Taurus. I really don't want to talk about that but I almost gave up on NA cars entirely. Stupid heap was in the shop more often than once a month during the first year, rear suspension froze solid three times, rear brakes stopped working and took months for someone to figure out it had a wrong part etc.

    Then I had a look at what my mechanic was driving, and it's been GM ever since: they've been cheap, reliable, cheap to fix when they needed it which wasn't often and have steadily improved over the last 20 years. Since the Taurus I kept detailed records of repair frequency and cost and it's not just my imagination they have got better. Reminds me a bit of movies: if the critics pan it I will probably enjoy it and if they praise it I won't understand a darn thing. Never having owned a "classic" I have no longing for the "good old days".

    My current car - the basic underlying car that is - is the best I have ever had and that's the way it should be, just like my TV and my computer. However, cars have steadily got more and more complicated and there are now so many standard hi-tec features they insist I must have, no choice, that I can no longer do stuff I used to do by feel.

    It is bloody annoying to have to stop to figure out how to use the CD player so I just stopped using it - 8 track was far easier! Too many controls on the wheel too, and some of them are multiplexed, covering more than one function. I've had it 17 months and still get confused. It's embarrassing when I find I have called for directions instead of making a hands-off phone call. It's weird when the entertainment center starts looking for a Blue-tooth device instead of simply changing the channel. It's stupid when the cruise turns off intead of resuming - GM had such simple, glove-friendly controls way back. The teller and I do have a laugh when I open the rear window instead of the front one at the MacDonalds drive-through; at least I'm not ddriving along the road when that happens. At times it would make a good basis for a Monty Python skit, but it's not particularly safe and it's not good Human Engineering - one of the skills I studied during my former life as an engineer. Efforts to stop distracted driving should start before the car hits the road . . .

    Oh yes, those young engineers do test their designs, I've seen 'em do it, and they make the same mistakes as the software designers do when they test their own software - they know how it works already. Drivers of new vehicles need to be engineers on the same design team to use a modern vehicle to its full extent.
     
  11. hoytedow
    Joined: Sep 2009
    Posts: 5,856
    Likes: 398, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 2489
    Location: Control Group

    hoytedow Carbon Based Life Form

    I have enjoyed driving my Tacomas for the last 15 years. I have never had such a trouble free ride.
     
  12. brian eiland
    Joined: Jun 2002
    Posts: 4,970
    Likes: 189, Points: 73, Legacy Rep: 1903
    Location: St Augustine Fl, Thailand

    brian eiland Senior Member

    I drove a 1973 450SLC Mercedes for 30 years, and for the most part I could do most repairs myself. On early ones the parts were pretty reasonable as they built that 350-450 SL and SLC for a large number of years.

    slc.jpg

    ...a few more pics here:
    http://www.yachtforums.com/forums/83489-post47.html
     
  13. ancient kayaker
    Joined: Aug 2006
    Posts: 3,497
    Likes: 147, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 2291
    Location: Alliston, Ontario, Canada

    ancient kayaker aka Terry Haines

    Apart from the Taurus the only thing that terminated any of my cars for the last 30 years was rust. That imposed a ten year life on them, but my cars were econo-boxes and hard-used until recently so they were also clapped out.

    Since retirement I continue to replace them after ten years since after that time yearly maintenance cost more than their market value. They become to all intents and purposes disposable although they are working fine and have less than 100,000 km on the clock and would probably go for several times that as far as the mechanics are concerned.

    It's been a long time since I needed a second car as a backup and about 20 years since I had to leave a car in service overnight. It's almost always routine, have a coffee, read a page or two of the newspaper and drive home.

    I gave up trying to preserve them from rust, it cost more over a ten year period than the extra market value. The last three cars since the Taurus and the two before that have all been working fine when I dumped them; it's nothing to do with mechanical life, just a financial decision, ten years seems to give the lowest cost of ownership regardless of yearly mileage.

    I would clean the ashtrays if I smoked, and vacuum the interior faithfully once a year, and favor mud-colored finishes so I don't have to clean them. About the level of care I give to a dishwasher . . .
     
  14. hoytedow
    Joined: Sep 2009
    Posts: 5,856
    Likes: 398, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 2489
    Location: Control Group

    hoytedow Carbon Based Life Form

    from the boat show:
     

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  15. lewisboats
    Joined: Oct 2002
    Posts: 2,329
    Likes: 129, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 1603
    Location: Iowa

    lewisboats Obsessed Member

    Back in the late 60's and 70's when I lived in Montreal... 6 years was about the average life of the body of a car. My first was a 73 Olds Omega (in 1981) and it flapped and rattled down the road something horrible. I did love that 350 rocket with the 4 bbl... used to make mince meat of the 70's 'Vettes. Perhaps because it was so light... having lost considerable weight in rust flakes.
     
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