Quidnic shanty tiny house boat

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Quidnic, Apr 19, 2020.

  1. Squidly-Diddly
    Joined: Sep 2007
    Posts: 1,668
    Likes: 102, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 304
    Location: SF bay

    Squidly-Diddly Senior Member

    I'm thinking more PVC as axle housings for the 5/8" allthread or drill rod (in USA) standard wheel borrow wheel bearings. Use a few of these to secure the PVC to 2x4, and the 5/8" axle would be 24" long with 20" inside the PVC. Not sure about holding up a generator but maybe slip the PVC on the forementioned (placed on vertical posts at the four corners) posts for general purposes such as privacy screens, lights, drying laundry or flying flags.
     
    NomadOmad likes this.
  2. NomadOmad
    Joined: Aug 2020
    Posts: 15
    Likes: 1, Points: 3
    Location: Uk

    NomadOmad Junior Member

    Yes brilliant to use everything for multiple purposes

    I’m confident about building the frame and shell of the boat, but I’m not so confident about fitting her out to a high standard that my wife would actually want to stay on.

    I wonder are there any flat pack kits that would do? It’s only narrow so normal kitchens may not work.

    I’m wondering if making it 6’6 so it could travel the canals of the UK is too restrictive.

    to make it 8’ beam would be so easy and efficient with less cutting the ply sheets. Then Over 6’ high and stick to 24’ length (6x4’ ply sheets)

    Then you could buy good value high quality fitted kitchen And other standard fit out. After all this is more house than houseboat
     
  3. NomadOmad
    Joined: Aug 2020
    Posts: 15
    Likes: 1, Points: 3
    Location: Uk

    NomadOmad Junior Member



    those feathering paddle wheels would be so amazing on the pods either side of the Quidnic tiny houseboat.

    these pods are based on the gorfnik micro cruiser. But these pods won’t have a hard cabin top, it would be soft collapsing tent. Two feathering paddle wheels that are in place of the leeboards while sailing, and can be actually used as wheels that you peddle on land as it’s amphibious


    This micro house boat is really just a glorified stand up paddle board that you can push to the water and do some fishing on.

    Technically it can sailed, and be paddled like a paddle board. It can also be peddled like a peddle boat, and again technically it could be peddled on land. But it won't do any of these things very well.

    But it can be made very comfortable to sleep in, and for exploring inshore water ways.
     

    Attached Files:

  4. NomadOmad
    Joined: Aug 2020
    Posts: 15
    Likes: 1, Points: 3
    Location: Uk

    NomadOmad Junior Member

    Here is an example of the pods with soft tent cabin instead of hard top
     

    Attached Files:

  5. NomadOmad
    Joined: Aug 2020
    Posts: 15
    Likes: 1, Points: 3
    Location: Uk

    NomadOmad Junior Member

    Of course the pods will have flat bottom but that’s the only difference

    the yellow version above with tent cabin is brilliant

    I wonder if it would work made in the dimensions of 6’x3’ instead of the current 8’x4’?
     
  6. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
    Posts: 14,509
    Likes: 660, Points: 123, Legacy Rep: 2031
    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    The fundamental flaw in that design is the beam to length ratio. With little available power, it should be long and narrow. Canals allow for fairly long boats. You only need 2' beam to be able to lay down and sleep.
     
  7. mitchgrunes
    Joined: Jul 2020
    Posts: 19
    Likes: 0, Points: 1
    Location: Maryland

    mitchgrunes Junior Member

    I'm not an engineer. So these are just random musings:

    I think sinking would be your biggest potentially problem. If you use enough reasonably strong foam to provide flotation, that would solve it - but most foams, including most insulation foams you buy at hardware store, shed little pieces that are very ecologically incorrect - and are one of the biggest and most worrying sources of pollution. They need to be coated and covered in something.

    BTW, from what I have heard, most wooden boats require a tremendous amount of maintenance - often hundreds or thousands of hours / year. Epoxy coverage will help a lot, but not forever. And once in a while, you need to take them out of the water to maintain and re-coat them. Even metal, plastic and composite boats need something like that occasionally, even if you cover them with anti-fouling paint.

    BTW, may I suggest cheap vinyl flooring as a very cheap yet comparatively strong waterproof material - though it won't conform well to elaborately curved shapes. Also, as a top floor, it is easy to clean.

    For electricity, solar power, combined with rechargeable batteries, has become increasingly cheap.

    One possible power source, in a moderately fast flowing river: anchor the boats, and use a cheaply built horizontal turbine with a generator - perhaps a discarded bicycle generator, though they don't provide much power. In a tidal river, you could do the same thing.

    Any local community is likely to see water borne "vagrants" as a very bad thing - especially if they don't treat their sewage. It is illegal many places to dump sewage as well. And you need ecologically correct ways to get rid of trash.

    Paddle wheels are like vertical water turbines. An engineer could explain why, but they are very inefficient, compared to horizontal turbines, with carefully shaped chambers.

    I'm doubtful whether you could grow enough food on top of a tiny houseboat to be of much use, but could be wrong. It would also make it more obvious that you were living on board long term.

    I worry about cooking. Wood is flammable. Epoxy is flammable. Vinyl is slightly flammable. You certainly need ways to put out fire.

    What about storms?

    A folding bicycle would be nice to occasionally go shopping, if you can't shop right next to the river. But if you dock the boat, that costs money. If you swim ashore, carrying the bike would be problematical. Perhaps inline skates in a waterproof bag, and shoes to change into? At least when it is warm. If you have severe winter weather, you are going to have problems living out on the water. A frozen river could easily damage your boat.

    When it isn't winter, I wonder if bicycle touring is a better option.

    You need a source of income. I suspect very few professions let you do that as a vagrant - excuse me - wanderer.
     
  8. clmanges
    Joined: Jul 2008
    Posts: 366
    Likes: 39, Points: 28, Legacy Rep: 32
    Location: Ohio

    clmanges Senior Member

    Not necessarily. Read this:
    The White Boat http://hvartial.kapsi.fi/white/white.htm

    ZERO maintenance in 13 years.
     
  9. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
    Posts: 14,509
    Likes: 660, Points: 123, Legacy Rep: 2031
    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    Throwing water at the fire will take care of it.
     
  10. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
    Posts: 14,509
    Likes: 660, Points: 123, Legacy Rep: 2031
    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    As an engineer I will tell you there are nothing alike. Turbines do not have a change of efficiency depending on orientation. An example of efficient vertical turbines are rockets. Another are turbines in hydroelectric dams.
     
  11. johnvictor
    Joined: Sep 2020
    Posts: 2
    Likes: 0, Points: 1
    Location: canada

    johnvictor New Member

    Tiny house boats are called Shanty Boats. Look at what other people have done.

    The problem with using pontoons like you're doing is that it raises the center of gravity (less stability) and the windage (more fuel burned). Most builders put the floor below the water line.

    I suggest you build in dimensions/proportions that can be trailered as most people with shanty boats take them out of the water when they're not occupied.

    You're going to have structural failure at the joints with a flat panel design. Use stitch and glue and curved panels to get more strength for less weight and less material cost.
     
  12. Squidly-Diddly
    Joined: Sep 2007
    Posts: 1,668
    Likes: 102, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 304
    Location: SF bay

    Squidly-Diddly Senior Member

    PyroGuard - Interior Fire Retardant Treated Wood | Hoover Treated Wood Products - Fire Retardant Treated Wood https://frtw.com/?q=pyroguard Doesn't cost much more than regular plywood and comes in common construction grades like ACX in common thickness like 1/2" or 5/8" etc. Mostly used for mounting electrical panels but can be nice looking natural varnish finish interior. Got some leftovers with airport/food approved varnish finish in stock. :)
     

  13. Squidly-Diddly
    Joined: Sep 2007
    Posts: 1,668
    Likes: 102, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 304
    Location: SF bay

    Squidly-Diddly Senior Member

Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.